Tag Archives: Wicked Way Back Wednesdays

May on August

Another Wicked Way-back Wednesday….a 17th century bill of fare for the month of August. Notice – Neither a hot dog nor hamburger to be see; no ice cream or gelato or potato salad or ketchup or Popsicle, but it does start with melons  ….. but after that it’s a little more unfamiliar.

A Bill of Fare for August.

Muskmelons.

All cantaloupes are musk melons, but not all musk melons are cantaloupes

All cantaloupes are musk melons, but not all musk melons are cantaloupes

1 Scotch collops of Veal.(COLLUPS: slices of meat, such as bacon. Randle Holme defines Scotch or Scots collups as thin, salted slices of mutton or beef, broiled and served with vinegar and butter. (Richard Bradley, 1736) Prospect Books: Glossery (this is the address – it doesn’t want to link for me –  https://prospectbooks.co.uk/glossary/c)

2 Boil’d Breast of Mutton.
3 A Fricase of Pigeons.
4 A stewed Calves head.

Tête-à-tête de veau. Credits: L. John Harris zester 2011

Tête-à-tête de veau.
Credits: L. John Harris zester 2011

5 Four Goslings.(baby geese)
6 Four Caponets.(baby capons – which are rooster with their boy bits removed)

A Second Course.

1 Dotterel twelve, six larded

Dotterel_from_the_Crossley_ID_Guide_Britain_and_Ireland

Dotterals – these could be the six larded…or not

2 Tarts Royal of Fruit.
3 Wheat-ears.

An ear of wheat - not the wheat ear he means

An ear of wheat – not the wheat ear he means

Wheatear - yet another tiny, tasty bird

Wheatear – yet another tiny, tasty bird

4 A Pye of Heath-Pouts.
5 Marinate Smelts.
6 Gammon of Bacon.
Selsey Cockles.

Cockles (French, not necessarily the same as East Sussex)

Cockles (French, not necessarily the same as East Sussex)

Robert May

Jan Davidsz de Heen

Jan Davidsz de Heen Still-life with Fruit and Ham 1648 – In my minds eye this is Robert May’s August table

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More Pudding ( a wicked way back one….)

and a Pudding Contest.
Here are the rules for the 2014 Pudding Hollow Pudding Contest:

This is the pudding mold/crown for the winner of the contest – knowing Tinky, there will be other wonderful prizes as well

1. Contestants must be able to come to Hawley, Massachusetts, on September 28 by 11 am. If you are unable to attend the actual contest, you may send your pudding with a representative. You will be eligible for some prizes but not for the first-place award. Contestants must bring enough pudding to serve at least eight people and must march in the PUDDING PARADE. (If finalists are coming from far away, they may arrange to reheat their puddings in local kitchens.)

2. All recipes must be from original sources. That is, the formula for your own squash pudding or your Aunt Myrtle’s rice pudding is eligible. A recipe from a book is not.

3. Ingredients must be listed in the order used in the recipe. All ingredients listed must be used in the recipe instructions.

4. No pudding that has reached the finals in a previous year may be reentered.

5. Recipes will not be returned. The Sons & Daughters of Hawley and the Merry Lion Press reserve the right to reprint all recipes. No pudding will be accepted in the contest without a recipe.

 

and now for a pudding from the past, in verse no less….

Receipt for a Pudding

 If the vicar you treat,
You must give him to eat,
A pudding to hit his affection;
And to make his repast,
By the canon of taste,
Be the present receipt your direction.

First take two pounds of Bread,
Be the crumb only weigh’d,
For the crust the good house-wife refuses;
The proportion you’ll guess,
May be made more or less,
To the size that each family chuses.

Then its sweetness to make
Some currants you take
And Sugar of each half a pound
Be not butter forgot
And the quantity sought
Must the same with your currants be found

Cloves & mace you will want,
With rose water I grant,
And more savory things if well chosen;
Then to bind each ingredient,
You’ll find it expedient,
Of Eggs to put in half a dozen.

Some milk don’t refuse it,
But boiled ere you use it,
A proper hint this for its maker;
And the whole when compleat,
In a pan clean and neat,
With care recommend to the baker.

In praise of this pudding,
I vouch it a good one,
Or should you suspect a fond word;
To every Guest,
Perhaps it is best,
Two puddings should smoke on the board.

Two puddings!– yet – no,
For if one will do,
The other comes in out of season;
And these lines but obey,
Nor can anyone say,
That this pudding’s with-out rhyme or reason

Contributed by Mrs. Cassandra Austen(Jane’s mother) to Martha Lloyd’s collection of recipes, 1808The Poetry of Jane Austen and the Austen Family  by David Selwyn (Editor)

Jane Austin

Jane Austin

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Muffings (English implied)

Wicked Way-Back Wednesday

English muffings from the 18th century.

For version for a 21st century cook, see Paula Marcoux’s Cooking with Fire

Cooking with Fire by Paula Marcoux

Cooking with Fire by Paula Marcoux

To make Muffings and Oat-Cakes.

To a buſhel of Hertfordſhire white flour, take a Pint and a half of good Ale-yeaſt, from pale Malt, if you can get it, becauſe it is whiteſt ; let the Yeaſt lie in Water all Night, the next Day pour off the Water clear, make two Gallons of Water juſt Milk warm, not to ſcald your Yeaſt, and two Ounces of Salt ; mix your Water, Yeaſt, and Salt well together for about a quarter of an Hour, then ſtrain it and mix up your Dough as light as poſſible, and let it lie in your Trough an Hour to riſe, then with your Hand roll it and pull it into little Pieces about as big as a large Walnut, roll them with your Hand like a Ball, lay them on your Table, and as faſt as you do them lay a Piece of Flannel over them, and be ſure to keep your Dough cover’d with Flannel ; when you have rolled out all your Dough begin to bake the firſt, and by that Time they will be ſpread out in the right Form ; lay them on your Iron ; as one Side begins to change Colour turn the other, and take great Care they don’t burn, or be too much diſcolour’d, but that you will be a Judge off in two or three Makings. Take care the middle of the iron is not too hot, as it will be, but then you may put a Brick-bat or two in the middle of the Fire to ſlacken the Heat. The Thing you bake on muſt be made thus:
Build a Place juſt as if you was going to ſet a Copper, and in the ſtead of a Copper, a Piece of Iron all over the Top fix’d in Form juſt the ſame as the Bottom of an Iron Pot, and make your fire underneath with Coal as in a Copper: obſerve, Muffings are made the ſame Way ; only this, when you pull them to Pieces roll them in a good deal of Flour, and with a Rolling-pin roll them thin, cover them with a Piece of Flannel, and they will riſe a proper Thickneſs ; and if you find them too big or too little, you muſt roll Dough accordingly. Theſe muſt not be the leaſt diſcoloured.
And when you eat them, toaſt them with a Fork criſp on both Sides, then with your Hand pull them open, and they will be like a Honey-Comb ; lay in as much butter as you intend to uſe, then clap them together again, and ſet it by the Fire. When you think the Butter is melted turn them, that both Sides may be butter’d alike, but don’t touch them with a Knife, either to spread or cut them open, if you do they will be as heavy as Lead, only when they are quite buttered and done, you may cut them acroſs with a knife.
Note, Some Flour will ſoak up a Quart or three Pints more water than other Flour ; then you muſt add more Water, or ſhake in more Flour in making up, for the Dough muſt be as light as poſſible.

(The intial transcript came from Celtnet – then I added the random caps and italics from the Prospect Books edition.

Read more at Celtnet: http://www.celtnet.org.uk/recipes/glasse-wine-brewing-bread-17.php
Copyright © celtnet)

“First Catch Your Hare…” The Art of Cookery Made Plain and Easy. A Lady (Hannah Glasse). Facsimile of the first edition, 1747. Prospect Books, 1995. p. 151.

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