Tag Archives: spaghetti

Mushroom Mouth

Growing up, a mushroom mouth was not the mouth of a mushroom lover…..

br pizza

Bob Ross and Happy Pizza with Mushrooms Mouth…..

‘Mushroom mouth’ was the English translation of an Italian phrase , ‘mussi di funghi’…. that meant , literally – mushroom mouth. Except, of course, this isn’t how I can find the phrase on the Internet….mouth tranlates to  – apertura, or  bocca, but I can’t find a mussi...but it’s still a thing….even if it’s a dialect thing

Like pursed lips….

J Lo blowing a kiss

Not to be confused with the kiss blowing pursed lips…

JLo pursed lips

This is the very ‘not my happy mouth’ mushroom mouth look. Thank you, J Lo for being so expressive!

and now some mushrooms….

mushroom, white

White mushrooms

mushrooms

Lots of lovely mushrooms

 

and they had already-sliced fresh mushroom on the markdown bin at the store….so I snapped them up. I used to make a really easy, really tasty mushroom sauce for pasta, so easy that if I couldn’t remember which cookbook it was in, I could probably make something close anyhow….

 

My son is not a fan of the mushroom, so most of the last 20 years I haven’t used mushrooms as a main ingredient (although they have played supporting roles in a few things)….

I looked for the cook book with the terrific mushroom sauce recipe  and found the recipe, but not exactly in the book I thought it would be in .It wasn’t quite as I remembered it. The page was too small and there weren’t as many smudges as I remembered, and the type face was off…..but it was here:

NH best of Italian cooking

This book also came out later then I remembered using the recipe  and I remember making the sauce in the early ‘8o’s……mystery..

Mushroom Spaghetti Sauce

Salsa di funghi per spaghetti

6 tablespoons butter, divided

4 medium onions, thinly sliced

2 pounds mushrooms, sliced

Salt

Fresh ground pepper

¼ teaspoon ground nutmeg

1 cup heavy cream

  1. Heat 3 tablespoons butter in a heavy skillet over medium heat. Add onions and sauté until golden brown, 5-7 minutes, stirring frequently.
  2. Cover and turn the heat to low. Cook for 20 minutes, or until the onions are very, meltingly, soft, stirring occasionally.
  3. In another pan, one large enough for the full sauce, melt the other 3 tablespoons butter. Cook the mushrooms until tender. Season with salt and pepper and the nutmeg. Keep hot.
  4. Meanwhile, start cooking 1 pound spaghetti.
  5. Five minutes before serving….add the cream to the mushrooms and onions. Heat, but do not let boil or it will curdle.
  6. Drain the cooked spaghetti, add the sauce, mix and serve with grated Parmesan cheese.
  7. Easy, rich, delicious.

Adapted from Nika Hazelton’s From Nika Hazelton’s Kitchen.Viking, 1985. p.237. and Nika Hazelton The Best of Italian Cooking. Weathervane Books, 1989. p.163-4.

From NH kitchen large

This is the volume with the smudges…she used the same recipe in 2 volumes! Mystery solved.

There was also a time during the ’70’s that I had confused Nika Hazelton with Marcella Hazen, just based on their names and that they were both producing Italian cook books. There was no Internet or social media, so all I had was names on a book cover and my poor memory to depend on.

 

 

Regional It. Kitch

This is the other Nika that I have

Oh, Look!

Chocolate Cake!

Looks like I’ll be spending a little more time with Nika….

Nika Hazelton

Nika Hazelton

 

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Filed under Books, Recipe, The 1980's

FULL HOUSE

A card hand…

Full-HouseA TV series

Full_House_1987_TV_series_logoWhich leads to a house Full….

Full_House_-_The_Complete_Series

The complete TV series in a box shaped like a house

"The category if "Ful"...", says Alex

“The category is ‘Ful’ “, says Alex.

USEFUL

divisionBEAUTIFUL

greenway sculpture

String Sculpture over the Rose Kennedy Greenway

ARTFUL

Giovanni Battista Ruoppolo - Still Life of Fish with Char, Bass, Rockfish, Sea Bream and shells  - 17th century

Giovanni Battista Ruoppolo – Still Life of Fish with Char, Bass, Rockfish, Sea Bream and Shells – 17th century – the painter is from Naples and was born in 1629.

CUPFUL

a-perfect-white-cup-of-steaming-coffee_w520GRATEFUL

may10DrDyer

PLAYFUL

Right Whales right of the coast here - and 17 new baby whales!

Right Whales right off the coast here in May – and 17 new baby whales!

PEACEFUL

It feels like Winter is SOOOOOO (finally) OVAH - time for some Peaceful Meadows!

It feels like Winter is SOOOOOO (finally) OVAH – time for some Peaceful Meadows!

MOUTHFUL

SOOOO – If you have a bag of lemons, and you forget what inspired you to take them home in the first place

AND someone at work leaves a copy of Good Housekeeping on the table….

AND there’s a recipe for Spaghetti with Lemon Ricotta – that’s a sign, right?

Good House Keeping USA 2015-03_

AND I can organize my life….right

Basic spaghetti with ricotta sauce, nice lemon grated peel here… : spaghettini-lemon-ricotta-recipe

Now – I didn’t make my own ricotta, (and I would argue that what they have you make isn’t actually ricotta, although it sounds plenty GOOD) so I added a little extra lemon peel, and I juiced those yellow orbs because I’m supposed to use the peels and throw the fruit away????

I think NOT.

WASTEFUL

Lemon-edit1

Use the whole lemon – the rind can be dried; the juice can be frozen; the seeds can be planted….

It  was quick and easy, it was fine, it was OK. It was also a little….dull.

STIFLE YAWN.

Downright pedestrian.

BORING.

Indifferent Housekeeping.

Then there were the LEFTOVERS.

Some things are fine just re-heated or even served cold as part of lunch the next day, some things need a little more…..help.

For me leftover bascetti usually means

FRITTATA.

Spaghetti_spiral,_2008

Bascetti, a/k/a ‘spaghetti’

To make leftovers into lunch or another night’s supper:

  • Shop the pantry and fridge for flavor enhancers. I had a red pepper,and a green pepper that I cut up and tossed in a pan with some olive oil, a nice generous amount of olive oil. An onion chopped fine and a clove or two of garlic are not amiss here either. Celery would also work or in a different direction, mushrooms. Choices, you got choices. If you see things in your mind’s eye, do you taste things in your mind’s mouth? Ponder as you scope and chop.
  • The little grapes tomatoes (that were pretty large for grape tomatoes) and not entirely tomato-ish on their own were halved and added in towards the end, to release the juices and the flavor.
  • Beat half a dozen eggs with salt, pepper and grated Romano cheese.
  • Toss the leftover spaghetti with the eggs. I had a little more ricotta and added more lemon peel at this point. Basil would have been nice – or a handful of chopped parsley would have been a different green element way to go.
  • When the pepper mixture cools a bit, toss that in and around too.
  • How does it smell ? Adjust until it smells good.
  • Put more olive oil in the pan and heat it on medium for a minute…add the mixture, flatten it around, and give it a shake to settle it all to the bottom.
  • Let it fry up for two minutes without disturbing – then shake and shimmy the pan so that the uncooked egg puddles get closer to the heat.
  • Poke at the edges towards the center with a spatula so that it doesn’t stick.This makes so much more sense at the stove then it seems here on the page.There is a whole lotta cooking that’s learned by looking.

    Choose your poking/turning weapon of choice

    Choose your poking/turning spatula  weapon of choice

  • Turn the heat to low, put a lid on it, and leave it alone for a while. Go set the table,humming Italian songs along with Lou Monte on the CD player.

TUNEFUL

Lou Monte

So many songs in the language between Italian and English. If only I could write in that language!

PLATEFUL!

Frittata wiki

Frittata can be served warm or cold or even in a sangwich.

DELIGHTFUL

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Filed under Eating, Italian, Lunch, Supper

Olive U

Oh, yes I do.

Little olive, I love you.

 

Olea eurpaea Kobler

Olea eurpaea Kobler

Although in my kitchen, they often look more like this:Pastene_pitted_black_olivesThe problem is, once I open a can, I can eat a can full.  In a very short time. Let’s just say, there isn’t a storage issue…often not even a serving issue….

So I buy olives when I planning to sue them IN things, and then I can enjoy them over several days, which in the end, is more enjoyable.

Olives in a sauce, and some olives in a salad….

Here’s a story for a sauce, according to wiki:

According to Annarita Cuomo, writer for Il Golfo, a daily newspaper serving the Italian islands of Ischia and Procida, sugo alla puttanesca was invented in the 1950s by Sandro Petti, co-owner of Rancio Fellone, a famous Ischian restaurant and nightspot

In the February 17th, 2005 edition of the newspaper, Cuomo says the moment of inspiration came, when near closing one evening, Petti found a group of customers sitting at one of his tables. Petti was low on ingredients and told them he didn’t have enough to make them a meal. They complained that it was late and they were hungry. “Facci una puttanata qualsiasi (Make any kind of garbage),” they insisted. In this usage, puttanata is an Italian noun meaning something worthless. It derives from the Italian word for whore, puttana.

At the time, Petti had nothing more than four tomatoes, two olives and some capers; the basic ingredients for the sugo. “So I used them to make the sauce for the spaghetti,” Petti told Cuomo.

Later, Petti included this dish on his menu as spaghetti alla puttanesca.

Some versions include anchovies, but I usually make this without the little fish.

Pasta Puttanesca

Olive oil (two swirls around the pan)
4 smooshed garlic cloves
1 small onion, diced
1 28 oz can whole tomatoes (I like lots of chunky bits – use crushed tomatoes if you don’t OR if you’re topping spaghetti or another finer pasta shape)
Salt
½ cup pitted, chopped black olives (or more….)
1 Tablespoon capers
1 tsp red hot pepper flakes (more to sprinkle on top, if you like it hot – it keeps getting hotter, so don’t over-do if you’ll be saving some for another meal)
1/3 cup chopped parsley (or half a supermarket bunch, which seems to vary with the season and how much rain wherever THAT bunch of parsley was grown) OR 6-8 fresh basil leaves, shredded
1 # penne – or another sturdy pasta with nooks and crannies
Grating cheese

1 Put on the pot of water to cook the pasta in.
2 Swirl the olive oil in another pan; bring to medium heat and add the onions
3 When the onions begin to soften, add the garlic.
4 Add the tomatoes, squishing them through your fingers to make good sized chunks. Pour in the liquid from the can.
5 Season with salt, and simmer on low.
6 When the pasta water comes to the boil, salt that and boil the penne until al dente.
7 Add the olives, the capers, the parsley (or basil) and the red pepper flakes to the tomatoes.
8 Save out 1 cup of the pasta, drain the penne.
9 Add the penne to the sauce (or vice versa, depending on your pot/pan situation). Add some of the save water if the sauce needs thinning.
10 Serve with grating cheese.

Pasta Puttanesca

Pasta Puttanesca

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Filed under Eating, Recipe, Uncategorized

Aglio e Olio

Aglio and Olio is Garlic and Oil and that’s another Meatless Monday Dish.

garlic lots

The Garlic and Oil are the sauce for spaghetti.

Spaghetti with Garlic and Oil

10 garlic cloves, thinly sliced(most other recipes call for less – but then it’s merely garlic-ish and not garlic. Garlic keeps you healthy and the parsley helps your breath)

6 tablespoon olive oil

1 teaspoon red pepper flakes

¼ cup finely chopped fresh parsley ( plus more for sprinkling on top)

1 pound spaghetti

Grating cheese

  1. Start a pot of water for the spaghetti
  2. Put olive oil and slice garlic in another pan over medium heat. PAY CLOSE ATTENTION HERE. Do not get distracted for the next 3-4 minutes. Stir this occasionally until the garlic just starts to begin to brown – 2-3 minutes.
  3. Add the red pepper flakes and the chopped parsley. Stir it around and remove from the heat.
  4. When the water comes to a boil, add salt and the spaghetti.  Cook until al dente. Save a ½ cup of the pasta water and then drain.
  5. Put the spaghetti back in the cooking pot, add the garlic and oil mixture and ¼ cup of the pasta water. Toss over medium heat until all the spaghetti is well coated, adding more water if necessary.
  6. Serve with grated cheese.

From Mario Batali. Molto Gusto. p. 140.

Molto Mario

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Filed under Books, Recipe