Tag Archives: Pumpkin Bread

Pumpkin Bread

Not just ANY pumpkin bread.

Mary Peddell’s never fail, super zippy, fast and easy, quick bread pumpkin bread.

Although in polite conversation she was Mrs Peddell (until in more recent years when she is Mrs Crothers) the bread has always been, to us, Mary Peddell’s. My mother made this literally hundreds of times in the late ’60’s, early ’70’s. I have made it hundreds of other times in the early ’70’s to the right nows. I have copied this recipe out of the Church Cookbook several times, just to make sure I wouldn’t/couldn’t lose it.

Easy-peasy.

Doubles easily.

Make two.

One to snack on when it comes out of the oven, the other for whatever you intended it for in the first place.

.

Mary Peddell’s Pumpkin Bread

1 ½ C sugar* (I sometimes use a little less now)

½ C salad oil

2 eggs

1 C canned pumpkin

1 2/3 C flour

1 tsp soda

½ tsp cloves

¾ tsp salt

¼ tsp baking powder

½ tsp cinnamon

½ tsp nutmeg

½ C raisins

½ C nuts

Mix together and put in a greased loaf pan. Bake at 350 degrees for 1 ½ hours.

  1. A Book of Favorite RECIPES compiled by the Ladies Sodality of St. Joseph the Worker Church, Hanson, Mass. p. 59.

Serve with tea or coffee, old friends or new, cream cheese or Brie….you’ll have time while it’s baking and cooling to figure out your game plan.

Plain ole pumpkin. Easy and good. If you want to pick out a pumpkin, peel, seed, boil, drain (or roast) and then mash - go right ahead! Freeze it in 1 Cup batches so it's good to go when you want it.

Plain ole pumpkin. Easy and good. If you want to pick out a pumpkin, peel, seed, boil, drain (or roast) and then mash – go right ahead! Freeze it in 1 Cup batches so it’s good to go when you want it.

If you pick up the pie filling instead of regular plain pumpkin, you have jsut let Libby's do the seasoning for you. Adjust the spices accordingly.

If you pick up the pie filling instead of regular plain pumpkin, you have just let Libby’s do the seasoning for you. Adjust the spices accordingly. Pumpkin, Sugar Syrup, Water, Salt, Natural Flavors, Spices. Gluten free. Better plan – just use the plain pumpkin.

This is what we felt we looked like back when Mary Peddell's Pumpkin Bread was new to us...

This is what we felt we looked like back when Mary Peddell’s Pumpkin Bread was new to us…groovy

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Filed under Autumn, Recipe, The 1960"s

Punkin Bread Puddin

Last week, after making Indian Pudding and Sops of Pompion for the Mass Bay masses….I found I had rather a lot of sops of pompion left.

There are some things that can be re-heated and be just fine…but OTHER things need to be re-imagined to turn into something else altogether to eat.

Let’s start with the sops……..

Here’s the 17th century recipe for the sops…..

To butter Gourds, Pumpions, Cucumbers or Muskmelons.

Cut them into pieces, and pare and cleanse them; then have a boiling pan of water, and when it boils put in the pumpions, &c. with some salt, being boil’d, drain them well from the water, butter them, and serve them on sippets with pepper.

– 1675. Robert May, The Accomplist Cook,

RobertMayTheAccomplishtCookFrontispieceI’ve never tried this with gourds or cucumber or even muskmelons – only pumpkins.And my pompion/pumpkin/punkins  in this case were pre-peeled butternut squash from the grocery store.
In Austraila butternut squash is called butternut pumpkin...confused yet?

In Austraila butternut squash is called butternut pumpkin…confused yet?

I cut the pumpkin into smallish cubes, and dropped it into a pot of boiling, salted water. When it was tender I drained it.

Just like macaroni.

I toasted sliced Thirded Bread from Plimoth Plantation’s  Plimoth Bread Company. For the Boston event I carried both elements separately and finished the sops when I got there to Boston:

Put ample butter in a frying pan, add the cubed, boiled squash and saute until heated, golden and just starting to get a little not quite mushy, but most definitely soft. Spread the pumpkin and butter on the toasted bread – I cut each slice into halves or thirds to make it easy to eat as an appetizer.. Sprinkle the tops with fresh ground pepper. Easy. Serve. Great with beer.Or with soup. Once you have it, you’ll figure out how it fits into your life.

And then the leftovers ( a late 19th century term) …..otherwise known as the relics or the orts……to PrestoChangeo into

PUDDIN

  1. Take your pumpkin sops and eyeball them. You should roughly equal amounts of bread and pumpkin. There were some pears that were a few minutes past peak, so they got cut up and added to the mix. With a whole grain bread you’ll need to add a little more moisture. If you have an enriched type bread, not so much to worry.You can break the pieces up or keep them very large to be broken up in the serving.
  2. The liquid is going to be about equal to the mass of the bread and fruit (technically, pumpkin is a fruit, so is squash) so plan panage accordingly.
  3. The bottom half of a granite ware roasting pan was my choice

    The bottom half of a granite ware roasting pan was my choice. Any type of baking dish you can put in the oven will do.

    Butter the pan very well. Then butter it again even better. As Julia Child has said, “Add more  butter”. The butter keeps it from sticking and the butter will help the edges brown and crisp up nicely and just improve everything.

  4. Mix equal amounts of milk/cream and/or half and half with beaten eggs . We used 6 eggs, but four would be enough for a smaller amount. I’m thinking the ratio is 1:1:1:1 – bread:fruit:eggs:milk. If you have juicy fruit (peaches, say, not the gum) keep that in mind when sloshing in liquids. It’s very forgiving. A little longer in the oven helps dry it out.

    juicy-fruit-vintage-packaging

    Commercial Break!

  5. Mix the eggs and milk together with the bread and fruit. Now is the time to think about spicing…..if you don’t know how to pumpkin spice…….pumpkin pie spice
  6. Or you could go with something different….Ginger, cinnamon and some anise seeds are good. Nutmeg on top another good choice.  Or orange peel and fennel seeds…..
  7. Drizzle honey all across the top. Be generous, like the caramel on a sea salt caramel latte generous.
  8. This whole thing can sit while the oven heats up…helps every little thing to soak up and get it’s act together, working out the melody and the harmonies so it can stand up and sing when it time to serve it.
  9. Bake in a 350° oven until heated through and has crispy edges and a knife in the middle comes out dry and not dripping.
  10. Enjoy hot, warm or cold.

Now if you had Pumpkin Bread….you could also make a different Punkin Bread Pudding again…

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Filed under Autumn, Bread, Recipe