Tag Archives: popcorn

PopCorn!

Just a little more…having found one

popcorn macroon allrecipes2017

and then another…..

I found a third

popcorn macaroon recipe

So I’m sharing.

 

Pop Corn Macaroons

        Mix half a cupful of popped and rolled corn (Nelson’s is the best). And half a package of chopped raisins, one cupful of powdered sugar, the whites of two eggs and a tablespoon of flour together and drop on greased brown paper by the tablespoonsful and bake in a moderate oven until light brown.

  • Talbott, Mary Hamilton. Pop Corn Recipes. Grinnell, Iowa: Sam Nelson, Jr., Company, 1916. n.p. in In Andy Smith’s Popped Culture, University of South Carolina Press, 1999. p. 200.

popcornrecipes00talb_0017

popcornrecipes00talb_cover

Popped Culture

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Macaroons and Popcorn

I’m just back from Rochester New York, where ALHFAM was this year.

ALHFAM is Association of Living History Farms and Museums so this was a professional development trip .

There was a whole lot of foods of the past in the program.

macaroons 2017

A Short, Sweet History of Macaroons  presented by Mya Sangster was very sweet indeed.

Mya made samples …A little bag with labeled cookies  so you could eat along with the recipes….

And then another lot up front, all the variations from a single recipe that called for

Almond, walnut, ground nut (peanut) cob nut (hazel or filbert) and coconut

Peanut macaroons are a marvelous and wonderful thing.

Somewhere I have the handout that has the recipes.

May 31st is National Macaroon Day, so I have time to get my act together before the next big celebration.

But I keep finding miscellaneous macaroons in my ordinary reading …like this:

The Sunflower:

I once made macaroons with the ripe blanch’d seeds, but the turpentine did so domineer over all, that it did not answer expectations.”

               Evelyn, John. A Discourse of Sallets. (1699)Prospect Books. 2005. p. 45.

So, Sunflower Macaroons – right out!

and then this:

Popcorn Macaroons

1 cup freshly popped corn

1 cup walnuts or butternuts

3 egg whites

1 cup powdered sugar

Pinch of salt

  1. Heat oven to 350°F. Butter a cooky* sheet.

  2. Chop the popcorn and the nutmeats or put them through the food chopper.

  3. Beat the egg whites stiff and combine with the sugar. Mix with the popcorn and nuts, add salt.

  4. Drop by the spoonful on a buttered cooky sheet.

  5. Bake fifteen minutes in a moderate oven, 350°.

  6. Makes one and half dozen.

 

  • Bowles, Ella Shannon and Dorothy S. Towle. Secrets of New England Cooking. Dover: 2000. First published M. Barrows and Co.: NY. 1947. p. 217.

 

Secrets NE cooking

and then there were other popped corn macaroons.

Popped Corn Macaroons

3/4 cup finely chopped popped corn

3/4 tablespoon melted butter

White 1 egg

5 1/2 tablespoons sugar

1/4 teaspoon salt

1/2 teaspoon vanilla

Blanched and finely chopped almonds

Candied cherries

Process

Add butter to corn; beat white of egg until stiff; add sugar gradually; continue beating. Add to first mixture; add salt and vanilla. Drop from tip of teaspoon on a well buttered baking sheet one and one-half inches apart. With the spoon shape in circles and flatten with a knife, first dipped in cold water. Sprinkle with chopped nut meats and press a shred of candied cherry in top of each macaroon. Bake in a slow oven until daintily browned.

  • The Corn Cook Book. Hiller, Elizabeth O., comp.Chicago, New York [etc.] P.F. Volland company [c1918]

corn cook book vintage

Popcorn macaroons as part of the War effort – the First World War.

Popcorn good. Cookies good. Popcorn cookies….I just have to make enough popcorn to not eat it all before it’s time to make the cookies.

And since it’s hot, it’s only right that there be ice cream to go with the cookies – or is it cookies to go with the ice cream? It seems Mrs. Lincoln (of Boston Cooking School fame) was way ahead of the Ben and Jerry’s curve.

 

 

choc-chip-cookie-dough-detail

Cookie dough great add in – cookies – also great ice cream add in

Macaroon Ice-cream

Dry one dozen stale macaroons, roll or pound them fine and sift through a fine gravy strainer. Add them to ice-cream after either receipt* and flavored with extract of almond or sherry wine. Stir them in when the cream is partly frozen.

               Scald the cream if you wish a firm, solid cream.

               –Mrs. Lincoln. Frozen Dainties.White Mountain Freezer Co., NH. 1889. p. 13. Applewood Books.

  • The two previous receipts are Hollipin Ice-cream and Maraschino Ice-cream, which are both based on the Neapolitan Ice-cream, which has 1 qt. cream, 4 eggs,1 cup sugar and flavoring.

Mrs Lincoln frozen dainties

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Drive-In Day

June 6th is National Drive-In  Movie Day. Shouldn’t it be Drive-In NIGHT????

It’s not as easy to see a drive in movie as it used to be……

As I’ve mentioned before, popcorn put me through college….

And Kingston was where I made it.

We also got to see the movies. Or hear them . Not always both at the same time, but after six nights, you had a clue. And we could always come in on our night off and watch, so yes, I went to the Drive-In to WATCH the movies.

And eat free popcorn, freshly made.

It was at the Drive-In I saw Star Wars

Not knowing anything about Star Wars before it first aired…it seemed to have dropped out of the sky.

Image a summer night sky and then…

Just think about this movie on a giant screen against the night sky.

Movie Magic.

drive in

 

 

 

 

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Popcorn, Pilgrims….

Myth and Magic

Once upon a time, a long time ago…

John Howland pondering popcorn at the first Thanksgiving - from a scene from a 19th century novel

John Howland pondering popcorn at the first Thanksgiving …MYTH

CHAPTER XXVI.

THE FIRST THANKSGIVING DAY OF NEW ENGLAND.

The meal was a rude one looked upon with the dainty eyes and languid

appetites of to-day, but to those sturdy and heroic men and women it was

a veritable feast, and at its close Quadequina with an amiable smile

nodded to one of his attendants, who produced and poured upon the table

something like a bushel of popped corn,–a dainty hitherto unseen and

unknown by most of the Pilgrims.

All tasted, and John Howland hastily gathering up a portion upon a

wooden plate carried it to the Common house for the delectation of the

women, that is to say, for Elizabeth Tilley, whose firm young teeth

craunched it with much gusto.

Breakfast over, with a grace after meat that amounted to another

service,…..

STANDISH OF STANDISH : A Story of the Pilgrims By JANE G. AUSTIN Author of “A Nameless Nobleman,” “The Desmond Hundred,” “Mrs. BeauchampBrown,” “Nantucket Scraps,” “Moon Folk,” Etc., Etc.Boston and New York Houghton, Mifflin and Company The Riverside Press,Cambridge 1892 Copyright, 1889,by Jane G. Austin.All rights reserved

But the problem with myth, is that it GROWS….

… and then other myths grow from there.

Popcorn is American. Nobody but the Indians ever had popcorn, til after the Pilgrim Fathers came to America. On the first Thanksgiving Day, the Indians were invited to dinner, and they came, and they poured out on the table a big bagful of popcorn. The Pilgrim Fathers didn’t know what it was. The Pilgrim Mothers didn’t know, either. The Indians had popped it, but it probably wasn’t very good. Probably they didn’t butter it or salt it, and it would be cold and tough after they had carried it around in a bag of skins.

Farmer Boy by Laura Ingalls WIlder, p. 32.

Farmer Boy coverAnd who doesn’t want to believe Half-Pint?

laura6

Melissa Gilbert as Laura Ingalls in the TV show ‘Little House on the Prairie’

So although popcorn is a variety of corn that was not grown in New England before the nineteenth century, and therefore popcorn could NOT have been part of the first Thanksgiving, popcorn has a whole lotta cool in its past….even in the Little House in the Prairie series….like this:

You can fill a glass full to the brim with milk, and fill another glass of the same size brim full of popcorn, and then you can put all the popcorn kernel by kernel into the milk, and the milk will not run over. You cannot do this with bread. Popcorn and milk are the only two things that will go into the same place.

Farmer Boy, Chapter 3

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Craft Corn

I admit, when I saw the headline in the Dining Section of last Wednesday’s New York Times, I thought it was about playing with your food….christmas-crafts-garland_612

but not quite. Sometimes, you have to read the whole headline.

The actual headline: The Rise of Craft Popcorn. And it’s a very interesting story, about small farmers bringing back specialty popcorns, which now must be craft, no doubt because the term artisan has been so overused as to be meaningless.

For one thing, I learned that popcorn

Popcorn kernels

Popcorn kernels -Zea mays everta

is more closely related to flint corn then I thought before…

flint corn

Flint corn or Zea mays indurata – popcorn may actually be a variety of flint corn

 

Which is just in time for Pilgrim and popcorn stories. And Thanksgiving and Turkey stories.

They’re just not true – whether or not flint corn can beget popcorn or not – because no one in the 17th (or 18th) century mentions them. Most of them began in the 19th century which is 200 years too late to be timely, but they’re interesting.

John Howland pondering popcorn at the first Thanksgiving - from a scene from a 19th century novel

John Howland pondering popcorn at the first Thanksgiving – from a scene from a 19th century novel Standish of Standish

Jane Goodwin Austin’s Standish of Standish has this scenes – in 1889.

Jane Goodwin Austin, not to be confused with Jane Austen, the Pride and Prejudice author. Please.

Jane Goodwin Austin, not to be confused with Jane Austen, the Pride and Prejudice author. Please.

Turkey, popcorn and Thanksgiving. They way it never happened.

PaperBagTurkey3

Paperbag turkey with popcorn

directions to paperbag turkey here

The Turkey Shot Out of the Oven 

by Jack Prelutsky

The turkey shot out of the oven

and rocketed into the air,

it knocked every plate off the table

and partly demolished a chair.

It ricocheted into a corner

and burst with a deafening boom,

then splattered all over the kitchen,

completely obscuring the room.

It stuck to the walls and the windows,

it totally coated the floor,

there was turkey attached to the ceiling,

where there’d never been turkey before.

It blanketed every appliance,

it smeared every saucer and bowl,

there wasn’t a way i could stop it,

that turkey was out of control.

I scraped and I scrubbed with displeasure,

and though with chagrin as I mopped,

that I’d never again stuff a turkey

with popcorn that hadn’t been popped.

 

Something BIG Has Been Here written by Jack Prelutsky and illus. by James Stevenson, 1990.

You can’t pop popcorn inside a turkey. Use a covered pan for the best results.

and that doesn’t even begin to cover johnnycakes…..

Johnnycakes from the Kenyon Mills Facebook page - they way they like 'em in Rhode Island

Johnnycakes from the Kenyon Mills Facebook page – they way they like ’em in Rhode Island

and then there’s Indian Pudding, and Brown Bread and sampe and corn bread and …….it’s all grist for the mill…2014_SampeFest_Flyer

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Popcorn put me through college

More specifically, MAKING popcorn….

The Kingston Drive In Theatre - c. 1977. I was there then.

The Kingston Drive In Theatre – c. 1977. I was there then. The R didn’t always light up on the sign, so it was also the Dive In Theatre…..

But I also ate my fair share. Not from a package, please. Fresh. Hot. If it’s not hot, it isn’t really fresh.

Popcorn popping

Popcorn popping – kernel to delightful!

The popcorn I was raised on was the occasional Jiffy Pop. Jiffy Pop Popcorn and I are the same age. Frederick C. Mennen developed Jiffy Pop in 1958. But it wasn’t until the 1970’s that Harry Blackstone, Jr.  was telling us that Jiffy Popwas the magic treat, as much fun to make as it is too eat.

The Jiffy Pop story in pictures

The Jiffy Pop story in pictures

This is what I use at home now :

The Whirley Pop

The Whirley Pop – maybe it’s not as far from Jiffy Pop as I thought….

And then there are Pilgrim and popcorn stories….

It's emphatically NOT TRUE that there was popcorn at the first Thanksgiving

It’s emphatically NOT TRUE that there was popcorn at the first Thanksgiving

But Popcorn and Movies DO go together. Plimoth Cinema has popcorn – and I’ve made popcorn for them, too. The proof is in the pudding – I mean commercial – but I made Indian Pudding for them, too. Check out the commercial on their page…but don’t blink or you’ll miss me!

Plimoth Cinema is also raising money for a new projector – no new digital projector, no more movies. There’s a Kickstarter campaign at Plimoth Cinema Kickstarter.  One of the updates is another great video made by some modern day Pilgrims…..so pop some popcorn and start watching.

S’mores Popcorn

talk about your lily gilding…..

6 tablespoons butter
5 cups mini marshmallows

4 quarts fresh popped popcorn
1 cup honey graham cracker cereal
1 1/2 cups  chocolate chips

Honesty minute: I first saw this recipe on Martha Stewart Radio blog site, when Patrick  Evans-Hylton was a guest, which is how I discovered his Popcorn book, which I adore. I often (usually) just mix a batch of fresh popcorn with a half bag of mini marshmallows, half a box of  mini graham crackers (which I’m not sure were even being made in 2011, instead of the cereal) a half a bag of chocolate chips (the sort can vary – I love the dark, but white is nice and a mix is heavenly), toss the whole thing with melted butter (salted butter is important here) and then munch straight from the bowl without s’moring…..OR

  1.  Butter a 9-by-13-inch pan; set aside.
  2. Melt the butter over low heat. Add the marshmallows, stirring, until they are all melted.  Pour the marshmallow mixture over the popcorn to coat.
  3. Stir in the cereal and one cup of the chocolate chips.
  4. Transfer the popcorn mixture to the prepared pan. With buttered hands, press the mixture evenly into the pan; allow to cool slightly.
  5. Melt the remaining chocolate chips according to package instructions and drizzle the chocolate over the popcorn mixture. Allow to cool completely, 20 to 25 minutes, then cut into squares.

MSL radio Morning Living June 28, 2011

popcorn PHE

Popcorn – Patrick Evans-Hylton

 

 

 

 

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Waffles for supper

Meatless M0nday – unless if when you hear waffles, chicken isn’t far behind.

Chicken and waffles is not meatless, but a great supper any day of the week

Chicken and waffles is not meatless, but a great supper any day of the week

In keeping with my resolution to reduce food waste, I had to come up with a way to use the buttermilk left over from the Irish bread baking of last week.

I once tried to cross reference my various recipes for just this sort of occasion…it was a hopeless muddle. I just wanted to group all the 1 cup of buttermilk recipes, all the 2 tablespoons of tomato paste recipes, all the…you get the picture.

But because I was reading Marion Cunningham, she neatly solved this buttermilk conundrum for me.

A waffle iron was one of the best small appliances I ever indulged myself in. I’ve actually worn out several. I don’t buy the high-end semi-industrial machine.

This waffle iron is a beaut - but at 200 bucks...I won't eat 200 dollars worth of waffles in my lifetime!

This waffle iron is a beaut – but at 200 bucks…I won’t eat 200 dollars worth of waffles in my lifetime!

I wait for a sale at Benny’s or Target, and get a perfectly respectable machine for under $30. It  has always served well for years. Now that I make waffles less often (read: New Years Day and maybe once or twice in the year, as opposed to maybe 25 or 30 times a year) my current waffle iron should last for decades.

Waffles also have an historic element – you knew I’d be working the food history angle in here eventually –

Waffles as good time food c. early 17th century:

This is a detail from a Pieter Bruegel painting about Carnevale. Notice the waffles as headgear!

This is a detail from a Pieter Bruegel painting about Carnevale. Notice the waffles as gambling booty and  headgear!

This is a 17th century waffle iron from France - It had to be heated over the fire. It's hard to tell from this photo, this might be a wafer iron, which are waffles super thin, extra rich cousins

This is a 17th century waffle iron from France – It had to be heated over the fire. It’s hard to tell from this photo, this might be a wafer iron, which are waffles super thin, extra rich cousins.

 

CORNMEAL WAFFLES

1 cup cornmeal

1 ¾ cups AP flour

2 ½ teaspoons baking powder

½ teaspoon baking soda

1 teaspoon salt

3 eggs, separated

2 ½ cups buttermilk

4 tablespoons of butter, melted

3 tablespoons of sugar

  1. Start heating the waffle iron.
  2. Whisk together the cornmeal, flour, baking powder, baking soda and salt until well blended.
  3. In a separate bowl, beat together the egg yolks. Add the buttermilk and butter to the egg yolks, blending well.
  4. Combine the liquid mixture with the flour mixture, mixing well.
  5. Beat the egg whites in a separate bowl until stiff, slowly adding the sugar.
  6. Fold in the beaten egg whites.
  7. Spoon ½ cup waffle batter in the hot greased waffle iron.
  8. Bake until golden. It will smell like popcorn.
  9. Enjoy!

Makes 6-8 waffles, depending on the size of your iron.

The Fannie Farmer Cookbook. Twelfth edition. Edited by Marion Cunningham with Jeri Laber. Alfred A. Knopf: New York. 1979.p. 500.

the-fannie-farmer-cookbook-57448l1

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