Tag Archives: pie

Shrimp Girl

I’ve been so busy eating and cooking and eating and eating…..I haven’t been writing about it. Much of my cooking has been taking what was left and making into something new, something fresh, something different…..

Like leftover shrimp from Christmas Day….

shrimp-ring

There was some of THIS left….stay late at the party, score the leftovers!

As much as I love just picking and dunking shrimp to cocktail sauce…..and then thinking

“Is it TRUE that shrimp cocktail came about because of Prohibition?”

Or was that FRUIT cocktail????

I wanted a hot meal, but since the shrimp was already cooked, it just needed to be a re-heat element.

.

eatfeed

Eat Feed Autumn Winter – Anne Bramley

Anne Bramley also does the podcast EATFEED – I’m interviewed in the  PIE episode.

But I had pulled this book off the shelf, and sure as shooting – shrimp!

Citrus in Season

Chapter 18

Chili Lime Shrimp with Rice

Coconut Black Beans

pp. 148-151.

Since this was a light supper, I made a few revisions:

Chili Lime Rice with Shrimp (and coconut)

I made some rice, adding the zest of the lime and some hot pepper. When the rice was done I added the naked shrimp, chopped, and bit of coconut and served it in a rice bowl with a squeeze of the the now naked lime – note to self – next time squeeze citrus first and then zest.

rice-bowl

These are the rice bowls currently for sale at Williams-Sonoma. I bought a set of 12 for less , much less then a set of four now goers for, back in the olden days of the Carter Administration. I still have two.  Nine moves and three decades.

Anne also quotes Harry Nilsson… you know

which make me think of

william_hogarth_002

The Shrimp Girl is a painting by the English artist William Hogarth. It was painted around 1740–45, and is held by the National Gallery, London.

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Jag

Rare Iron Pie Crimper/jag with Whale-Tail Handle and 1794 Large Cent Wheel, American, first half 19th century, with notched border and distinctive semi-circular tail reminiscent of a whale’s tail, the wheel composed of an altered American 1794 large cent with depiction of Lady Liberty. Typical wear. L 5 1/2″.

pie-jag-shelburne-musuem

Maker unknown, Double Eagle scrimshaw pie jag(detail), mid-19th century, carved, incised ivory colored with red wax, brass and silver, H. 7 in., W. 4 in, D. 1 1/2 in. Gift of George G. Frelinghuysen. Shelburne Museum. Image by David Bohl.

Sometimes  I choose what to write. Sometimes it chooses me.I’ve had lots of pie events lately, so pie has been on my brain. Pie, pie accessories, pie recipes….I was going to write about pie jags….or cookies….or some combination thereof….

piecrustmoldwilton

Wilton has a pie crust rim mold, is cutting and pasting is out of your league

BUT

pie jags lead to just plain jag….

A dish of rice and beans.

I didn’t  know about jag until I moved to Plymouth, where it is so common to be customary on any sort of potluck table. Sometimes with beans, sometimes with pease, sometimes with linguica or other tube meat  – always hits the spot.

 

linquica-gaspars

Paula Peters wrote about it years ago in the Cape Cod Times Finding the Recipe for jag and more recently Paula Marcoux wrote about Jagacida for edible South Shore and South Coast Magazine. And here’s a wordpress blogger who writes of three generations of jag

I have rice, and an onion, and beans instead of pease…..and a pot to cook it in and some smoked paprika. Time to put on the rice and beans.

 

 

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Crantart

Fen grapes, marish worts, mosse-berries, moore-berries, fenberries, bearberries, croneberry, cramberries…..how many nick names can one little bouncing berry have?

cranberries

Whatever else they’ve been called, they’re all still cranberries. In 1672 John Josslyn suggests:

“Some make Tarts with them as with Goose Berries.”

gooseberry-330px-stachelbeeren

Gooseberries

stachelbeere_ribes_uva-crispa1

Red Gooseberries

Cranberry Tart – Precedence and Persistence

“Tartes of Gooseberries.

Lay your gooseberries in your crust, and put to them cinnamon and ginger,

sugar and a few small raisins put among them and cover them with a

cover.”

A Booke of Cookery with the Serving of the Table; A.W.; 1591;

page 28

Berries, cinnamon, ginger, sugar and small raisins between pastry. Bake is implied. Easy.

And somewhat familiar…..

CRANBERRY – RAISIN PIE

3 C raw cranberries

1 C raisins

1 ¼ C sugar

2 Tbsp. flour

¼ tsp salt

¾ C water

1 ½ tsp vanilla*

Pastry for a 2 crust 9 inch

Put the cranberries and raisins through food grinder.Place in saucepan and add all ingredients except vanilla.Cook over low heat until thick, and cranberries are cooked. Add vanilla and place in pie shell. Bake until crust is done. Dots of butter and nutmeats may be added on

– Florence H. Angley. A Book of Favorite Recipes. complied by the Ladies Solidarity of St. Joseph the Worker Church Hanson, Mass..1968. p. 52.

This is sometimes called Mock Cherry Pie.

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Filed under New England, Pie, The 17th century, The 1960"s

Pie Parade

The Pies!

The Pies!

A note on the judges – there was me, from Plimoth Plantation

me-pfm

 

 

There was Doris Cooper of Clarkson Potter Publishing

dac_headshot

 

and the third judge was Darra Goldstein    of Williams College and Cured magazine

darra-by-stefan-hi-res2

I’m pretty much listing  the pies as I found them on the tables…..This is all from my (incomplete) and rather hastily scribbled notes and there are a few smears…..pie judging is not for the dainty or the fainthearted.

I also didn’t write down who made what pie, which I didn’t know until the prizes were being given out. Several people made more then one pie.

There were several not quite pies….

  1. Cherry Claflouti – a batter, not a crust. This is not the actual entry, which was more attractive  …clafouti_august_2008
  2. Medieval Brie Tart – Yes – Medieval Brie , although the recipe was old, the ingredients were fresh. From To the King’s Taste by Lorna Sass.More on this in a later post  kings-taste-sass
  3. Apple Tart – this was a French Apple tart – rectangular and lovely. Crisp golden pastry…
  4. Corn and Zucchini quiche – This had an incredible Autumnal Yankee taste – first impression. I know, zukes and Yankees….but that is what my mouth told me. And now for the Pie Pies:
  5. Maple Walnut Pie – New England’s answer to Pecan Pie…..
  6. Smith Family Chocolate Pie – this was a cream pie with chocolate added. When I first looked at it, I almost thought it was pate – but the smell was wrong, and the label …. a good name makes ALL the difference sometimes!
  7. Chocolate Meringue Nut Surprise  – two chocolate pies! – This had a lovely meringue  and a chocolate custard base, as well as nuts. It wasn’t until the third taste that I found the surprise – BLUEBERRIES -Surprise! –  little tiny wild blueberries between the chocolate and the meringue. This is why you need THREE bites.
  8. Apple Butternut – sliced apples and diced butternut squash . Very traditional. For a long time apple and squash/pumpkin were sliced up together in pies.I’ll probably do another post on the apple/pumpkin connection, too.
  9. Apple Bread Pie – had quite a bit going for it- but a better name might be ‘Ginger Apple Bread Pie’ This was an apple pie with gingerbread spicing….but I was looking for the bready filling…
    pie2016brandonsmith-applebreadpie

    Mardi Smith took these pictures and shared them on Facebook Grandmother’s Old Fashioned Two Crust Lemon pie – great crust and great lemon filling.

     

  10. Grandmother’s Old Fashioned Two Crust Lemon pie – great crust and great lemon filling.

    shaker_lemon_pie

    Shakers did 2 crust lemon pies….this is not the entry pie. Next contest – take a camera!

  11. Country Rumpkin –  Here are my bite reactions:
            1. This would be a great cocktail!
            2. Why ISN”T this a cocktail – a rum and pumpkin cocktail?
            3. This is one great Pumpkin Pie – and I swear it wasn’t the rum talking. I may put rum into all my pumpkin pie from here on out.Alice Parker thought with the rain there might not be enough pies, so she baked one, and dressed like a gentleman – Alfred Parker  – to abide by the rules. And she played the piano.
               

               

  12. Ginger Apple Moose Pie – The moose, to our great relief , was not the meat within, but the antler shapes cut out on top.
pie2016davidsmithlarkthwing-willcosbyalice-applemoosepie

Will holding his prize winning pie –  golden, gorgeous, every element was above.

pie2016poster

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Judgement Day

No, not THAT Judgement day –

PIE Contest judging day!!!!!

THIS Pie contest

pie2016poster

So much talent

Such mighty fine pies

pie2016parade

Pie Parade – I’m bringing up the rear with Alice Parker’s pie, since she – as Alfred Parker, is playing the piano and didn’t have a hand free. Tinky is in the hat, singing like a bird.

Like any good pie, this story has more than one slice…..

thelma-and-louise-car

Our car had a roof, so we were dry in the rain. And we had fall foliage. And no Brad Pitt.But we were driving towards PIE!

pie-lemon-merinque-sliceSlice one – This year I did not go alone. Baker Tani wanted to go to taste pies, too. So early in the morning we left, driving out from coastal Plymouth to the Hills of Hawley. Three hours and Fall Foliage and maybe we got a little lost up the mountain later, we get there.There was also rain and Honey Dew coffee and Doughnuts and the Mohawk Trail and  Thelma and Louise-ishness. At least the part about 2 women on a road trip. Neither of us could remember much about the movie, just the image of  two women in a car, one with a scarf. And Brad Pitt.We remembered Brad Pitt.

 

thelma-louise-brad

pie-lemon-merinque-sliceSlice 2 – The judging of pies

pie-lemon-merinque-sliceSlice 3 – Ham and Bean Community lunch

pie-lemon-merinque-sliceSlice 4 – The entertainment after lunch and before the winners were announced. This including the singing of the town song…..

whoville-xmas-morning

There’s a certain Whos of Whoville  vibe about the town song

pie-lemon-merinque-slice Slice 5 – The Winners (there are no losers in PIE!) and the prizes

pie-lemon-merinque-sliceSlice 6 – The PIES

 

To be continued……..

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Filed under Autumn, New England, Pie

Piece of Pie

Pizza Pie, that is.

Is there a point where pizza and pie are redundant?

Maybe the point would be at the point of the wedge…..

pizza slice

Piece of pizza – New York style slices

But then there is Pie Pie….

Pumpkin_Pie

Pumpkin Pie

SOOOOOOO,

When you have cooked squash/pumpkin and pizza dough both in your freezer at the same time and it’s also time to think of what’s for supper…….Time for Pumpkin Pizza Pie

Two Great Tastes that Taste Great Together!

 

PUMPKIN PIZZA PIE

2 rounds of pizza dough, rolled out to 10″

1/2  pound cooked squash

1 can Ro-Tell – drain it and drink the juice or save it for soup…

rotel

They were on sale last week – I was thinking of adding them into chili or soup

olive oil

grated  mozzarella or cheddar

grated Romano or Parmesan

  1. Put some oil in a pan. Add the drained Rotel, the squash and a clove or 2 (or 4) of garlic. Any finely diced veg or 2 would do well here now – pepper, onion, celery even a carrot. I had a roasted beet I didn’t think of til it was out of the oven…what a color THAT would have been!

  2. Cook to color, soften. Mash it down,nothing too big, too hard, too lumpy.

  3. Let the mixture cool a bit.

  4. Turn up the oven to 450-500°. Let it be hot.

  5. If you have a lump of cheese, shred it now. Shredded cheese was also on sale, and a name brand, not the store brand stuff. I bought it in spite of the chatter lately about wood pulp et al.in assorted cheese product. This one had potato starch, visible, all over the place potato starch, and plenty of it.  Next time I shred my own.  

  6. Sprinkle some grated Romano or Parmesan in a little circle in the middle. This is a trick I learned from Ian C. at a wood-fired oven workshop years ago.  It makes your first bite extra savory.This doesn’t work on pizzas that aren’t circles to be cut in wedges, although a little extra flavorful cheese underneath almost always works.  

  7. Divide the vegetable sauce between the 2 pizzas and spread across the dough.

  8. Sprinkle any fresh seasoning herbs may want now : fresh basil or fresh thyme. Sage, in very small amounts works with the squash. I had some fresh rosemary, and it only took a couple of pinches, minced fine.

  9. Top  with the shredded cheese. The cheese should not out weigh the rest of the topping….

  10. Put in a hot oven for 10 minutes and then check. It should be golden brown on top and bottom. If not, put it back in for a couple of more minutes – your oven will not be the same as mine! My oven took about 6 minutes more. If I wanted well-done pizza (don’t laugh, I know people who like things COOKED) keep  in in even a few minutes more. Don’t keep it in so long the Fire Department comes over to see what’s in the oven.

  11. Take out of the oven, cool for a minute or two (It helps the cheese set and keeps you from burning yourself). Cut in slices and serve. I froze my leftovers for another day (which was more then one other day, the last one of which was today).

  12. Glorious colors, tomato and pumpkin, two New World vine fruits together!

 

 

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Filed under Eating, Italian, Pantry, Pizza, Recipe, squash

11 Pie-ers Pieing

Oh, It’s PIPES?

MagrittePipe

Magritte – This is not a pipe – at least not the sort the song means

Angel_playing_bagpipes,_St._Giles,_Edinburgh

Imagine 10 more piping…

Why aren’t there more PIES in the Twelve Days of Christmas?????

Christmas is not just the retail season leading up to Xmas day…it’s also the twelve days following.Christmas Pies used to reign where there is now Christmas Pudding  and Christmas Cookies…Christmas Pie also went by Shred Pie or Mincemeat Pie…..but now the meat is mostly missing, and sometimes they’re known as Mince Pie.

If you eat a mince pie on each of the 12 days of Christmas, you’ll have good luck in each of the 12 months ahead. It’s even better luck if you eat one mince pie in each of  12 different houses -at least that way you won’t wear out your welcome.

We did not have mince pie at  Christmas this year. But the Christmas season isn’t over YET, so there’s time…..

Sometimes Mincemeat Pies were big, raised pies.

pie spanish pieA Pereda 1678

detail of a raised pie, Antonio de. Pereda, 1678

To make minced Pies or Chewits of a Leg of Veal, Neats-Tongue, Turkey, or Capon.

Take to a good leg of veal six pound of beef-suet, then take the leg of veal, bone it, parboil it, and mince it very fine when it is hot; mince the suet by it self very fine also, then when they are cold mingle them together, then season the meat with a pound of sliced dates, a pound of sugar, an ounce of nutmegs, an ounce of pepper, an ounce of cinamon, half an ounce of ginger, half a pint of verjuyce, a pint of rose-water, a preserved orange, or any peel fine minced, an ounce of caraway-comfits, and six pound of currans; put all these into a large tray with half a handful of salt, stir them up all together, and fill your pies, close them up, bake them, and being baked, ice them with double refined sugar, rose-water, and butter.

Make the paste with a peck of flour, and two pound of butter boil’d in fair water or liquor, make it up boiling hot.

Robert May. The Accomplist Cook. 1674

 

RobertMayTheAccomplishtCookFrontispiece

Somewhere along the way in the 18th century Brandy and Other Spirits found their way into mincemeat. Often, quite a bit of spirits, ostensibly for ‘preservation’. Truth be told, much of the newly Industrialized World was in quite a pickle through the mid-17oo’s and the 1800’s. Prohibition was  not for naught, as it were.

To make mince-pies the best way.

Take three pounds of suet shred very fine, and chopped as small as possible; two pounds of raisins stoned, and chopped as fine as possible; two pounds of currants nicely picked, washed, rubbed, and dried at the fire; half a hundred of fine pipins, pared, cored and chopped small; half a pound of sugar pounded fine; a quarter an ounce, of mace, a quarter of an ounce of cloves, two large nutmegs, all beat fine; put all together into a great pan, and mix it well together with half a pint of brandy, and half a pint of sack ; put it down close in a stone pot, and it will keep good for four months.

1740. Hannah Glasse. The Art of Cookery Made Plain and Easy.

Art_of_Cookery_frontispiece

and one more historic recipe…

MINCEMEAT (Mrs. Brotherton’s Recipe).

INGREDIENTS – 6 lemons, ½ lb. of apples, 1 lb. of raisins, weighed after being stoned,1 lb. of currants, 1 lb. of sugar, ½ lb. of fresh butter, 4 ozs. each of candied orange and citron.

Mode. – Grate the yellow rind, cut the lemons in two, and squeeze out the juice. Boil the rinds in spring water till tender, but not soft, changing the water 4 or 5 times to take out the bitterness, and putting a large tablespoon of salt in the water in which they are boiled. When done, drain the water from them, and take out the seeds and the skins, then chop them with the raisins in a wooden bowl. When finely chopped, add the currants, sugar, the apples, previously prepared as for sauce, the grated rind of the lemons, the juice, ½ a tablespoonful of cayenne pepper, a small teaspoonful of mace, another of powdered cinnamon, 15 drops almond flavor, the candied orange and citron, cut in thin slices, and lastly the butter, melted, and poured in.

This mincemeat may have brandy or other spirits added to it the same as ordinary mincemeat, and it keeps fresh longer; but, as teetotalism and vegetarianism so often go hand in hand, we have not put it amongst the ingredients.*

The pastry recipe may be used for the mince pies or ordinary puff-paste.

Average cost, for this quantity, 3s.

Seasonable at Christmas.

-1903. Mrs. Beeton’s Cookery Book : A Household Guide. J.S. Doige, Blackpool (fasc. Rigby Pub. Ltd, 1981.) p. 185, section: Vegetarianism. * bold mine kmw

Mrs Beetons pb

This is one of the Mrs Beeton’s that I own. I got this on my first trip to London in the early ’80’s on a shop on Charring Cross Road.

Mince_Pie

Modern day Mince Pie are often small pies

Tuesday January 5th is the 11th day of Christmas, so get mincing!

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Wicked WayBack Pumpkin Pies

pumpkin-dream-pie-recipe-1959

I made this pie for many Thanksgivings…and then there was a Cool-Whip version, and yes, I made that, too. And so many other pumpkin pies.

But I was thinking of pies even more WayBack then the 1960’s.

like the 1660’s

1653

Tourte of pumpkin.

Boile it with good milk, pass it through a straining pan very thick, and mix it with sugar, butter, a little salt and if you will, a few stamped almonds; let all be very thin. Put it in your sheet of paste; bake it. After it is baked, besprinkle it with sugar and serve.”

– Francois Pierre La Varenne. The French Cook [1653], Translated into English in 1653 by I.D.G., Introduced by Philip and Mary Hyman [East Sussex: Southover Press} 2001 (p. 199-200)

1655

To make a Pumpion Pye.

Take about a half a pound of Pumpion and slice it, a handful of Tyme, a little Rosemary, Parsley, and sweet Marjaoram, stripped off the stalk, and chop very small. Then take Cinamon, Nutmeg, Pepper, and six Cloves, and beat them; take ten Eggs and beat them, them mix them, and beat them altogether, and put in as much sugar as you think fit, then fry them like a froize; after it is fryed, let it stand till it be cold, then fill your Pye, take sliced Apples thin roundways, and lay a row of the Froiz, and then a layer of Apples, with Currans betwixt the layer while your pye is fitted, and put in a good deal of sweet butter before you close it; when the pye is baked, take six yolks of Eggs, some white Wine or Verjuyce, & make a Caudle of this, but not too thick; cut up the lid and put it in, stir them well together whilst the Eggs and Pumpions be not perceived, so serve it up.”

– W.M. The Compleat Cook. E. Tyler and R. Holt for Nath. Brooke: London, (1655) 1671. Prospect Books: London. 1984

Pompion Pie baked by Kristi Leigh Schkade 10-2015

Pompion Pie baked by Kristi Leigh Schkade 10-2015

1660

To make a Pumpion Pye.

Take a pound & slice it, a handful of a time, a little rosemary, and sweet marjoram stripped off the stalks, chop them small, then take cinamon, nutmeg, pepper, & a few cloves all beaten together, also ten eggs, & beat them, then and beat them all together, with as much sugar as you think fit, then fry it like a froise, after it is fried let it stand till it is cold, then fill your pye after this manner. Take sliced apples sliced thin round ways, and lay a layer of the froise, and a layer of the apples, with currans betwixt the layers. While your pie is fitted, put in a good deal of sweet butter before you close it. When the pye is baked, take the yolks of eggs, some white wine or verjuyce and make a caudle of this, but not too thick, cut up the lid, put it in, and stir them well together whilst the eggs and pumpion be not perceived, and so serve it up.”

– May, Robert. The Accomplisht Cook, or the Art and Mystery of Cookery. London: Robert Hartford. 1671 (third edition). p. 224.

1670

XCIII. To make a Pompion-Pie.

Having your Paste ready in your Pan, put in your Pompion pared and cut in thin slices, then fill up your Pie with sharp Apples, and a little Pepper, and a little salt, then close it, bake it, then butter it, serve it in hot to the Table.

– Hannah Wooley. The Queen-like Closet. 1670.p. 235.

CXXXII. To make a Pumpion-Pie

Take a Pumpion, pare it, and cut it in thin slices, dip it in beaten Eggs and Herbs shred small, and fry it till it be enough, then lay it into a Pie with Butter, Raisins, Currans, Sugar and Sack, and in the bottom some sharp Apples, when it is baked, butter it and serve it in.

– Hannah Wooley. The Queen-like Closet. 1670. p. 256

The Pumpkin - Bartolomeo Bimbi - second half 17th centuryi

Zucca – The Pumpkin – Bartolomeo Bimbi – 1711

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A Slice of Happy

PFM’s 1st Annual PIE CONTEST!!
Thursday, August 6th, 3:30pm

In honor of National Farmers Market Week, The Plymouth Farmers’ Market invites submissions from vendors and customers for our 1st Annual Pie Contest! Pies will be judged by a Guest Judge Panel, then slices will be sold for $4 with all proceeds benefiting PFM’s Culinary Insights and health-based programming in the community.

Categories:

Most Beautiful
Best Kid Made Pie
Best Gluten-Free Pie
Best Use of Seasonal/Local Ingredients

GREAT PRIZES!!

PIE DROP OFF: 2pm-3:30pm
JUDGING: 3:30pm
PIE SLICING: 4pm

Sign up beforehand or just bring a pie last minute!
Please bring a recipe card that lists all ingredients.
For food safety reasons, NO dairy-based pies (like custards) are permitted (though butter in your crust is fine).

Email Mia at miab883@gmail.com to sign up in advance (name, email and category, please) or just bring a pie!

We can’t wait!

Plymouth Farmers' Market's photo.
And just who is amongst those judging?????

MOI

 Happy Happy Joy Joy Dance.

See you on Thursday!

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Pi Days, Fry Days

First, some follow up from Pi Days, part I…

RINGO ROOTS

Not the remaining Beatle..

Guess who has a new album coming out at the end of this month? Postcards from Paradise

Guess who has a new album coming out at the end of this month? Postcards from Paradise available 31 March

but Eringo roots, eringo also known as Sea Holly

Sea Holly - eringo - growing on the dunes

Sea Holly – eringo – growing on the dunes

Ivan Day at Food History  has sooo much more on eringos – he’s cooked it…..

Perhaps you remember this from high school English class.

MISTRESS FORD

Sir John! art thou there, my deer? my male deer?

FALSTAFF

My doe with the black scut! Let the sky rain
potatoes; let it thunder to the tune of Green
Sleeves, hail kissing-comfits and snow eringoes; let
there come a tempest of provocation, I will shelter me here.

– William Shakespeare. The Merry Wives Of Windsor Act V Scene V

I hadn’t remembered that it was “Snow Eringoes” – rather apt for this endless winter. Boston has – and winter isn’t actually over, so, SO FAR received 108.6 inches of the fluffy white stuff and Plymouth has had MORE….that’s  nine foot of snow shoveling. I will add ‘snow eringoes’ (which Spellcheck would really rather be ‘snow dingoes’) to the general snow vocabulary.

But, on to apple pies to fry

To fry Applepyes.

Take apples and pare them, and chop them very small, beat in a little cinnamon, a little ginger, and some sugar, a little rosewater, take your paste, roul it thin, and make them up as big pasties as you please, to hold a spoonful or a little lesse of your apples, and so stir them with butter not too hastily least they be burned.

  • W.I., Gent. A True Gentlewoman’s Delight. Falconwood ed. p. 8.

NOTES:What W.I, Gent is suggesting is that you

  1. pare some apples and chop them small
  2. add some powdered (beaten in a mortar with a pestle) cinnamon, ginger and sugar with a little rosewater [did you know that apples and roses are in the same botanical family – they really go very nicely together]
  3. Your paste is your pastry – a  nice buttery based pastry works well here.
  4. He says make them as big as you please – think coat buttons versus hand pies – raviolis or pierogies..

    I'm thinking several of these little filled pasta (pasta means paste....the apple pies are sweet....)would be nice

    I’m thinking several of these little filled pasta (pasta means paste….the apple pies are sweet….)would be nice

  5.   A spoonful or less for the filling – wet the edges and pinch them together good – use a fork in the modern kitchen – you don’t want these pretty babies falling apart in the frying pan.
  6. Put some butter in your frying pan – medium heat – you want to melt the butter and cook the pastry, not burn it.
  7. A sprinkle of sugar as they come out of the pan would not be amiss…you don’t want to use so much butter that they need to be blotted or drained.

How to make Apple-pyes to Fry.

Take about a dozen pippins, pare them, cut them, and almost cover them with water, and almost a pound of sugar, let them boyl on a gentle fire, close covered, with a stick of cinnamon, minced orange pill, a little dillseed beaten, rosewater, when this is cold and stiff, make it into a little pastie with rich paste.

  • William Rabisha. The Whole Body of Cookery, Dissected. p. 201.

NOTES:

  • Pippin is a kind of apple (generally it’s a non-specific variety)
  • This time you peel and cut and make applesauce out of them, with LOTS of sugar and a piece of cinnamon, orange peel and dillseed, and again the rosewater. Caraway seed is also very nice with apples. You can beat – or grind it to a powder, before you add it..
  • A rich paste is one made with lots of butter, and maybe an egg yolk, like a pate sucree  click here to see Martha Stewart’s version.
  • Again make up into little pies and fry in butter….enjoy!

If you’re interested in more about Pies, there is a National Pie Council…it’s America, there’s a group for everything!

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Filed under Recipe, The 17th century, winter