Tag Archives: penne

Down the Tubes

Tubular pastas, that is.

I went into the sandwich shop, and they had a supper special – meatball or eggplant with ziti.

Ziti_(cropped)

This is what I’m looking for.

I looked in the case and I could see the meatballs and the eggplant…

and a big tray of penne.

Penne_all'arrabbiata

This is what I see – can you see that they’re not quite the same?

And then I was confused – where’s the ziti?  It turns out it was right THERE, even though it was penne and not really ziti .

Am I getting too picky in my old age? Is there a difference between the two?

Back to the books…

.

Pastabydesign

Pasta by Design by George L. Legendre, 2011.

and

geometry of pasta

Geometry of Pasta Caz Hildebrand & Jacob Kenedy, 2010

 

   Penne:

Dimensions:

Length: 2.12 in.

Width: 0.4 in

Wall thickness: 1mm

Synonyms – mostacciolo (little mustaches); mostaccioloi rigati; penne a candela, penne di natale/natalini; penne di ziti/zitoni, pennoni

They are hollow cylinders with the ends cut at an angle (like a quill pen)…..

penne,_cooked_and_uncooked800px

“Penne should not be confused with Italian ziti, but they often are. In the States, a popular dish of baked pasta referred to as “baked ziti” is in fact made from either the much shorter penne …or American ziti – tubular pasta like smooth rigatoni.p.194 Geometry of Pasta.

According to Past By Design :“A versatile pasta, penne rigate (grooved quills) come from Campania, in southern Italy, and belong to the pasta corta (short pasta) family.” p. 124.

Penne_custom-Geometry of Pasta

Penne in Geometry of Pasta

 

 Ziti

Dimensions

Length: 2 in.

Width: 0.4 in

Wall thickness: 1.25 mm

Similar form: ziti candelati

“Intrinsically Neapolitan, ziti cannot be separated from marriages. The word in fact means “the betrothed” or “the bridegroom”, and ziti are invariably served as the first course of a wedding lunch.” p. 282 Geometry of Pasta

ziti napolean

 

“A pasta reserved for banquets and special occasions, ziti (‘grooms’ or ‘brides’ in Italian dialect) originate from Sicily. Tradition has it that they should be broken by hand before being tossed into boiling water.”)p. 196.Pasta By Design

and since we’ve going down the Tubes…..

Rigatoni

Dimensions:

Length:1.8 in.

Width: 0.6 in.

Wall thickness: 1mm

(PBD – “Members of the pasta corta (short pasta) branch, and originally from southern Italy,….p. 148.)

rigatoni_geo ofpasta

Rigatoni from the Geometry of Pasta

By the way – the PENNE was delizio!

 

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Olive U

Oh, yes I do.

Little olive, I love you.

 

Olea eurpaea Kobler

Olea eurpaea Kobler

Although in my kitchen, they often look more like this:Pastene_pitted_black_olivesThe problem is, once I open a can, I can eat a can full.  In a very short time. Let’s just say, there isn’t a storage issue…often not even a serving issue….

So I buy olives when I planning to sue them IN things, and then I can enjoy them over several days, which in the end, is more enjoyable.

Olives in a sauce, and some olives in a salad….

Here’s a story for a sauce, according to wiki:

According to Annarita Cuomo, writer for Il Golfo, a daily newspaper serving the Italian islands of Ischia and Procida, sugo alla puttanesca was invented in the 1950s by Sandro Petti, co-owner of Rancio Fellone, a famous Ischian restaurant and nightspot

In the February 17th, 2005 edition of the newspaper, Cuomo says the moment of inspiration came, when near closing one evening, Petti found a group of customers sitting at one of his tables. Petti was low on ingredients and told them he didn’t have enough to make them a meal. They complained that it was late and they were hungry. “Facci una puttanata qualsiasi (Make any kind of garbage),” they insisted. In this usage, puttanata is an Italian noun meaning something worthless. It derives from the Italian word for whore, puttana.

At the time, Petti had nothing more than four tomatoes, two olives and some capers; the basic ingredients for the sugo. “So I used them to make the sauce for the spaghetti,” Petti told Cuomo.

Later, Petti included this dish on his menu as spaghetti alla puttanesca.

Some versions include anchovies, but I usually make this without the little fish.

Pasta Puttanesca

Olive oil (two swirls around the pan)
4 smooshed garlic cloves
1 small onion, diced
1 28 oz can whole tomatoes (I like lots of chunky bits – use crushed tomatoes if you don’t OR if you’re topping spaghetti or another finer pasta shape)
Salt
½ cup pitted, chopped black olives (or more….)
1 Tablespoon capers
1 tsp red hot pepper flakes (more to sprinkle on top, if you like it hot – it keeps getting hotter, so don’t over-do if you’ll be saving some for another meal)
1/3 cup chopped parsley (or half a supermarket bunch, which seems to vary with the season and how much rain wherever THAT bunch of parsley was grown) OR 6-8 fresh basil leaves, shredded
1 # penne – or another sturdy pasta with nooks and crannies
Grating cheese

1 Put on the pot of water to cook the pasta in.
2 Swirl the olive oil in another pan; bring to medium heat and add the onions
3 When the onions begin to soften, add the garlic.
4 Add the tomatoes, squishing them through your fingers to make good sized chunks. Pour in the liquid from the can.
5 Season with salt, and simmer on low.
6 When the pasta water comes to the boil, salt that and boil the penne until al dente.
7 Add the olives, the capers, the parsley (or basil) and the red pepper flakes to the tomatoes.
8 Save out 1 cup of the pasta, drain the penne.
9 Add the penne to the sauce (or vice versa, depending on your pot/pan situation). Add some of the save water if the sauce needs thinning.
10 Serve with grating cheese.

Pasta Puttanesca

Pasta Puttanesca

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