Tag Archives: pease

Jag

Rare Iron Pie Crimper/jag with Whale-Tail Handle and 1794 Large Cent Wheel, American, first half 19th century, with notched border and distinctive semi-circular tail reminiscent of a whale’s tail, the wheel composed of an altered American 1794 large cent with depiction of Lady Liberty. Typical wear. L 5 1/2″.

pie-jag-shelburne-musuem

Maker unknown, Double Eagle scrimshaw pie jag(detail), mid-19th century, carved, incised ivory colored with red wax, brass and silver, H. 7 in., W. 4 in, D. 1 1/2 in. Gift of George G. Frelinghuysen. Shelburne Museum. Image by David Bohl.

Sometimes  I choose what to write. Sometimes it chooses me.I’ve had lots of pie events lately, so pie has been on my brain. Pie, pie accessories, pie recipes….I was going to write about pie jags….or cookies….or some combination thereof….

piecrustmoldwilton

Wilton has a pie crust rim mold, is cutting and pasting is out of your league

BUT

pie jags lead to just plain jag….

A dish of rice and beans.

I didn’t  know about jag until I moved to Plymouth, where it is so common to be customary on any sort of potluck table. Sometimes with beans, sometimes with pease, sometimes with linguica or other tube meat  – always hits the spot.

 

linquica-gaspars

Paula Peters wrote about it years ago in the Cape Cod Times Finding the Recipe for jag and more recently Paula Marcoux wrote about Jagacida for edible South Shore and South Coast Magazine. And here’s a wordpress blogger who writes of three generations of jag

I have rice, and an onion, and beans instead of pease…..and a pot to cook it in and some smoked paprika. Time to put on the rice and beans.

 

 

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It’s not easy being green….

when you’re a vegetable trying to grow in New England in February.

There are peas – dried peas left from the harvest back in August…and pease will be the queen of the day at Plymouth Farmers Market this  Thursday at the Taste of Plimoth table, where I’ll be demonstrating pease pottage and a pea tendril salad, 17th century recipes for a 21st century kitchen.  Easy-Peasey. It just 0ccured to me that Taste of Plimoth is ultimate Throwback Thursday.green peaseBut something growing? Something fresh? No such luck. Not without a greenhouse. Or a hoop-house. Or a really sunny windowsill.

As the day get longer, minute by minute, craving something a little green is the real harbinger as Spring. I can only be soooo conflicted about eating lettuces from California or Florida..sometimes I just need the green.

Salad…..salad means spring is a-coming.

Salad with almonds and orange perfume

¼ cup olive oil (a nice fruity one)

2 Tbl wine vinegar (she suggests sherry – check your pantry for something nice)

Pinch of ground cumin (I like a generous pinch – let your nose lead you)

Salt and pepper

1 garlic clove, peeled and crushed

1 small onion (she says medium) cut into very thin slices and soaked in water to take some of the hurt away

Zest of 1 orange (this is the secret ingredient that makes it perfume)

**

2 Tbl flat leafed parsley, chopped

4 handfuls of bite sized greens or 4 of whatever size is your serving size

12 roasted almonds, coarsely chopped

almond blossoms and fruit - this just doesn't grow around here

almond blossoms and fruit – this just doesn’t grow around here

  1. Mix the oil, vinegar, cumin, salt, pepper, garlic, onion (drain it if you’ve soaked it – if you like raw onion or it’s mild, like a Vidalia you might not need this. I always need it – cooked onions are better to me then raw ones ever prove to be) and orange zest together in in a small jar and shake to mix.
  2. Mix the parsley and the greens together.
  3. Add dressing and toss.
  4. Top with almonds.
  5. Serves 4, unless it’s the main course of supper, then 2.
  6. In trying to make this work as a single serving, there is the problem  of getting stuck with 1/2 of an onion and 1/2 the zest of an orange ( or would that be zest of one orange?), so I make a dressing in a jar and use it as I need it, usually over 2 meals.  I usually eat the orange (maybe with a little drip of honey) after the salad for supper the first night, and the rest for lunch the next day. Unless I eat the orange right away with a few almonds as the starter to supper. One hot hard-boiled egg and a slice of bread rounds out the meal.
  7. Enjoy!

Viana La Place. Unplugged Kitchen. William Morrow and Company. 1996. p. 118.

oranges

A little ray of winter sunshine

 

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