Tag Archives: New York Times

It’s Christmas Time in the Kitchen

Christmas time in the kitchen is all about the

cookies

 

The words of Silver Bells just beg to be re-written for our own versions of the holiday.

silver-bell-cookies-pillsbury

Silver Bells cut out cookies from Pillsbury

Even Vogue magazine is about cookies this month…..

A Baker’s Tour of Europe’s Finest Holiday Cookies

by Oliver Strand

european-cookies-2-large

This is the illustration from Vogue

AND….

New York Times Style magazine has this article:

Baking Sweets From Childhood Tales

littlehouse-xmas-ill-06tmag-13look_sign-t_ca0-master768

This illustration from “Little House on the Prairie” shows all it took to make Christmas perfect for Laura and Mary: two heart-shaped cakes, two tin cups, two peppermint sticks and two pennies — one for each girl. Credit Garth Williams, Little House on the Prairie, from group of four, 1953: Christmas Stockings/Copyright Garth Williams 1953; renewed 1981/Image courtesy Heritage Auctions

from the article In Praise of the Good Enough

And today, 12/12 is Ma Ingalls birthday!

ma-ingalls

Today is Ma Ingalls’ birthday! 177 years ago on this day, Caroline Lake Quiner (later to become Caroline “Ma” Ingalls) was born in the Milwaukee area of Wisconsin, the fifth of seven Quiner children. Some said that baby Caroline was the first non-native American baby to be born in the area.

In this picture, Caroline is seated next to her husband, Charles Ingalls.

Happy Birthday, Ma!

Laura Ingalls Wilder Memorial Society

Cookies I’ve written about:

Italian Cookies

S’Wonderful (S cookies)

Oh, Joy! Chocolate Coconut Macaroons with Almonds

Wine with a Twist (cookies)

Oatmeal Raisin cookies

The Cool Cookies

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At The Fishhouses

painting by Elizabeth Bishop

At the Fishhouses

To the Editor:

I wonder what was in David Orr’s mind when he decided to close his column about Ben Lerner’s “The Hatred of Poetry” (On Poetry, Aug. 28) by lifting his closing paragraph, practically word for word, from Elizabeth Bishop’s poem “At the Fishhouses.” He does Bishop’s gorgeously lyrical poem a huge disservice by pretending to pass it off as his own prose, which of course Bishop would have never approved, and neither do I.

FRANK LOPRESTI

KENT, CONN.

Well, well, well, Mr Orr.

Fie

Fie and for shame

Fie and for double shame

At the Fishhouses

“At the Fishhouses” from The Complete Poems, 1927-1979 by Elizabeth Bishop. © 1979, 1983 by Alice Helen Methfessel. Used by permission of Farrar, Straus and Giroux, LLC. All rights reserved. http://www.fsgbooks.com
Source: The Complete Poems (Farrar Straus and Giroux, 1983)
 ebishop
Elizabeth Bishop (February 8, 1911 – October 6, 1979) was an American poet and short-story writer. She was Consultant in Poetry to the Library of Congress from 1949 to 1950, the Pulitzer Prize winner for Poetry in 1956,[1] the National Book Award winner in 1970, and the recipient of the Neustadt International Prize for Literature in 1976.
Now I must squeeze in a library visit to read more of her work.(wiki)
ebishop-poems
And her correspondence with Robert Lowell.
words-in-the-air
And look at her paintings.

Thank-you, Mr Lopresti, for bringing this wonderful artist to my attention.

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See Poem

Renoir – 1879 Seascape

The hurricane is a statement and not a watch or a warning,  but the wind is gusty, the sky is grey and there are whitecaps in the harbor…Yep, it’s still Summer, but it wants to be Fall in New England.

On a related note….

New York Times Book Review. August 28, 2016. On Poetry/ David Orr.

“In Loath with the Lyric” p. 16. Review of Ben Lerner’s The Hatred of Poetry.

        “Let’s forget the distance between my isolated archipelago and your bustling, workaday neighborhood, and let me tell you about how, where I sit, the ocean seems suspended above the rounded gray and blue-gray stones, how I have seen it over and over, the same sea, the same, slightly, indifferently swinging above the stones, and about how, if you should dip your hand in, your wrist would ache immediately, your bones would begin to ache and your hand would burn as if the water were a transmutation of fire that feeds on stones and burns with a dark gray flame.”

Gauguin-seascape-in-Brittany

Gauguin – Seascape in Brittany

In the article, there’s a reference  to William McGonagall The Tay Bridge Disaster

Blue-and-Silver--TrouvilleWhistler

Whistler – Blue and Silver Trouville

 

Van_Gogh_-_Fischerboote_bei_Saintes-Maries1

Van Gogh

Seascape at Saintes-Maries (Fishing Boats at Sea), 1888, Pushkin Museum, Moscow, Russia

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Darling Clementine

and other sunshine substitutes to warm up the winter…

I haven’t found that many Darling Clementines this winter…until this week!

clementines

The grocers shelves have been full of Halo Mandarins ( a New York Times story on Mandarin growing in California)

and of course, grapefruit

Grapefruit-Whole-&-Split

 

and mangoes – Van Gogh mangoes, no less

van Gogh mango

Van Gogh painted lots of fruit and veg, but no mangoes…although in the Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam there is a painting by Paul Gauguin of Mango Trees

Mango trees Gaugin VanGogh musuem

 

I bought some beets last week…..

Beets-Bundle.jpg

I once had a bunch of beets on the checkout counter. The cashier held them up and asked,”Bunch of radishes?” I shook my head, and he asked,”But they are a BUNCH???” Evidently ‘bunch’ is a category he could look things up by….we finally got to BEET.

With the bunch of beets you get the bonus greens, good by themselves, good for soup. I roasted the beets for salad, and ate them peeled, diced  with some blue cheese dressing. I was going to mix them with orange, but I just kept eating them (beet and orange) separately.

Lemons were in the markdown bin….

lemons

I’ll juice them and put the juice in an ice cube tray in the freezer. When frozen, I’ll pop them into a baggie (I get the freezer bags because they have a place to write what’s inside) and be able to have a little juice whenever…..

ice cube trays

I love the new ice cube trays! I don’t often use ice cubes, but I like to freeze bits of things to use them later.

I’ve had plenty of roasted pumpkin to keep me warm….I used some to make a pasta sauce. Or I could have used dome to top a pizza…..

roasted squash

.

I had some red and yellow peppers, and inspired by a recent New York Times story,as well as any excuse to use the oven because it’s SOOOOO cold outside,  I made a red and yellow pepper pizza…EXCEPT (you knew that this part was coming…..)

I didn’t have the sausage or the mozzarella cheese…..actually, I HAD the sausage, it was just in the freezer and a little hard to use at the time, so I left it out. Then I realized that I had no mozzarella or ricotta or cheddar… heavy dairy products were put on the shopping list, and I punted along with what I had.

I had some Parmesan.Actual cheese and not wood pulp.

.I froze half of the dough, because 4 pizzas are more then I can manage for myself.

I topped the piece I used with the peppers, and a little hot red pepper and olive oil and grated cheese.A little onion and garlic chopped very fine to mix it all up.  Peppers really need to be cooked a little ahead and/or cut very very small….So a B minus sort of pizza.

As I was washing up, I remembered that there was a little bacon in the fridge. THAT would have made the pizza into B plus/A minus grade.

I ended my meal with some dried apricots….

apricots Sunsweet

and some Jammin’ Lemon Ginger…..because this cold snap is going to break soon, right?:

Jammin Lemon Ginger

As for soups…..I want to cook beans and lentils and other sorts of pulses …with greens. I feel a soup week coming on.

 

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A Tale of Two Recipes

Recipe the First:

The Recipe not followed…….

‘It was the best of times, it was – not exactly the worst of times, but definitely a sub-prime, not all cylinders sparking, Dickens of time.

Travel back in time to earlier in January. This January.

Weather forecast says clear; next day it snows. Weather forecast says snow. Next day is sunny and warm. The weather is not going to be average, although the stats are going to ultimately read that. Even this week the temperature range is from -11 to +48. In One Week. Which will average out to average which is why: nothing is average and average is lie.

Also – when I shop, I go to the back of the Produce section and check out the markdown rack, and fill my cart out after that. In the last few years (decades) I’ve been able to score cauliflower galore for very very little money. Once upon a time there was a soup recipe that called for roasted cauliflower, before the world had discovered roasted veg….maybe Gourmet or Bon Apeptit. We were living on Pleasant Street. I had my discount cauliflower, broke it apart, tossed it with oil, a little S&P, popped it into a hot oven, let the heat do it’s magic. It came out to be added to the rest of the soup fixin’s but as it was cooling…..I re-wrote the recipe to start by roasting 2 cauliflower, one to snack on and one for the soup.

Cauliflower

And NOW since everyone is roasting veg ALL THE TIME AND there’s a drought in California, cauliflower is now puny and rather sad looking and as expensive as beef…..

I don’t eat as much cauliflower as I have been the last few years/decades.

Which brings me back to broccoli. Broccoli was the standard green veg on our table growing up. Green Beans had their place, but broccoli was the Jolly Green Giant of the supper tale. Boiled and served with lemon and butter. The lemon is what made the difference. We all ate it all the time.

Which meant it was sometimes leftover. Cold, with a little more lemon, great on a lunch salad. When my son was little, leftover broccoli was chopped and added to the next night’s mac and cheese, or sometimes the chopped broccoli and olive oil was the macaroni sauce.

So, when the January 13th, 2016 NYT had a Recipes for Health column headlined:

Broccoli’s Saucy Side

I said YES, I remember that, I used to do that!!!!. I could do it again!

Sidebar – This is the way I generally feel Martha Rose Shulman’s column, and I have several of her books and always get distracted when I dip in. I do so wish that the column weren’t called Recipes for Health which sounds like more heavy lifting and less fun then it is. Why not call it Recipes for a Life Well Lived?

Back- … so I got some nicer looking, more my price range broccoli.

Saucy Broccoli, here I come!

The first part of cooking from a recipe is reading the recipe from start to finish.

Then – gather your ingredients and batterie de cuisine

Do not, in other words, put the water on to cook the broccoli BEFORE you’ve read the recipe the whole way through.

And thus begins the ‘not followed’ portion of the program.

It called for broccoli and I had broccoli – so far, so good. Although I hadn’t weighed it and it was….markdown broccoli. Trimmed and ready to go.

 

It called for fusilli and I had pipettes. In the pasta world, they’re same family, similar enough form and therefore function.

 

fusili

fuselli

pipettes

pipettes

It called for garlic, I got out the garlic.

It called for anchovy fillets and I ….

I often have anchovy in the house, and if I did, where would they be? Or are anchovies one of those staples that I current don’t have? And why didn’t I look at this before I went to the store earlier?

BUT

WAIT

I was just this afternoon reading something something and it called for anchovies and it said, “To make this vegan, substitute chopped capers for the chopped anchovy”

YES. Capers, olives, vinegar and hot peppers are all part of my

Fridge Door Pantry Collection.

Open the Fridge – mustards, rooster sauce, leaf lard, fresh ginger, Parmesan cheese….what, no pickled condiments??????Not even giardiniera? Quel dommage!

giardianero jar

Not even an empty jar…..

Now the pot of water is boiling, so I throw the broccoli in. Two minutes to come up with a B plan…..

Open the fridge, open the freezer, open the ONE cupboard that had foodstuffs in it…….

Hot pepper flakes? Yes. Mise those in place.

Olive oil? Also yes, ready to go next to the hot pepper.

Garlic?

garlic

Garlic? Garlic? Bueller??? Where did I put the garlic?

Fine garlic, play hide and seek….wait, beside the olive oil is the fancy flavored olive oil ….Orange Olive Oil….with some raisins in the cupboard and hot pepper and some almonds…..that’s impromptu sorta Sicilian style. Works for me.

So – put the Orange Olive Oil in a pan, toss in the chopped broccoli, add the chopped almonds, toss in a handful of raisins, sprinkle with the hot pepper flakes towards the end. Save some of the pasta water before I drain the pipettes…..pulling a little pasta water is my new fun thing to do with macaroni. I really helps to keep it loose and doesn’t just water down the flavor. It’s a secret magic ingredient, especially if you can remember to do it before you pour it all down the drain.

Mix the macaroni with the hot veg, toss like crazy. Add a little of the pasta water if you need it. Top with grated Parmesan cheese.

And this is how I didn’t make Broccoli’s Saucy Side.

As for the garlic….it was in the other room with the car keys near the door…somethings are best not questioned too closely.

to be continued…..

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The Pies of Pi Day

Just coincidence, but Pi Day was also Opening Day at Plimoth Plantation.

I got to make pies, as part as a new program in the English Village :

Soule Food

George Soule came over in the Mayflower in 1620 and lived in Plymouth Colony until his death in 1679. Since Plymouth Colony came under Massachusetts Bay Colony rule (and then became known as ‘The Old Colony’) in 1692, the George Soule story is pretty much the Plymouth Colony Story.

So I picked  Parsnip Pies and  Apple Pies as pies that were seasonal in the 17th century and each had an important piece of the foodways story to tell.

Parsnips

Parsnips won't have much green this time of year, and the rind will definitely need peeling. They are said to be sweeter after a frost. But in the summer, you eat them smaller, so it rather evens all out.

Parsnips won’t have much green this time of year, and the rind will definitely need peeling. They are said to be sweeter after a frost. But in the summer, you eat them smaller, so it rather evens all out.

are one of the things you can plant in September and leave in the ground throughout the winter; they just keep growing, albeit slowly. They seed in their second year, so the won’t last through the warm weather – you’ll have to plant them again when the soil is warmer. You can enjoy them throughout the year.

To make a Tart of Parsneps & Scyrrets

Seeth yr roots in water and wine, pill them & beat them in a morter, with raw eggs & grated bread. bedew them often with rose water & wine, then streyne them & put sugar to them & some juice of leamons, & put it in ye crust; & when yr tart is baked, cut it up & butter it hot, or you may put some butter into it, when you set it into ye oven, & eat it cold. ye Juice of leamon you may eyther put in or leave out at yr pleasure.

Martha Washington’s Book of Cookery p.97

Skirrets

are another root, long out of fashion, that seem poised for a comeback.

This is me, holding skirrets for the New York Times in 2007.

This is me, out standing in my field, holding skirrets for the New York Times in 2011.

A Skirrette Pye

Take the large skirrets, scale them and peele them and season them with Cinnamon and sugar, take good store of marrow and season it with salt and nutmeg then Lay your marrow in the bottom of your pye the your skirrets with some Citron and Ringo Roots when it comes out of the oven putt with sack or white wine caudle.

EPSON scanner image

Almost forgotten at the back of a drawer for generations, Hannah Alexander’s Book of Cookery—which was first penned in Dublin in the late seventeenth century—has finally made it into print. First edition, 2014. Edited by Deirdre Nuttal. With an Introduction by Jennifer Nuttall née Alexander.

For more on skirrets

And then there were apples…..

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Kitchen Garden

This is the time of year that my thoughts turn to

GARDENS

There’s nothing like the days growing shorter to make me want to be out in the sun. Or at least in a sunny window. And so it is in November that I really want to garden. Maybe I’m just living in the wrong hemisphere, or maybe it’s just my contrary nature, or maybe I just need some dirt not covered by snow and ice.

This year, I will really and truly try to garden indoors. Again.

But I don’t have the best track record.

  1. I tend to feel sorry for the poor pitiful specimens in the grocery store, most of which were a deep breath from dust before they got off the truck, and so I bring them home….at least with herbs they can be used dried…..and thus I continue my long tradition of The Dead Plant Society collection.
  2. OR I forget that since I live in a well shaded yard, and that even when the leaves drop from the trees, it’s still dark by photosynthesis standards.
  3. OR that the brightest windows are often the draftiest windows and plants don’t like to grow in Arctic breezes, it’s not just the snow that gets them down.
  4. OR that the first killing frost or the first snow are past the point to dig something up from outside and bring it in. And definitely the too-late mark for looking for a shovel or a pot or a bag of potting soil….
  5. OR I try to start seeds without supplemental grow lights and the shortest days of the year are not long enough for any good germination.
  6. AND I forget that artificial heat, even at the low levels I keep it at, dry out the pots Zip-a-Dee-Doo-Dah quick
  7. And then Michael Tortorello has a great story on Kitchen Gardens  in the New York Times. I am inspired all over again. I have sorrel and thyme already in, and I have vowed not to buy anything in the grocery store, but rather wait for the Plymouth Farmers Market and buy only actual plants and not dried herbs that still have soil attached…And I have not 1, but 2 pieces of ginger root that have sprouted…Shades of The After-Dinner Gardening Book!After Dinner Gardening Book

    Ginger rooting - root, root root for ginger!

    Ginger rooting – root, root root for ginger!

 

 

Have a wonderful day!

 

 

 

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Craft Corn

I admit, when I saw the headline in the Dining Section of last Wednesday’s New York Times, I thought it was about playing with your food….christmas-crafts-garland_612

but not quite. Sometimes, you have to read the whole headline.

The actual headline: The Rise of Craft Popcorn. And it’s a very interesting story, about small farmers bringing back specialty popcorns, which now must be craft, no doubt because the term artisan has been so overused as to be meaningless.

For one thing, I learned that popcorn

Popcorn kernels

Popcorn kernels -Zea mays everta

is more closely related to flint corn then I thought before…

flint corn

Flint corn or Zea mays indurata – popcorn may actually be a variety of flint corn

 

Which is just in time for Pilgrim and popcorn stories. And Thanksgiving and Turkey stories.

They’re just not true – whether or not flint corn can beget popcorn or not – because no one in the 17th (or 18th) century mentions them. Most of them began in the 19th century which is 200 years too late to be timely, but they’re interesting.

John Howland pondering popcorn at the first Thanksgiving - from a scene from a 19th century novel

John Howland pondering popcorn at the first Thanksgiving – from a scene from a 19th century novel Standish of Standish

Jane Goodwin Austin’s Standish of Standish has this scenes – in 1889.

Jane Goodwin Austin, not to be confused with Jane Austen, the Pride and Prejudice author. Please.

Jane Goodwin Austin, not to be confused with Jane Austen, the Pride and Prejudice author. Please.

Turkey, popcorn and Thanksgiving. They way it never happened.

PaperBagTurkey3

Paperbag turkey with popcorn

directions to paperbag turkey here

The Turkey Shot Out of the Oven 

by Jack Prelutsky

The turkey shot out of the oven

and rocketed into the air,

it knocked every plate off the table

and partly demolished a chair.

It ricocheted into a corner

and burst with a deafening boom,

then splattered all over the kitchen,

completely obscuring the room.

It stuck to the walls and the windows,

it totally coated the floor,

there was turkey attached to the ceiling,

where there’d never been turkey before.

It blanketed every appliance,

it smeared every saucer and bowl,

there wasn’t a way i could stop it,

that turkey was out of control.

I scraped and I scrubbed with displeasure,

and though with chagrin as I mopped,

that I’d never again stuff a turkey

with popcorn that hadn’t been popped.

 

Something BIG Has Been Here written by Jack Prelutsky and illus. by James Stevenson, 1990.

You can’t pop popcorn inside a turkey. Use a covered pan for the best results.

and that doesn’t even begin to cover johnnycakes…..

Johnnycakes from the Kenyon Mills Facebook page - they way they like 'em in Rhode Island

Johnnycakes from the Kenyon Mills Facebook page – they way they like ’em in Rhode Island

and then there’s Indian Pudding, and Brown Bread and sampe and corn bread and …….it’s all grist for the mill…2014_SampeFest_Flyer

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I’m strong to the FINNISH Cause I eats my Spinnage

I’m Sarah the  Pilgrim Woman! Ta-da!

Hey, if it rhymes for Popeye it can rhyme for me! (Popeye rhymes ‘finnach’ with ‘spinach’ – same deal, different dialect) popeye w spinach

And by the Finnish….I mean actual people from Finland.

These guys…

American Food Battle

Henri Alen and Nicolas Thielon from American Food Battle

Nicolas loved his pilgrim clothes….he thought he looked like a Musketeer, as in Three. And, The Three Musketeers did take place in 1627. In France and not New England, but still,

Nicolas could jump right in with the 1974 Three Musketeers crowd

Nicolas could jump right in with the 1974 Three Musketeers crowd, right in between Michael York and Richard Chamberlain

And, spinnage or spinach, was one of the dishes I prepared. It looked like this:

Spinach with eggs; German School, 17th century. Notice also r0asted quails

Spinach with eggs; German School, 17th century. Notice also r0asted quails

Divers Sallets boyled.
Parboile Spinage, and chop it fine, with the edges of two hard Trenchers upon a boord, or the backs of two Choppin-knives; then set upon a Chafingdish of Coales with Butter and vinegar. Season it with Sugar and a few parboyld Currans. Then cut hard Egges into quarters to garnish it withal, and serve it upon Sippets. So you may serve Burrage, Buglosse, Endiffe, Suckory, Coleflowers, Sorrell, Marigold-leaves,Wintercresses, Leekes boyled Onions, Sporragus, Rocket, Alexanders. Perboyle them and season them all alike: whether it be with Oyle and Vinenegar, or Butter and Vinegar, Sinamon, Ginger, Sugar, and Butter: Egges are necessary, or at least very good for all boyld Sallets.”
-1615. John Murrell. A Newe Booke of Cookerie. Falconwood ed. p. 15.

Quick run through for this Wicked Wayback Wednesday

  • Spinage is, natch, spinach
  • These trenchers are a kind of a knife, as are the Choppin knives – when I first saw this I thought they were Chopin Knives , and I was pretty sure that Chopin wasn’t around in 1615…
    Frederick Chopin, 1835 at age 25

    Frederic Chopin, 1835 at age 25 – nope, he wasn’t around in the 17th century

    Anyhow, chop spinach. Because of what happens next, even better, start with frozen chopped spinach and save yourself the trouble. When it’s cooked, drain the spinach. In fact, put it on an old clean towel and wring it out over a sink. Seriously. Squeeze that moisture out. I added 1/2 pound fresh sorrel to the almost 2 pounds of spinach as it was almost cooked down.  Sorrel doesn’t need much cooking and it really perks up spinach. The New York Times has this story on sorrel in the spring. (click on the link ) I’m going to try keeping some indoors this winter…..more on that later…. and I’ve never had trouble keeping sorrel all summer and into the Fall. Keep using it!

    Sorrel - Rumex acetosa. Oseille in French; suolaheinä in Finnish; acetosa in Italian

    Sorrel – Rumex acetosa. Oseille in French; suolaheinä in Finnish; acetosa in Italian

  • Put some butter in a heavy pan. By some, I mean a lot…Add the drained, wrung  out chopped spinach/sorrel mass. Put more butter on top. Over low heat, let the green stew up in butter and what’s left of its own juices.
  • Add currants – not the fresh ones, the dried ones. Parboil them first (just put boiling water over them for a few minutes – dried fruit is not as dried as it used to be. And that’s a change in the last 30 years, not the last 400). Raisins are really too big – currants are much nicer in this.

    Raisins V. Currants . Sometimes, Size matters.

    Raisins V. Currants . Sometimes, size DOES matter.

  • Add a splash of vinegar. How much depends on how much and how lip puckering your sorrel is, if you’ve added any. Add a little more butter on top, put the lid on the pan and keep it on low heat, stirring it about every now and again so nothing sticks to the bottom and all the spinach soaks up all the butter. Add more butter if it seems dry. Don’t be afraid of butter!
  • Hard boil some eggs. You’ve got time. Keep the green a-stewing.
  • What? No spinach? No worries – use borage, bugloss, endive, chicory,cauliflower, sorrel, calendula leaves , cresses, leeks, onions, asparagus (let me note here that in my opinion it is a crime against Nature to puree asparagus) rocket or arugala, and alexanders . This recipe is a master recipe – a whole class of salad, for all seasons of the year, covered.
    Alexanders (Smyrnium olusatrum) are a kind of wild celery, still found in the English countryside

    Alexanders (Smyrnium olusatrum) are a kind of wild celery, still found in the English countryside

     

  • Taste and season with cinnamon, ginger, sugar, vinegar and butter – all to your taste. Make it taste good. Your opinion counts!
  • Pile up on a serving platter and garnish with those hard boiled eggs, quartered. Serve hot, or warm, or at room temperature. What the painting doesn’t show is sippets – slices  of bread toasted or fried in butter. You knew there’d be more butter, right?

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Red Potato Salad

More of a pinkish mauveish reddish….pnkyredthat’s what happens when you mix red beet root ….

with just about anything.

In the Victory Garden Cookbook it’s called Russian Beet and Potato Salad. Not red potatoes, not this time.
I thought I could play up Spud/ Sputnik angle by calling it Spudnik, but then I thought it might go unnoticed…..or worse, you’d think that I could NOT spell, and  didn’t even know how to use Spellcheck.
Sheryl Julian who was with the Phoenix back in the day, now with the Globe – I have a whole lot of her Sunday Globe columns in my clippings file. Here’s a story with her Apron obsession, which doesn’t sound so obsessive to me…..

The New York Times also had an Apron photo essay/story recently….

But the season is good for beets and potatoes, and this salad is almost a stand alone meal, if you add a hard boiled egg – a cold one for a hot day and a hot one for a cool night. For now is that part of September that is still Summer, but encroaching Autumn.

Autumn Leaves - John Everett Millias 1856

Autumn Leaves – John Everett Millias 1856

Red Beet and Potato Salad

2 medium potatoes

¼ c chopped parsley

1/3 c chopped scallions (or chives or Vidalia’s)

1 cucumber

1 dill or half sour pickle (or 2, 2 pickles)

Salt and pepper

4-5 medium beets

Mayonnaise

Horseradish mustard

  1. Cook potatoes until just tender, peel as soon as they can be handled and cut them into ½ inch pieces.
  2. Peel cucumber, cut in half and remove seeds with a spoon. Cut into ½ pieces.
  3. Cut pickle in to ½ dice and add with spuds and cukes.
  4. Add parsley and scallions and mix gently.
  5. Cook beets, slip off their skins and cut to ½ pieces.
  6. Just before serving add beets and season to taste.
  7. Dress the whole thing with a mixture of mayo and horseradish mustard.
  8. The longer the beets sit with everything the more magenta the whole thing gets. Sprinkle with vinegar of it’s too flat. Salt and pepper everything, too.

Victory Garden Cookbook p. 25.

Victory Garden Cookbook - Marian Morash

Victory Garden Cookbook – Marian Morash

Fractals, chlorophyll and solstice - what's not to love about September?

Fractals, chlorophyll and solstice – what’s not to love about September?

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