Tag Archives: menu

Fourth of July Menu, Early 20th Century

The 45 star flag of 1901.(banner)

WhiteHouseCookBook001

The White House Cook Book was first released in 1894, and was updated regularly.

TO THE

WIVES OF OUR PRESIDENTS,

THOSE NOBLE WOMEN WHO HAVE GRACED THE

WHITE HOUSE

DEAR TO ALL AMERICANS,

THIS VOLUME

IS AFFECTIONATELY DEDICATED

BY THE AUTHOR.

In between the recipes and household hints there are portraits of the first ladies…..all of them up to 1900 in this 1901 edition.

There are also menus for the whole  year, of breakfast, dinner, and supper suggestions for each day of a week for each month of the year, as well as special whole day holiday menus.

New Year’s Day has a menu, as does Washington’s Birthday (which includes Washington Pie for dinner, but also English Pound Cake for supper…)

July begins with a

TR flag 1901

FOURTH OF JULY.

BREAKFAST.

Red Raspberries and Cream

Fried Chicken 86.   Scrambled Tomatoes 196.

Warmed Potatoes 186.     Tennessee Muffins 245.

Toast 268.

Coffee 487.

DINNER.

Clam Soup 46.

Boiled Cod 68., with Lobster Sauce 150.

Roast Lamb 136. With Mint Sauce 152.

New Potatoes Boiled 183.

Green Peas 201.    Spinach with Eggs 202.

Cucumbers Sliced 167

Chicken Patties 85

Naple Biscuits 343.  Vanilla Ice-cream 357.

Chocolate Macaroons 358.   Strawberries.

Coffee 437.

 

SUPPER.

Cold Sliced Lamb 134.

Crab Pie 69. Water-cress Salad 168. Cheese Toast 264.

Graham Bread 234.  Sponge Cake 277.

Blackberries. Tea 439.

 

p. 468 White House CB

I was interested to see Green Peas and New Potatoes for the Fourth, as well as Boiled Cod with Lobster Sauce, even though it’s not quite Poached Salmon and Egg Sauce…..

But wait –

are those

MACAROONS

for dessert at dinner?????

Macaroons again? You spend some time with a recipes, and it turns up EVERYWHERE

Although this time in chocolate….

Chocolate Macaroons

PUT three ounces of plain chocolate in a pan and melt on a slow fire; then work it to a thick paste with one pound of powdered sugar and the whites of three eggs; roll the mixture down to the thickness of about one-quarter of an inch; cut it in small, round pieces with a paste-cutter, either plain or scalloped; butter a pan slightly, and dust it with flour and sugar in equal quantities; place in it the pieces of paste or mixture, and bake in a hot but not too quick oven.

  1. Ziemann, Hugo and Mrs. F. L. Gillette. The White House Cook Book. The Saalfield Publishing Co.: New York-Akron-Chicago. p. 353.

45starflag

Can you name the five states that joined the Union in the 20th century?

Talk amongst yourselves…..

Happy Fourth!

 

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Filed under Holiday, New England, Recipe, Summer, Wicked Wayback

Best Meal EVAH

October 19, 1986

According to my notes, this was the first time I cooked a meal for my family that everyone liked. Everything. It’s not that they’re fussy or weren’t eating what was put before them, but I’m not the only one with opinions, and there were always a half a dozen suggestions of what to try ‘next time’.

Until this time.

Historic.

I copied the menu into my notebook, one that I’ve kept.

The menu was:

Perfect Pot Roast

Horseradish cream sauce

Mashed potatoes

Parmesan drop biscuits

Green Salad

Galette

The Perfect Pot Roast was from the McCalls Cooking School.

Mcalls CS bindersWhen you joined they sent you the binder and every few weeks more recipes. It was a great way to see lots of new recipes, pick out a few to try, a few for someday and they were already organized so you (me) could find them again.

Except that I would take them out of the binders to cook them and maybe put them away someplace else…but Perfect Pot Roast was one I copied into my little notebook, so I still have it, at least a version of it.

This is the picture side

This is the picture side

 

Perfect Pot Roast

5 lbs beef rump roast

2 Tbls oil

2 Tbls butter

1 onion, sliced

2 cloves garlic, crushed

1 tsp dried thyme

1 tsp dried oregano

1 bay leaf, crumbled

12 pepper corns

1 can beer (I would be inclined to use a better beer then I probably did then)

2 Tbls beef bouillon crystals (I don’t use this anymore – a little salt and a little more garlic is what I’d do know)

1 Lb carrots

1 lb small onions

3 Tbls flour

  1. Brown meat in oil, butter and sliced onion, browning on all sides – about 20-25 minutes
  2. To dripping add garlic, thyme, oregano, bay leaf and peppercorns – stir 30 seconds, add beer (bouillon). Bring to a boil, simmer, covered 2½ hours.
  3. Add carrots (peeled and quartered) and onions (peeled) simmer covered another 30 minutes or until tender.
  4. Remove veggies and remove meat.
  5. Strain liquid and put back in the pot.
  6. Add 3 Tbls to ¼ cup of cold water (put it into a jar with a lid and give it a good shake) Add this slurry to the drippings.
  7. Bring to a boil, reduce heat and simmer 3 minutes till silky.

Serves 10.

McCall’s Cooking School , Meat #20.

This is what the flip sid eof the binder cards looked like - step by step illustrated instruction - easy peasy

This is what the flip side of the binder cards looked like – step by step illustrated instruction – easy peasy – although I suspect this is another McCalls series and not the Cooking School.

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Filed under Perception ways, Recipe, The 1980's

Month of May

Robert May, that is.

RobertMayTheAccomplishtCookFrontispieceI somehow thought that I could write about food and not write about the 17th century….not true. The 17th century kitchen spends too much time in my brain for me to ignore.

Since I spend many of my waking hours in 1627…..dressed in a burlap suit doing menial labor, as it were, and get paid to play with fire….Wednesdays will have a Wicked-WayBack feature. Take that Throwback Thursdays!

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Robert May’s bill of fare for the month of May:

A Bill of Fare for May.

1 Scotch Pottage or Skink.
2 Scotch collops of mutton
3 A Loin of Veal.
4 An oline, or a Pallat pye.
5 Three Capons, 1 larded.
6 Custards.

A Second Course.

1 Lamb.
2 A Tart Royal, or Quince Pye
3 A Gammon of Bacon Pie.
4 A Jole of Sturgeon.
5 Artichock Pie hot.
6 Bolonia Sausage.
Tansies.

To make a Tansie the best way.

Take twenty eggs, and take away five whites, strain them with a
quart of good thick sweet cream, and put to it grated nutmeg, a race
of ginger grated, as much cinamon beaten fine, and a penny white
loaf grated also, mix them all together with a little salt, then
stamp some green wheat with some tansie herbs, strain it into the
cream and eggs, and stir all together; then take a clean frying-pan,
and a quarter of a pound of butter, melt it, and put in the tansie,
and stir it continually over the fire with a slice, ladle, or
saucer, chop it, and break it as it thickens, and being well
incorporated put it out of the pan into a dish, and chop it very
fine; then make the frying pan very clean, and put in some more
butter, melt it, and fry it whole or in spoonfuls; being finely
fried on both sides, dish it up, and sprinkle it with rose-vinegar,
grape-verjuyce, elder-vinegar, couslip-vinegar, or the juyce of
three or four oranges, and strew on good store of fine sugar.

Otherways.

Take a little tansie, featherfew, parsley, and violets stamp and
strain them with eight or ten eggs and salt, fry them in sweet
butter, and serve them on a plate and dish with some sugar.

Tansy the best way is a whole lotta tansy…..but otherways, take 8 eggs, beat them;  a handful of parsley and put it in an old dishtowel and squeeze the juice out of it and add it to the eggs. Add some salt. Fry it up in butter. Slide it out onto a dish and flip it back in to cook both sides.

Sprinkle a little sugar on top and serve,either hot or at room temp.

17th century cooking ion a 21st century kitchen.

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Filed under Books, Influencers, The 17th century