Tag Archives: greens

Salad Daze

It’s August.

Too hot even for toast.

Salad.

Easy salad.

Take a bunch of fresh things, of the leafy/ veggie/ fruit sort.

Spinach_leaves

Wash.

Pick. Peel. Seeding optional.

Add a Protein:

  • hard boiled egg
  • cheese
  • bacon
  • sliced meat
  • nuts

Greens – pick, wash, chop or otherwise make small enough to fit on a fork and into your mouth. WHY are so many salads with leaves bigger then the bowl?

Fresh herbs – easy flavor add.

Dress. From a bottle or olive oil and vinegar, salt and pepper . A little mustard makes it nice.

Maybe a carb layer – croutons/a little cold macaronis/leftover rice.

Meal in a bowl.

SdeWarburgSalad

The moshav (agricultural village) of Sde Warburg, Israel, holds the Guinness World Record for the largest lettuce salad, weighing 10,260 kg (11.3 short tons). The event, held on 10 November 2007.

There is a song or two titled Salad Days….

BUT

This is way cool

 

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Filed under Eating, Recipe, Summer

Grapenuts Pudding

 

While brewing a little beer at work recently…..

All in the name of research and history….

We had some malted barley and malted wheat brewing and we all noticed how much it smelled like Grape-Nuts.

The healthy, crunchy, good for you cereal.

grapenuts current

And I started to think, ponder, dwell, fantasize, dream  about

GRAPENUTS PUDDING

Not the Puff Pudding, just plain old Grape-nuts custard……

But first to find the Grape-nuts….

Kathy went to the store first and found Grape-nuts Flakes….do they even make grape-nuts any more?????

Another store, with some poking and searching  – Grape-nuts! And a store brand that had much more sugar and salt…..

So the Grape-nuts come home, but the pudding recipe is no longer on the box.

The internet offered several solutions:

grapenut pudding rx

The thin layer of grape-nuts at the bottom is not the layer I’m looking for….keep looking

grape-nut-pudding-Parade mag

This is from Parade Magazine – thicker layer at the bottom, and thinner, crispier layer at top. I hope.

  • INGREDIENTS:

  • 6 large eggs

  • ¾ cup sugar

  • 1 tsp freshly grated nutmeg

  • ½ tsp cinnamon

  • 1 tsp vanilla

  • 4 cups whole milk

  • Grape-Nuts cereal

  • whipped cream

 

  1. Butter a 2-quart baking dish and preheat oven to 400°F.
  2. Whisk eggs, sugar, nutmeg, cinnamon, and vanilla in a large bowl. Whisk in milk.
  3. Pour a thin layer of Grape-Nuts cereal into baking dish, barely covering bottom of dish. Pour in milk mixture.
  4. Bake 30 to 40 minutes, until mostly set but jiggly in center. Serve with whipped cream.

By Sarah DiGregorio  May 10, 2014

https://communitytable.parade.com/288844/sarahdigregorio/grape-nuts-pudding/

 

Still not the thick layer at the bottom I remember, the layer of soggy grape-nuts….

Savour has a version that promises the bottom layer….

December 19, 2007 Saveur

serves 6-8

Ingredients

1 cup Grape-Nuts cereal

1 qt. milk

4 eggs

12 cup sugar

1 tbsp. vanilla extract

14 tsp. fine salt

Grated nutmeg

Instructions

Heat oven to 350°. Grease a 2-quart glass loaf pan with 1 tsp. butter; set aside. Put cereal into a bowl; set aside.

Bring milk just to a boil over medium heat; pour over cereal and set aside to let soak for 5 minutes.

Beat together eggs, sugar, vanilla, and salt in a large bowl. Slowly pour egg mixture into milk mixture while whisking constantly. Transfer to reserved pan; set in a deep roasting pan. Pour enough hot water into roasting pan that it reaches halfway up pudding pan. Bake until just set, about 1 14 hours. Let cool; sprinkle with grated nutmeg.

http://www.saveur.com/article/Recipes/Grape-Nuts-Pudding

 

But now that Spring has finally come, and the weather is in the 70’s, the last thing I want to do is turn on the oven and fuss with a  water bath  – even calling it bain marie doesn’t make it more attractive.

Pea shoots, micro-green salads, pasta with seasonal pestos, eggs with greeny things….It’s still April; there’ll be a day for custard before May.

 

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Filed under New England, Pantry, Recipe, The 1960"s, Wicked Wayback

Collard Greens

Kale, Kale, Kale

Kale Pesto.

Kale Chips.

Guac-KALE-mole (and no outcry in the New York Times? Puh-leeze!)

Kale this and Kale that yadda yadda do da.

Kale-Bundle

You’d think it was the only leafy green in the world.

I’m not a kale hater, but it’s NOT the only green in the Garden.

Last week, my head was turned by….

Collard Greens.

collards

Back in the day, the English called these pretty babies Coleworts. ‘Collards’ is a dialectal variation of the word, the variation that stuck.

Great, big, beautiful, cut that very morning collards. A foot long in leaf and nearly as wide.

collardgreens

Hello, beautiful.

Collards are the the Jan Brady of the Greens World.

jan_brady_000067

“Marcia Marcia Marcia” – just like collards say “Kale Kale Kale”

They do not make the back cover of Cook’s Illustrated. Their Spokes-model is Huck Finn. They are not artisanal. No one seems to be making Guac-Collard-mole, thank you, thank you very much.

Any how,

at the Plymouth Farmer’s Market  I saw a bunch of collards greens, among many bunches of collards

……my eye was caught.

My thoughts were spinning .

Like “Where the heck is my Victory Garden Cookbook? Collards and Rice would be very nice.”

Collards and Rice, easy-peasy to make. Collards, rice and chicken broth.

AND I had just made broth by tossing a rotisserie chicken carcass into the slow cooker with assorted bits and bobs of veggies too few or too far gone to otherwise be on the table, which then got to give up their goodness before they gave up the ghost.

Collards and Rice is really simple. Heat broth, add rice, add chopped collards and cook until done.

But I also don’t have my own pots and pans and bowls right now, so I need some measurements and proportions to work with. A little Google time online, and sure enough, someone else had adapted this same recipe, so this is my adaptation of another adaptation:(Collards and Rice: A Magical Combination  November 8, 2010 by http://www.sunsetparkcsa.org/?p=94)

Collards and Rice
Adapted from The Victory Garden Cookbook

Serves 6-8

4 cups chicken broth  (you can use water, or only part broth or add a piece of bacon or 2 or add a little butter)
2 cups long-grained white rice
6 cups loosely packed cups cleaned and chiffonade  raw collard leaves – cut out the ribs roll and slice. If the leaves are really big, randomly hack away. they shrink in the cooking. I put the cut bits in a big bowl and measured them out by the handfuls…6ish handfuls = 6 cups in my world today.

Chiffonade1

Freshly ground pepper

Boil broth; add rice. Bring back to a boil. Stir and add the collards, handful by handful, stirring constantly. Cover, bring to a boil, reduce heat, and cook until the rice is done, approximately 20 minutes.

sriracha_the_worlds_coolest_hot_sauce_0

Rooster Sauce

Season to taste. (this is where the pepper comes in. Or Tabasco or other hot pepper sauce .I’m loving Rooster sauce right now)

I love this book - Marian Morash is wonderful!

I love this book – Marian Morash is wonderful!

 

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Filed under Influencers, Recipe, Summer

Summertime Kitchen Sink Salads

One notably hot summer – as if we have other then notably hot summers – our suppers consisted of Salads, Sandwiches and Smoothies. It was a “there’s already enough heat in the kitchen, who has any appetite to anything big in this heat anyhow?” summer.

But I never made a salad in a jar. Nor am I about to now. Salad dressing in jar, yes. Salad outside the jar.

Now, IF (when) I’m in the checkout line for far toooooo long, the magazines that line the counter seem more and more interesting. This can lead to some buyer’s remorse. And so the other day I ended up with….a magazine I looked at the next day and said, “I spent CASH MONEY on this hooey?”.

Being summer there was a story on salads, but not any salads:

MEALS IN MASON JARS

This is a Strawberry Pecan Salad

This is a Strawberry Pecan Salad. In a Mason Jar. and although I haven’t mentioned the name of the periodical, they’ve included a photo credit, bless their heart.

You may remember where I stand on the Mason Jar as food service ware. Shark jumped.

fonzie jumps the shark ill

So, what exactly IS a Mason Jar?

The Mason jar was invented and patented in 1858 by Philadelphia tinsmith John Landis Mason[1][2] (1832-1902). Among other common names for them are Ball jars,[3] after Ball Corporation, an early and prolific manufacturer of the jars; fruit jars for a common content; and simply glass canning jars reflecting their material. Wiki

And now for a salad to eat out of a bowl or a plate…..the Summertime Salad.

Take greens, wash them well, add fruit, veggies, nuts, herbs, maybe some cooked beans or hard boiled eggs or even some cheese, leftover cooked macaroni, stale bread bits…. literally everything BUT the kitchen sink  – top with a dressing.

You can get these things from your garden or the Farmer’s Market or even the regular ole grocery store. This can be your lunch, your dinner or your supper. It can expand to serve from one person feeling peckish in the heat to a good sized hungry crowd. This isn’t as much as a recipe as permission to eat the things you like in whatever combination you think would be tasty. The dressing brings it all together.

 

  Goddess Dressing, Neo-Green:

½ total cup rough chopped fresh dill, basil and/ or parsley (or whatever combo you’d like or happen to have on hand – add up to another 1/4 cup if you like it greener)

3 cloves of garlic, peeled

1 Tablespoon grainy mustard

½ cup plain yoghurt

½ cup olive oil

2 teaspoons fresh lemon juice (1/2 a large lemon)

Salt and fresh cracked pepper to taste

  1. In a blender (or food processor) combine the herbs, garlic, mustard, and yoghurt and process until well blended.
  2. With the machine still running, add the olive oil in a steady stream.
  3. Add lemon juice and pulse to combine. Season with salt and pepper .
  4. Put on the salad…you already figured that part out, right?

Adapted from Chris Schlesinger and John Willoughby. Lettuce in Your Kitchen. William Morrow and Co, NY. 1996. pp. 138-9.

Lettuce in your kitchen

I may have initially gotten this book just for the great title. It’s a really great salad primer, as it turns out.

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Filed under Books, Eating, Recipe

It’s not easy being green….

when you’re a vegetable trying to grow in New England in February.

There are peas – dried peas left from the harvest back in August…and pease will be the queen of the day at Plymouth Farmers Market this  Thursday at the Taste of Plimoth table, where I’ll be demonstrating pease pottage and a pea tendril salad, 17th century recipes for a 21st century kitchen.  Easy-Peasey. It just 0ccured to me that Taste of Plimoth is ultimate Throwback Thursday.green peaseBut something growing? Something fresh? No such luck. Not without a greenhouse. Or a hoop-house. Or a really sunny windowsill.

As the day get longer, minute by minute, craving something a little green is the real harbinger as Spring. I can only be soooo conflicted about eating lettuces from California or Florida..sometimes I just need the green.

Salad…..salad means spring is a-coming.

Salad with almonds and orange perfume

¼ cup olive oil (a nice fruity one)

2 Tbl wine vinegar (she suggests sherry – check your pantry for something nice)

Pinch of ground cumin (I like a generous pinch – let your nose lead you)

Salt and pepper

1 garlic clove, peeled and crushed

1 small onion (she says medium) cut into very thin slices and soaked in water to take some of the hurt away

Zest of 1 orange (this is the secret ingredient that makes it perfume)

**

2 Tbl flat leafed parsley, chopped

4 handfuls of bite sized greens or 4 of whatever size is your serving size

12 roasted almonds, coarsely chopped

almond blossoms and fruit - this just doesn't grow around here

almond blossoms and fruit – this just doesn’t grow around here

  1. Mix the oil, vinegar, cumin, salt, pepper, garlic, onion (drain it if you’ve soaked it – if you like raw onion or it’s mild, like a Vidalia you might not need this. I always need it – cooked onions are better to me then raw ones ever prove to be) and orange zest together in in a small jar and shake to mix.
  2. Mix the parsley and the greens together.
  3. Add dressing and toss.
  4. Top with almonds.
  5. Serves 4, unless it’s the main course of supper, then 2.
  6. In trying to make this work as a single serving, there is the problem  of getting stuck with 1/2 of an onion and 1/2 the zest of an orange ( or would that be zest of one orange?), so I make a dressing in a jar and use it as I need it, usually over 2 meals.  I usually eat the orange (maybe with a little drip of honey) after the salad for supper the first night, and the rest for lunch the next day. Unless I eat the orange right away with a few almonds as the starter to supper. One hot hard-boiled egg and a slice of bread rounds out the meal.
  7. Enjoy!

Viana La Place. Unplugged Kitchen. William Morrow and Company. 1996. p. 118.

oranges

A little ray of winter sunshine

 

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Filed under Eating, Recipe