Tag Archives: food poetry

Hokey Poky Ice Cream Cone

Ice_cream_cone_waffle

August Ice-Cream Cone Poem

Lick

quick.

Paul B. Janeczko

 Food Fight, edited and illustrated. by Michael J. Rosen. Harcourt Brace & Co, 1996. p. 37.

food fight

In looking for images of ice cream cones, I found a reference to…..

The Hokey Poky

Now, I’m probably not the only one who wants to know what is the connection between  ice cream, cone and  Hokey Poky.

Honestly,  What’s it’s all about?????

hokey poky what if 650

In New Zealand there’s an ice cream called Hokey Poky.

It vanilla ice cream wit h

Hokey Poky ice cream is vanilla ice cream with pieces of honeycomb toffee.

But that’s not all…..

Hokey Poky was also slang in the late 19th and early 20th centuries for ice cream vendors – it would seem especially Italian Ice cream vendors. Hmm, My people.

Before there were cones, there were penny licks. A penny lick is the dish the ice cream was sold in. You licked the ice cream and gave the bowl back. The bowl was washed/rinsed and used again…I would just like to add “grimace icky yuck’ here. Hence the invention of the CONE. And not a moment too soon.

Penny Lick Glasses

Penny Lick Glasses

The first ice cream cone was produced in New York City in 1896 by Italo Marchiony, an Italian immigrant who was granted a patent in December 1903 for “small pastry cups with sloping sides.” The bottoms were flat, not conical. Ice cream and more Italians…There are other cone invention stories. But this is the earliest patent.

The earliest patent for a cone was somewhat like this....but of, course, there's MORE

The earliest patent for a cone was somewhat like this….but of, course, there’s MORE

Of course, although it’s totally unfounded, the very invention of ice cream has been attributed to another Italian – Catherina de Medici…which is nonsense, but the idea that the French had no good food until an Italian girl brought it over to them ….fantasy fiction is not such a recent invention after all.

Catherine deMedici

Catherina de Medici

HokeyBTNBeachIceCreamVendor

Notice the HOKEY on the cart. This is in England on Brighton Beach

It would seem that the Hokey Poky dance may have been invented independently of ice cream and Italian vendors.hokey poky keep calmHokey poky danceOne more ice cream image….

Walls and Ice Cream are also connected - long lost family????

Walls and Ice Cream are also connected – long lost family????

 

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More Pudding ( a wicked way back one….)

and a Pudding Contest.
Here are the rules for the 2014 Pudding Hollow Pudding Contest:

This is the pudding mold/crown for the winner of the contest – knowing Tinky, there will be other wonderful prizes as well

1. Contestants must be able to come to Hawley, Massachusetts, on September 28 by 11 am. If you are unable to attend the actual contest, you may send your pudding with a representative. You will be eligible for some prizes but not for the first-place award. Contestants must bring enough pudding to serve at least eight people and must march in the PUDDING PARADE. (If finalists are coming from far away, they may arrange to reheat their puddings in local kitchens.)

2. All recipes must be from original sources. That is, the formula for your own squash pudding or your Aunt Myrtle’s rice pudding is eligible. A recipe from a book is not.

3. Ingredients must be listed in the order used in the recipe. All ingredients listed must be used in the recipe instructions.

4. No pudding that has reached the finals in a previous year may be reentered.

5. Recipes will not be returned. The Sons & Daughters of Hawley and the Merry Lion Press reserve the right to reprint all recipes. No pudding will be accepted in the contest without a recipe.

 

and now for a pudding from the past, in verse no less….

Receipt for a Pudding

 If the vicar you treat,
You must give him to eat,
A pudding to hit his affection;
And to make his repast,
By the canon of taste,
Be the present receipt your direction.

First take two pounds of Bread,
Be the crumb only weigh’d,
For the crust the good house-wife refuses;
The proportion you’ll guess,
May be made more or less,
To the size that each family chuses.

Then its sweetness to make
Some currants you take
And Sugar of each half a pound
Be not butter forgot
And the quantity sought
Must the same with your currants be found

Cloves & mace you will want,
With rose water I grant,
And more savory things if well chosen;
Then to bind each ingredient,
You’ll find it expedient,
Of Eggs to put in half a dozen.

Some milk don’t refuse it,
But boiled ere you use it,
A proper hint this for its maker;
And the whole when compleat,
In a pan clean and neat,
With care recommend to the baker.

In praise of this pudding,
I vouch it a good one,
Or should you suspect a fond word;
To every Guest,
Perhaps it is best,
Two puddings should smoke on the board.

Two puddings!– yet – no,
For if one will do,
The other comes in out of season;
And these lines but obey,
Nor can anyone say,
That this pudding’s with-out rhyme or reason

Contributed by Mrs. Cassandra Austen(Jane’s mother) to Martha Lloyd’s collection of recipes, 1808The Poetry of Jane Austen and the Austen Family  by David Selwyn (Editor)

Jane Austin

Jane Austin

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