Tag Archives: Englsih muffins

Not a Pizza

I know, you can have an

English Muffin Pizza

Thomas_recipe_PizzaMuffinEM

Thomas’s English Muffins Pizza-ed

But what if you took a tortilla instead of an English Muffin???

tortillas - flour

Flour tortillas

And What IF you happened to have hummus instead of sauce?

hummus container.png

and then you added just a little cheese….and popped it into a hot oven…It WAS a cold night….and when you took it out you folded it in half to eat it…

Besides Supper  – what would you call it?

It’s Pizza-ish, but not pizza.

The best I could come up with is Quesa-rizza – the place in between the quesadilla and the pizza. Or not.The ‘R’ in the middle is a Massachusetts thing.

My son would combine a burrito inside a little pizza and called it a burr-izza.

♦◊♦

And then the 17th century calls….Spring Training  is not just for the Red Sox.

Time to get ready to get back to 1624….

NEHome

and one of my faves slides…

goatmilking

and then there’s the rest of the PowerPoint, but I don’t know how to link. The Pilgrim ate more meals then just “The First Thanksgiving” is the point of the PowerPoint.

 

 

AND…..

Vinca_minor_Nashville

Vinca – also know as creeping myrtle and periwinkle is creeping everywhere. Did I miss the crocuses and snowdrops?

St Patrick

saint patrick

Snakes be gone!

his day is approaching ….all the green around here isn’t just Spring springing.

Time to make the soda bread. Paula Marcoux has a great recipe at this edible South Shore and South Coast link:

One Loaf of Soda Bread – HOLD THE BLARNEY

 

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Filed under Irish, Pizza, Supper, winter

Odds and Ends

One thing I’d like to end is :

SNOW

snow forrest 1440x900

Winter Wonder-is this snow ever going to end-  Land

It started snowing again. It wasn’t supposed to start for a couple of hours, AFTER I would have finished writing…and now I’m totally distracted.

It’s not like snow is food….except sometimes when it is:

FoodNetwork Snow Recipes click it

More snow = more shoveling.

There is a Zen of shoveling, a Tao of shoveling, a Way of shoveling.

tao imageAnd the way is thus –

Think not of this snow, but the next snow.

Where will the next snow go?

This snow must go beyond next snow.

Always shovel for the next snow.

snowfallJanuary_2015_nor'easter_snowfall_in_Watertown,_MA

shovel shovel scrape salt shovel shovel scrape lift with your knees and not your back shovel and rest

I’ve been making English muffins, some good, some odd, some far too large, and I think I’m closing in on the muffin that will not be just English, but mine.

March 1st is the Feast of Saint David, patron saint of Wales, also known as Saint Tavy – he’s the leek saint. I’ve been making leek and potato soup and I’ve got a great little book titled

First You Take A Leek

You can buy this on Amazon - some of this stuff I just can't make up!

You can buy this on Amazon – some of this stuff I just can’t make up!

But I’m not writing about that, either, because there is snow falling, and it distracts me and takes my attention.

Should I start shoveling now? Should I wait? Is it fluffy snow? Is it heavy? Do I have enough salt for the stairs and the sidewalk?

Even at night when it’s not snowing, huge heavy trucks have been driving by, shifting gears on the slight incline in front of my house, slowing down to take the corner at the next street three houses down, no rest for the snow weary.

Big trucks carrying snow.

snow trrain

This would be a much quieter snow truck, but this truck has not been in my neighborhood.

This would be a much quieter snow truck, but this truck has not been in my neighborhood.

This snow truck - unless it's really a snow car - we have several of these in the neighborhood.

This snow truck – unless it’s really a snow car – we have several of these in the neighborhood.

And so the Way of Snow is the Way of Shovel…what does snow weigh?

wxwhyTheWeightOfSnow385X289X96

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Filed under Eating, winter

Muffings (English implied)

Wicked Way-Back Wednesday

English muffings from the 18th century.

For version for a 21st century cook, see Paula Marcoux’s Cooking with Fire

Cooking with Fire by Paula Marcoux

Cooking with Fire by Paula Marcoux

To make Muffings and Oat-Cakes.

To a buſhel of Hertfordſhire white flour, take a Pint and a half of good Ale-yeaſt, from pale Malt, if you can get it, becauſe it is whiteſt ; let the Yeaſt lie in Water all Night, the next Day pour off the Water clear, make two Gallons of Water juſt Milk warm, not to ſcald your Yeaſt, and two Ounces of Salt ; mix your Water, Yeaſt, and Salt well together for about a quarter of an Hour, then ſtrain it and mix up your Dough as light as poſſible, and let it lie in your Trough an Hour to riſe, then with your Hand roll it and pull it into little Pieces about as big as a large Walnut, roll them with your Hand like a Ball, lay them on your Table, and as faſt as you do them lay a Piece of Flannel over them, and be ſure to keep your Dough cover’d with Flannel ; when you have rolled out all your Dough begin to bake the firſt, and by that Time they will be ſpread out in the right Form ; lay them on your Iron ; as one Side begins to change Colour turn the other, and take great Care they don’t burn, or be too much diſcolour’d, but that you will be a Judge off in two or three Makings. Take care the middle of the iron is not too hot, as it will be, but then you may put a Brick-bat or two in the middle of the Fire to ſlacken the Heat. The Thing you bake on muſt be made thus:
Build a Place juſt as if you was going to ſet a Copper, and in the ſtead of a Copper, a Piece of Iron all over the Top fix’d in Form juſt the ſame as the Bottom of an Iron Pot, and make your fire underneath with Coal as in a Copper: obſerve, Muffings are made the ſame Way ; only this, when you pull them to Pieces roll them in a good deal of Flour, and with a Rolling-pin roll them thin, cover them with a Piece of Flannel, and they will riſe a proper Thickneſs ; and if you find them too big or too little, you muſt roll Dough accordingly. Theſe muſt not be the leaſt diſcoloured.
And when you eat them, toaſt them with a Fork criſp on both Sides, then with your Hand pull them open, and they will be like a Honey-Comb ; lay in as much butter as you intend to uſe, then clap them together again, and ſet it by the Fire. When you think the Butter is melted turn them, that both Sides may be butter’d alike, but don’t touch them with a Knife, either to spread or cut them open, if you do they will be as heavy as Lead, only when they are quite buttered and done, you may cut them acroſs with a knife.
Note, Some Flour will ſoak up a Quart or three Pints more water than other Flour ; then you muſt add more Water, or ſhake in more Flour in making up, for the Dough muſt be as light as poſſible.

(The intial transcript came from Celtnet – then I added the random caps and italics from the Prospect Books edition.

Read more at Celtnet: http://www.celtnet.org.uk/recipes/glasse-wine-brewing-bread-17.php
Copyright © celtnet)

“First Catch Your Hare…” The Art of Cookery Made Plain and Easy. A Lady (Hannah Glasse). Facsimile of the first edition, 1747. Prospect Books, 1995. p. 151.

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