Tag Archives: custard

Are you going to Marlborough Fair?

Not to be confused with Scarborough Fair….or the song of that name.

Marlborough Pie is a rich, enriched sort of custard and apple concoction that is far too easy and good, good, good to have ever fallen out of favor.

And now seems to be having a teeny-tiny rebirth.

First – there are various historic sites that keep it alive, thank you Old Sturbridge Village

Here’s Ryan Beckman on  pie

and then a story on Eater : what-is-marlborough-pie

…which could be why I’ve been fielding Marlborugh Pie questions all week…

Here’s a recipe from OSV

Marlbor pud RX

There;’s a certain (tasty) place where pie and pudding intersect. Pudding Pie is a real (GOOD) thing.

marlbor pud OSV

Tastes like a million bucks! Don’t skimp on the sherry…

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Filed under Autumn, Pie, Thanksgiving, Wicked Wayback

May on July

A bill of Fare for July.

Muskmelons.Muskmelon
1 Pottage of Capon.
2 Boil’d Pigeons.
3 A hash of Caponets.
4 A Grand Sallet.

German School, 17th 17th Century  German School A bowl of spinach and eggs with a pewter dish

German School, 17th 17th Century German School A bowl of spinach and eggs and roasted quail with a pewter dish. The spinach with eggs is a more ordinary boiled salad – a grans salad is…grander.

 

5 A Fawn.
6 A Custard.

A Second Course.

1 Pease, of French Beans.

French beans are also known now as green bean..I think the pease of the beans are the little seeds within. This would make this dish extremely delicate and dainty!

French beans are also known now as green bean..I think the pease of the beans are the little seeds within. This would make this dish extremely delicate and dainty!

2 Gulls four, two larded.

black legged kittiwake

black legged kittiwake – gulls are also called mews or mouettes

3 Pewits eight, four larded.

Pewits are now more commonly called Northern lapwings

Pewits are now more commonly called Northern lapwings

4 A quodling Tart green.
5 Portugal eggs, two sorts.
6 Buttered Brawn.
Selsey Cockles broil’d.

Ben Johson. Volpone. Act 1. Scene 2.

SIR POLITIQUE WOULD BEE:

“In oranges, musk-melons, and such like: sometimes in Colchester-oysters, and your Selsey-cockles.’

Selsey is in West Sussex  – Colchester is in Essex – so this is shell fish coming from both sides of England.

He's holdonmg a gridiron, perhaps waiting to broil some cockles - can anyone translate the caption?

He’s holding a gridiron, perhaps waiting to broil some cockles – can anyone translate the caption?

Robert May. The Accomplist Cook.

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Filed under Books, Eating, The 17th century, Uncategorized