Tag Archives: cinnamon

Toast

Toast is sooo underrated……

Toast and Cheese  from food52

toast toaster

Toast Toaster – mosaic of 3,053 pieces of toast

Check out the artist here

Boston Cream Pie French Toast from King Arthur Flour here

As IF - either French Toast OR Boston Cream Pie weren't enough...Thank you, King Arthur Flour for putting them together!

As IF – either French Toast OR Boston Cream Pie weren’t enough…Thank you, King Arthur Flour for putting them together!

Toast

is such a little word that holds so many meanings..

It’s tea and toast,

Toast fork - to make toast old school

Toast fork – to make toast old school

Cinnamon toast, and therefore cinnamon toast crunch

cinnamon toast

SONY DSC

SONY DSC

A toast sandwich is a sandwich made by putting a thin slice of toast between two thin slices of bread with a layer of butter, and adding salt and pepper to taste. Its origins can be traced to the Victorian years. A recipe for making it is included in the 1861 Book of Household Management by Isabella Beeton

Toast sandwich

Toast sandwich

Sweet or savory, breakfast or supper, summer or winter…..toast is a Good Thing.

Toast-3

Toast – ordinary bread improved.

Georg Flegel. Still-Life with Clove Pinks - 1630-1635.

Georg Flegel. Still-Life with Clove Pinks – 1630-1635. Toast soldiers!

Some 17th century toasts……..

Toasts of Divers sorts.

First, in Butter or Oyl.

Take a cast of fine roals or round manchet, chip them, and cut them onto toasts, fry them in clarified butter, frying oil, or sallet oyl, but before you fry them, dip them in fair water, and being fried, serve them in a clean dish piled one upon another, and sugar between.

  1. 175.

Otherways.

Toste them before the fire, and run them over with butter, sugar, or oyl.

  1. 175

Cinamon Toasts.

Cut fine thin toasts, then toast them on a gridiron, and lay them in ranks in a dish, put to them fine beaten cinamon mixed with sugar and some claret, warm them over the fire, and serve them hot.

  1. 176.

French Toasts.

Cut French bread, and toast it in pretty thick toasts on a clean gridiron, and serve them steeped in claret, sack, or any wine, with sugar and juyce of orange.

  1. 176
  2. Robert May. The Accomplist Cook. Prospect Book ed. pp noted.
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Filed under Recipe, Wicked Wayback

Cinnamon Rollin’

Christmas is when you need the familiar, the comfortable and the delicious.

Cinnamon rolls  to the rescue!

But not just ANY rolls, no, these are special rolls.

From an old family recipe  – from my son’s other side, in memory of Grandma B. Her family had put together a cookbook, so we had actual recipes to work with.

Everyone loved Grandma’s Cinnamon Rolls, so they are a sweet remembrance of her.

This is a Swedish Kanelbulle, which is the family of cinnamon rolls that Grandma had made. Notice that there is no icing. Believe you me, they don't need it!

This is a Swedish Kanelbulle, which is in the family of cinnamon rolls that Grandma had made. Notice that there is no icing. Believe you me, they don’t need it!

Cinnamon Rolls

All ingredients from white yeast bread

Cinnamon

Sugar

Butter

Follow all instructions for “White Yeast Bread” through the first paragraph.

Cut dough into 2 portions. Roll one into a rectangle and cut in half lengthwise. Combine sugar and cinnamon until it’s the color of cinnamon toast. Melt butter and add sugar mixture, keeping sugar wet but not too runny, Spread over dough not solid but not too sparsely. Cut into 1 inch strips. Roll and lay on the side in a greased pan. Be sure to leave pans that leave no extra space.   Cover the ½ of the dough and repeat, until all dough is gone. Allow to rise, covered, for one hour. Bake at 400° for approximately 30 minutes. Cover with foil if browning too fast. Top with butter after removing from oven.

White Yeast Bread

1 pkg. yeast  – I buy  yeast in bulk – by the jar or by the pound and store it in the freezer. I use a yeast measure spoon

Yeast Measure spoon - I got mine from King Arthur Flour. You can order a pound of yeast from them for less then the little bitty jar in the grocery store and do a whole lot more baking. I keep a pound of dry yeast in a 1 quart wide-mouth mason jar in the freezer.

Yeast Measure spoon – I got mine from King Arthur Flour. You can order a pound of yeast from them for less then the little bitty jar in the grocery store and do a whole lot more baking. I keep a pound of dry yeast in a 1 quart wide-mouth mason jar in the freezer.

¼ c. water

2 c. scalded milk (whole milk)

2 T. sugar

2 tsp. salt

1 T. shortening (we used butter)

6 c. flour (King Arthur Flour white)

Soften yeast in warm water (110°). Combine hot milk, sugar, salt and shortening. Cool to lukewarm. Stir in 2 cups flour; beat well. Add yeast; mix. ( add the rest of the flour) Shape into a ball; place in a greased bowl and turn over, cover; let rise about 1 ½ hours. Punch down. Let rise another 45 minutes.

Cut dough into 2 portions. Shape each into a ball and let rise for 10 minutes. Shape into loaves and put into greased loaf pans. Allow to rise 1 hour. Bake at 400° for approximately 35 minutes. Cover with foil if browning too fast. Top with butter after removing from oven. Makes 2 loaves.

Am Moak, p. 29. family cookbook

More notes from 2014 – what we did (more or less)

  • Figured on a double double –we wanted 3 9×13 plus 2 9×9 – made 3 9×13 plus 3 9×9 AND 2 loaves of white bread plus buns for me …..
  • A double double is a whole lotta buns!
  • We figured a double as 2 9×13 trays
  • Used the paper baking pans…..they were firmer then the disposable aluminum and they had lids, making them great for transport.  And no washing up or worrying about getting them back.
  • Dark brown sugar – light brown would have worked, too.
  • Lots of butter
  • 1 loaf = 1 9×13 or 2 9” pans (we thought)
  • We also made 2 loaves because rolls seemed to go on forever.

23 Dec 2014

1 pm begin – 5:15 is wrap – he took home one large and 2 small trays as well as 2 loaves white bread; I have the 2 large and 1 small tray to take to Pembroke.

Heat 4 C milk

12 C flour

2 packet yeast (the magic yeast spoon) w/ ½ C water

4 T sugar

4 t salt

Mix together. Knead until smooth. Let raise 2 hrs

2 ½ sticks butter, melted

  • 2 # brown sugar
  • 2C white sugar 2 oz cinnamon a little rum

for a double

We did this twice; the second time, with the wicked cheap $1.29 a 2 ½ oz bottle of cinnamon was better – either we’ve grown accustomed to cassia or it just works better with fat and alcohol.

There was a little left over for my own Xmas morning buns.

Notes on the paper pans – they caught fire – but just a little. Everyone was very calm and just put the little fire out. I’m currently in the market for nonstick 9x13s that have covers. Problem solved.

paper baking pans - don't let them touch the sides of the oven. It said don't use over 425 and we didn't. I keep them in the 350 range. Should I ever use them again. Probably NOT.

Paper baking pans – don’t let them touch the sides of the oven. It said don’t use over 425 and we didn’t. I would keep them in the 350 range. Should I ever use them again. Probably NOT.

Rollin’ in a River of Cinnamon Love

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Wine with a Twist (cookies)

These are cookies that have wine IN them.  They are better with coffee then they are with  wine. This is a variation that I had to depend on one year when I LOST THE RECIPE. It wasn’t really, really lost, and I have since found it. The problem was

I ORGANIZED MY RECIPES

recipe box

I have since found it, but , of course, I couldn’t put my hot little hands on it this morning. Because I organized my recipes – again. Or some of them. Sorta.

Now, I have organized my recipes more then once. More then twice. More then….you get the picture.

Boxes

recipe box image

And by boxes, I mean more then one. More then 2……

Binders

recipe-binder-

and by binders, I mean more then one. More then 2….you get the picture

Recipe cards

free-recipe-card-template

Assorted sizes and designs. Most of them are as blank as this one.

and then then there are odd slips of paper tucked into cookbooks……and the digital diaster….but but enough whine

…on to wine cookies …

Wine cookies have already been requested for this Christmas.  My mother asks for them. So they’re on the list. I’ll be baking them her kitchen.

For the last several years, I’ve gone to the ancestral home for cookie baking marathons because

  1. there’s just plain more room at the ancestral home and
  2. my mother tells stories of her family when there are cookies in the oven
  3. and…it’s more fun with other people around. Who come around when they hear that cookies are being baked.

One version of

WINE BISCOTI

4 2/3 cups of AP flour

½ teaspoon baking powder

½ cup sugar

¼ – 1 teaspoon anise seeds (How much anise taste do you like? If you prefer, ½ teaspoon anise extract or 1 teaspoon anise flavored liquor. Add the seeds with the drys – the liquids with the wets….)

¾ cup red wine

2/3 cup EVO

Topping:

¼ cup sugar

2 Tablespoons sugar

 

  1. Preheat oven to 350° and line a baking sheet with non-stick foil, parchment paper or a silpat sheet.
  2. In a bowl, combine flour, baking powder, sugar and anise seeds. Mix well with a whisk.
  3. Add the wine and olive oil (*and extract) and stir all together with a wooden spoon to form a soft dough (adjust with more flour if too wet and more wine/oil if too dry).
  4. In a smaller bowl, combine the ¼ cup sugar with the cinnamon and set aside.
  5. Scoop out Tablespoons of dough and form them into ball 1inch in diameter. Roll the balls into the sugar/cinnamon mix and place 1 inch apart on the prepared baking sheet.
  6. Bake in a 350° oven for 15 – 20 minutes or until golden.
  7. Remove from baking sheet and cool on a rack.

From Italian Cooking and Living May 2006, p. 16.

Italian Cooking and Living  not the issue with the cookie recipe

Italian Cooking and Living not the issue with the cookie recipe

wine cookies made with white wine and formed into rings

wine cookies made with white wine and formed into rings

 

Wine cookies made with red wine and made into a snail

Wine cookies made with red wine and made into a snails

 

Wine cookies with a twist

Wine with a twist cookie

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Filed under Christmas, Holiday, Italian, Recipe

Super (Salad) Bowl Sunday

I am not a football fan, but it’s Superbowl Sunday and football is hard to avoid/ignore/escape on this day.

So I offer my own Super Bowl –  a really great middle of winter salad. It has the color and flavor and scent of a warm and exotic and very NOT New England place. It’s not a terribly locavore sort of thing for New England. Sometimes the mere sound of the word ‘locavore‘ makes me crave the not from ’round here’. Turnips and bacon and dried beans can wait for another day.

Today is rich and sweet and fragrant and bright and sharp, all at the same time.

Oh, yes, this is one Super Salad.

This salad is from Paula Wolfert’s Mediterranean Cooking.

Mediterranean Cooking - Paula Wolfert

Mediterranean Cooking – Paula Wolfert

I’ve cut down the original recipe to serve one (or two – it depends, too, on what else you’re serving. And who.).

Salata Letchine

Serves 1 or 2

Romaine lettuce – ½ a head (or however much makes a salad for you)

Romaine lettuce

Romaine lettuce

1 orange

Just one will do - sometimes I use 2 clemetines

Just one will do – sometimes I use 2 clementines

2 tsp lemon juice

Wash the lemon. Juice the lemon, take what you need and FREEZE the rest. Grate the rind and save that too.If you're feeling extremely frugal, plant the seeds to see if you can make little lemon trees. I don't try this in the Winter because my house isn't citrus sprouting warm then.

Wash the lemon. Juice the lemon, take what you need and FREEZE the rest. Grate the rind and save that too.If you’re feeling extremely frugal, plant the seeds to see if you can make little lemon trees. I don’t try this in the Winter because my house isn’t citrus sprouting warm then.

2 tsp sugar

Sugar

Sugar

Pinch each of salt and cinnamon

salt (this is kosher, which is what I usually use)

salt (this is kosher, which is what I usually use)

You'll want the powdery stuff

You’ll want the powdery stuff

2 tsp orange juice

If you don't have orange juice on hand - juice an orange - then you'll need 2 oranges

If you don’t have orange juice on hand – juice an orange – then you’ll need 2 oranges

1 tsp orange flower water

Make sure your orange flower water is food grade - it's also great in cold bubbly drinks (Prosecco) in the summer

Make sure your orange flower water is food grade – it’s also great in cold bubbly drinks (Prosecco) in the summer!

1 oz chopped dates

You can also buy chopped dates (sometimes it's the only option offered, which is how I cam up with a weight - otherwise 2 or 3

You can also buy chopped dates (sometimes it’s the only option offered, which is how I came up with a weight ) otherwise 2 or 3

1 oz chopped blanched toasted almonds

These are smoked almonds - what you have, what you like

These are smoked almonds – what you have, what you like

  1. Wash, dry and shred lettuce.
  2.  Peel orange and separate into sections.
  3. Mix lemon juice, sugar, salt, cinnamon, orange juice and orange flower water together.
  4. Just before serving, pour most of the dressing over the lettuce and toss. Put the orange sections on top of the lettuce. Top with the dates and almonds. Dribble the remaining dressing over the top.
  5. Dust with a little more cinnamon.
  6. Serve at once.

Adapted from Paula Wolfret Mediterranean Cooking. 1994, rev. ed. p. 287.

 

 

 

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