Tag Archives: chocolate

Fourth of July Menu, Early 20th Century

The 45 star flag of 1901.(banner)

WhiteHouseCookBook001

The White House Cook Book was first released in 1894, and was updated regularly.

TO THE

WIVES OF OUR PRESIDENTS,

THOSE NOBLE WOMEN WHO HAVE GRACED THE

WHITE HOUSE

DEAR TO ALL AMERICANS,

THIS VOLUME

IS AFFECTIONATELY DEDICATED

BY THE AUTHOR.

In between the recipes and household hints there are portraits of the first ladies…..all of them up to 1900 in this 1901 edition.

There are also menus for the whole  year, of breakfast, dinner, and supper suggestions for each day of a week for each month of the year, as well as special whole day holiday menus.

New Year’s Day has a menu, as does Washington’s Birthday (which includes Washington Pie for dinner, but also English Pound Cake for supper…)

July begins with a

TR flag 1901

FOURTH OF JULY.

BREAKFAST.

Red Raspberries and Cream

Fried Chicken 86.   Scrambled Tomatoes 196.

Warmed Potatoes 186.     Tennessee Muffins 245.

Toast 268.

Coffee 487.

DINNER.

Clam Soup 46.

Boiled Cod 68., with Lobster Sauce 150.

Roast Lamb 136. With Mint Sauce 152.

New Potatoes Boiled 183.

Green Peas 201.    Spinach with Eggs 202.

Cucumbers Sliced 167

Chicken Patties 85

Naple Biscuits 343.  Vanilla Ice-cream 357.

Chocolate Macaroons 358.   Strawberries.

Coffee 437.

 

SUPPER.

Cold Sliced Lamb 134.

Crab Pie 69. Water-cress Salad 168. Cheese Toast 264.

Graham Bread 234.  Sponge Cake 277.

Blackberries. Tea 439.

 

p. 468 White House CB

I was interested to see Green Peas and New Potatoes for the Fourth, as well as Boiled Cod with Lobster Sauce, even though it’s not quite Poached Salmon and Egg Sauce…..

But wait –

are those

MACAROONS

for dessert at dinner?????

Macaroons again? You spend some time with a recipes, and it turns up EVERYWHERE

Although this time in chocolate….

Chocolate Macaroons

PUT three ounces of plain chocolate in a pan and melt on a slow fire; then work it to a thick paste with one pound of powdered sugar and the whites of three eggs; roll the mixture down to the thickness of about one-quarter of an inch; cut it in small, round pieces with a paste-cutter, either plain or scalloped; butter a pan slightly, and dust it with flour and sugar in equal quantities; place in it the pieces of paste or mixture, and bake in a hot but not too quick oven.

  1. Ziemann, Hugo and Mrs. F. L. Gillette. The White House Cook Book. The Saalfield Publishing Co.: New York-Akron-Chicago. p. 353.

45starflag

Can you name the five states that joined the Union in the 20th century?

Talk amongst yourselves…..

Happy Fourth!

 

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Filed under Holiday, New England, Recipe, Summer, Wicked Wayback

Birthday Cake!

Today is someone’s birthday….

Well, that’s true about every day, but today it’s someone close to me….

Jacob and me

and much, much taller then he was twenty five years ago!

I found the recipe I used for his fifth birthday, so it seemed time to use it again.

First, get out the trusty 9×13 pan

13x9-pan nordicware bake and store

one with a lid…and get to work.

Chocolate Birthday Cake

2 eggs

1 ½ cups firm packed brown sugar

2 oz (2 squares) unsweetened baking chocolate, melted

2 cups sifted cake flour (like I had a 5 year old and cake flour in the house at the same time – HA!)

1 t. baking soda

½ t. salt

¼ C white vinegar

¾ C milk

1 t vanilla extract

½ C butter, softened

  1. Preheat oven to 350°
  2. Have all the ingredients at room temp
  3. Butter and flour a 13x9x2-inch pan.*(I used a pan that has its own travel lid.)
  4. Sift together flour, baking soda and salt (the Drys)
  5. Separately, combine vinegar, milk and vanilla (the Wets)
  6. In a big, deep bowl beat together eggs, brown sugar and chocolate (3 minutes by hand – 1 minute with an electric Mixer)
  7. Into the big, deep add the drys and half the wets.
  8. Beat 3 minutes by hand and or 1 minute electric.
  9. Add the rest of the wets and beat for another minute.
  10. Pour into the prepared pan.
  11. Bake for 45 minutes or until it shrinks from the sides of the pan and tests done.
  12. Cool completely and frost.

*or 2 8-inch layer cake pans

– Adapted from ‘3-Minute Fudge Cake’ in Nika Hazelton. From Nika Hazelton’s Kitchen. Viking Penguin. 1985. p. 298.

from-nika-hazeltons-kitchen

And don’t forget the candles – and some matches….

Birthday-Cakecandles closeup

Happy Birthday!

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Filed under 1990's, Birthday, Cake, Holiday, Recipe, Summer

Susie’s Brownies

Susie loves to bake and she bakes great cakes. Susie makes some pretty awesome brownies, too, and since her sons are grown and live away, she doesn’t bake as often as she used to. Often when she does bake, she brings in plates of things to share with all of us at work because otherwise it’s too much. We do not object.

Susie makes a mint chocolate brownie that is simply divine – fudgy, rich and just a hint, a whiff of mint. So often mint overpowers the party, but not on this plate.

Susie has been making brownies with the Ghirardelli’s sweet ground cocoa.

Ghiradelli sweet ground cocoa

She also adds chocolate chips and Andes crème de menthe baking bits to thoroughly gild this lily. The Andes bits are fairly fantastic because they’re not too mint, encased as they are in chocolate.

Andes creme de menthe chips

The recipe is on the back of the Ghirardelli Sweet Ground Cocoa bag. Susie left me a bag full of ingredients (talk about your Merry Christmas) with a note that said she didn’t use the baking soda.

I started getting ready:

Oven to 350° (open it and make a quick check that nothing besides the racks are lurking there….)

2 eggs; ¼ cup sugar; 1 tsp vanilla;

½ cup butter

……and it needs to be melted – this is a job for the new mini-saucepan! Don’t throw that butter wrapper away – use it to grease the pan [I have a baggie in the freezer for saving butter wrappers].

¾ cup Ghirardelli Sweet Ground Cocoa (note: this is on the bag, too:Unsweetened Cocoa Substitution: For each ½ cup Unsweetened Cocoa, use 1 cup of Sweet Ground Cocoa and decrease the amount of sugar the recipe calls for by ½ cup.” In short, the Sweet Ground stuff is equal amounts of cocoa and sugar, adjust accordingly.

2/3 cup unsifted flour

¼ teaspoon baking powder*

(*When Susie left me a note that she said doesn’t include the baking soda,  I went through and as there was no baking soda, I put the baking powder in. Later, I realized she must have meant baking powder; the brownies from the batch I put it into were still good and squidgy…you’re on your own here. I’m sure Alton Brown has a video somewhere of the difference between leavens in the brownies or not, probably called “Welcome to the Dark Side: The Brownie Apocalypse”….but I digress.)

AB

¼ tsp salt; ½ cup of walnuts, chopped; ½ cup chocolate chips and ½ cup creme de menthe bits

  • Grease an 8 or 9 inch pan.
  • Beat the eggs with the sugar and vanilla, add butter.
  • Mix the cocoa, flour and salt together.
  • Add the drys to the wets, stirring well.
  • Stir in the nuts and then the chips.
  • Spread into the prepared pan.
  • Bake 20-30 minutes.
    • From bag: for extra chewy brownies, use 9” pan and longer baking time.
  • Cut into squares. Makes 16-20 brownies. Serves 2 (or more if they insist….)

Adapted from the back of the Ghirardelli’s Sweet Cocoa Powder bag, notes and technical assistance from Susie Walker.

 

PS – Alton Brown HAS covered the brownie…..

ABbrownie message

Here’s the link to his website

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To make Chocolate Cream

In 1604 Lady Elynor Fetiplace put together a commonplace book – her receipts for food and medicine.  In 1986 Hilary Spurling published excerpts form this collection, with notes and explanations.

EF pb

This is how I first met Elynor Fetiplace back in the 1980’s.

I was able to borrow this volume, but somehow I never bought a copy for myself.

It wasn’t until this century that I got the transcription from Stuart Press. (The Complete Receipt Book of Ladie Elynor Fetiplace: Late Tudor/early Stuart. Never before published in full this is a 3 volume set transcription of the whole original text. About 90% of the work is household remedies from a country gentlewoman the remainder mainly culinary. Stuart Press    )

ef complete3

In historical documents, nothing beats the real thing. Lacking that, the next best thing is an image of the real thing, a photocopy or an electronic image, some sort of facsimile. But even then there are nuances that can be easily overlooked. Skepticism is an important tool of historical research. Transcript is next best from that, and it’s  only if you assume some  error and omission are present.The question is where and what…..and move forward anyhow.

And in this transcript is a recipe To make Chocolate Cream. It’s on the same page as a Barley Cream.

.

Chocolate Melendez

Luis Melendez – that’s a chocolate pot with the handle from a chocolate mill in the background

 

To make Chocolate Cream

Take a Quart of cream, 3 ounces of Chocolate grated, boyle it well together & let it stand till tis cold, & then put in ye whites of 6 Eggs beaten to a froth & sweeten it to your Taste, and then mill it up.

The Complete Receipt Book of Ladie Elynor Fetiplace. Vol. Three. Transcription. Stuart Press: 1999. p.38.

To Make Chocolate Cream in January 2016:

  • Take a quart of cream – we used heavy whipping cream
  • 3 ounces chocolate – we use a 2.7 ounce disk of Taza
  • TazaClassicCollection_large

    the one that was most chocolate and no added anything

    Grate the chocolate into the cream and heat, while stirring to get the chocolate all melted

  • ChocolatePot 1682

    This is a 17th century chocolate pot. If you look close at the bottom of the pot there’s a chocolate mill there, too.

    The ‘A’ plan for cooling this off was to pour it out of the pot and into a bowl, which we could put in the snow…but no snow this January day, not even very much cold (this is NOT a complaint!) so we had to haul it into a fridge to cool.

  • Because 21st century chicken aren’t raised quite the way they were in the past, and Salmonella is an issue with raw eggs, I had searched , unsuccessfully for pasteurized eggs. I ended up with pasteurized egg whites, so we didn’t actually crack any eggs for this dish.  used a wire whisk for the whipping, lacking a chocolate mill.
  • chocolate mills 1687 French

    1687 French mills – Bleguy

    choc whip frotehr

    sold on Amazon as a Wooden Whisk Stirrer Molinillo Mexican Chocolate Cocoa Stirrer Frother. Yep, that about sums it up.

     

    Sweetened with a little sugar, whipped some more……

     

    chocolate cream 30Jan2016

    This is what our final product looked like – a very light very tasty chocolate mouse sort of dish.

    There was none left.

That good.

Sometimes the past should be repeated.

Again and again.

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Filed under Recipe, The 17th century, Wicked Wayback, winter

Happy Birthday, Jane Austen!

Jane_Austen_coloured_version

Many happy returns of the day!

Jane Austen was born this day in 1775, making this the 240th anniversary of her birth.

And shortly thereafter in 1779, this book was born….

Giovanni Anfossi, Dell'uso ed abuso della cioccolata (Venice, 1779).

Giovanni Anfossi, Dell’uso ed abuso della cioccolata (Venice, 1779).

This book is all about how BAD chocolate is for you. Jane Austen did not agree.

For although there is plentiful tea in the collected works of Jane Austen, there is also a little chocolate

He took his own cocoa from the tray, which seemed provided with almost as many teapots as there were persons in company —

Miss Parker drinking one sort of herb tea and Miss Diana another — and turning completely to the fire, sat coddling and cooking it to his own satisfaction and toasting some slices of bread, brought up ready-prepared in the toast rack; and till it was all done, she heard nothing of his voice but the murmuring of a few broken sentences of self-approbation and success. When his toils were over, however, he moved back his chair into as gallant a line as ever, and proved that he had not been working only for himself by his earnest invitation to her to take both cocoa and toast. She was already helped to tea — which surprised him, so totally self-engrossed had he been. “l thought I should have been in time,” said he, “but cocoa takes a great deal of boiling.” “l am much obliged to you,” replied Charlotte. “But I prefer tea.” “Then l will help myself,” said he. “A large dish of rather weak cocoa every evening agrees with me better than anything.” lt struck her, however, as he poured out this rather weak cocoa, that it came forth in a very fine, dark-coloured stream; and at the same moment, his sisters both crying out, “Oh, Arthur, you get your cocoa stronger and stronger every evening,” with Arthur’s somewhat conscious reply of “Tis rather stronger than it should be tonight”
–Sanditon, by Jane Austen, 1817

Printing

This iconic Walter Baker Chocolate logo was painted in the 18th century

Because the weather is supposed to cooler – it’s practically Winter, so it might even be COLD (but I’m not complaining) and the sound of Christmas carols is everywhere, and I saw this use of a Pilgrim reproduction object:

beercup with marshmallow

It’s a beer cup, re-purposed as a hot chocolate with marshmallows cup. Genius!

A Chocolate Cup Jane Austen might recognize:

Chocolate_cup_Chantilly_porcelain_18th_century

And a hot chocolate recipe she might use:

From Mrs Rundell’s Domestic Cookery, 1859.

books_003

And a little https://www.youtube.com/embed/E3fX2_bxEkg” target=”_blank”>Hot Chocolate from a little more recently…..

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Filed under Recipe, The 1970's, winter

Cranberry Season

The magazine stands are  full of

THANKSGIVING ISSUES

The most wonderful time of the year!

Pumpkins! Turkeys! Cranberries! Cranberries! Cranberries! Especially the cranberries!!!!!!

Having spent most of my life in Plymouth County, where cranberries are the leading agricultural commodity, I’m a major fan-girl.

Cranberry_bog

Cranberry Sauce. Cranberry Compote. Cranberry Chutney. Cranberry Tart. Cranberry Cake. Cranberry Sauce IN Cake, seriously in this Outrageous Chocolate Fudge Cranberry Fudge Cake from Ocean Spray, which Beth, who drinks kale with chia seed shakes for breakfast (yes, CHIA, as in chi-chi-chi- chia) and all sorts of other healthy, hale and hearty foods  chia petrecommended and made and shared…outrageously glorious cake!

This is the picture from the Ocean Spray site -

This is the picture from the Ocean Spray site …it tastes as good as this looks! Maybe better…..

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Block off the Ole Chip

Chocolatebrownie

Block of brownie goodness made from chocolate chips – and  few other basics.

Basic brownie history from New England Recipe website – click it

Basic Brownie

1/3 cup butter

¾ cup sugar

2 Tbl H2O

1 12-oz bag chocolate chips, divided (whatever kind of chips you want – mix it up)

1 tsp vanilla

2 eggs

¾ cup flour

¼ tsp baking soda

¼ tsp salt

  1. Grease a 9×9 pan and preheat the oven to 325°.
  2. In a large saucepan combine butter, sugar and water. Bring just to a boil.
  3. Remove from heat and add ½ of the chocolate chips and the vanilla; stir until chips are melted and mixture is smooth.
  4. Add eggs, one at a time.
  5. Gradually add flour, soda and salt.
  6. Stir in remaining chips.
  7. Spread in the greased 9×9 pan.
  8. Bake 30-35 minutes.
  9. Cool completely before cutting.
  10. Makes 16 2 ¼ inch squares.

Adapted from the back of a Nestlés packet, c. 1985

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Advent is today

Advent marks the beginning of the Christmas Season.

Let the cookie baking begin!

First up is a cookie, so easy….it began with the McCalls Cooking School.McCalls Cooking schoolWe got this recipe in 1985, and immediately began tinkering with it.  Chocolate coconut macaroons are just TOO close to an Almond Joy to not keep going. almond joy barWe tried putting whole and halved almonds on top, but they baked off or got too hard.

Then we put the almond bits in.. and a little almond extract. Make them now, and then buy more sweetened flaked coconut and sweetened condensed milk and then you can make more later. Oh, Joy!

Oh, Joy! Chocolate Coconut Macaroons with Almonds

1 can (14 oz) sweetened, condensed milk (not evaporated milk)

3 squares (1 oz each) unsweetened chocolate

Dash of salt

2 cans (3 ½ oz size) or 1 package (7 oz) sweetened flaked coconut (do not use shredded coconut)

¼ cup slivered almonds

1 teaspoon almond extract

 

  1. Preheat oven to 350°
  2. Cover a baking sheet pan with foil and grease generously OR cover a baking sheet with no stick foil OR line a baking sheet with a silpat
  3. Put condensed milk, chocolate and salt in the top of a double boiler.
  4. Put over boiling water until chocolate melts and the mixture is thick and smooth
  5. Remove from the from over the boiling water and add coconut, almonds and almond extract and mi well with a wooden spoon.
  6. Drop mixture by rounded tablespoonfuls on the prepared sheet, 1 inch apart.
  7. Bake for 8-10 minutes or until cookies are set.
  8. Remove from baking sheet with a metal spatula and cool on a wire rack.

Yield: about 2 dozen macaroons.

Adapted from McCall’s Cooking School. Cakes,Cookies #40. 1985.

choccoconut macaroon

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Filed under Christmas, Holiday, Recipe, The 1980's

National Tapioca Pudding Day!

A bowl of tapioca pudding - sometimes called 'frog spawn' or 'fish eyes' to scare off the timid

A bowl of tapioca pudding – sometimes called ‘frog spawn’ or ‘fish eyes’ to scare off the timid

Who knew there was a Tapioca Pudding Consortium to rally for a National day of recognition?  Who are these tapioca aficionados? The mysteries of food and politics…..

Chocolate Tapioca pudding - egg free, gluten free, easy and tasty!

Chocolate Tapioca pudding – egg free, gluten free, easy and tasty!

Long ago , and not so far away, there was a little restaurant, really a large diner, and when we weren’t eating green macaroni and cheese for Friday night supper, we might, especially if it were summer it seems, go there for Friday night Fish and Chips. They also had tapioca pudding for dessert.  Brother number 3 had a special fondness for tapioca, and calling it fish eggs or fish eyes or anything else disgusting would not cause him to turn away. It’s also really easy to make, and adding chocolate makes this my favorite chocolate pudding. Ironically, Brother number 3 has a birthday on – you guessed it – National Tapioca Pudding Day. Many happy returns of the day, little brother! XoX

Chocolate Tapioca Pudding

1  egg

3 cups  milk

1/3 cup  sugar

3 Tbsp.  tapioca

3 oz.   semi-sweet chocolate ( chips or squares, or dark if you like it strong)

1 tsp.  vanilla (I’ve also used Kahlua or rum or anisette…..whatever liqueur you prefer or have on hand)

  1. Beat egg, milk, sugar and tapioca with wire whisk in medium saucepan until well blended; let stand 5 min. Add chocolate. So far the heat isn’t on
  2. Bring the heat up to medium until it’s  at a rolling boil. Remove from heat. Stir in vanilla.
  3. Cool 20 minutes – this stuff thickens as it cools.
  4. Stir. Serve warm or chilled.
  5. Stir again before serving.

 

 recipe from Kraft Minute Tapioca , with notes from the Kraft website

Tapioca pearls are also found in Bubble Tea - great choice for a summer's day

Tapioca pearls are also found in Bubble Tea – great choice for a hot summer’s day

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Filed under Birthday, Holiday, Perception ways, Recipe, The 1960"s

Choclava, this time with the chocolate…..

In what can only be considered a glitch in the space/time continuation, I managed to post a recipe for chocolate baklava WITHOUT ACTUALLY INCLUDING THE CHOCOLATE. I have correct that glaring/mind-boggling/insane  omission in this re-post. This is also more – much, much MORE!  – to my personal baklava/paklava/choclava story, so stayed tuned for further installments.

In the 1980’s chocolate finally came into it’s own in a way that has stayed the course.

Choclatier Magazine, Vol 1, Number 1 - I've got that

Chocolatier Magazine, Vol 1, Number 1 – I’ve got that

It was a chocolate happy decade….like anything chocolate can be UN-happy! In this  premier, charter issue of Chocolatier Magazine was the first place I saw the words ‘chocolate’  and ‘baklava’ together, two great things are are even greater together.Was I a charter subscriber? Oh, YES I was. Do I have years worth of back issues that are now commanding fairly high prices on e-Bay? Hmmm, maybe some photocopying is in order, and then…….but first, back to

CHOCLAVA

This is a word that has a happy sound.

The recipe I’m going to share is from the cookbook Caramel Knowledge, because the ’80’s gave us more then one version of the chocolate baklava, and although I remember making them, I never noted which one was THE ONE.  Sometimes there’s more then one, and that’s OK, too.

CHOCLAVA

1 # frozen filo dough

1# walnuts

½ cup sugar

1 ½ teaspoons cinnamon

3 ½ sticks unsalted butter, divided

8 (1 –ounce) squares semi-sweet chocolate (or 1-1/3 cups chips)

Syrup:

3 cups sugar

2 cups water

1 tablespoon lemon juice

  1. Thaw the filo (take it out of the freezer the night before)
  2. Chop the walnuts very fine. Add sugar and cinnamon and set aside.
  3. Trim the stack of filo sheets to the size of your raised edge baking pan – 11 x 17 or 11x 15, whichever you’ve got. Cover the stack of filo with a barely damp towel, and keep it covered while working. Dried out filo can get pretty messy……
  4. Melt 2 tablespoons of butter.
  5. Melt the remaining butter with the chocolate.
  6. Preheat the oven to 350°
  7. Brush baking pan with melted butter. Lay on one sheet of filo. Brush filo with chocolate/butter. Top with another filo sheet, brush with chocolate/butter. Repeat until you have 10 sheets of filo in the pan.
  8. After the 10th sheet is brushed with butter/chocolate, sprinkled evenly with the nut mix.
  9. Now filo with chocolate butter, and then a second one…
  10. Another ½ cup of nuts all around on top of the chocolate butter…
  11. Continue sprinkling ½ cup of nuts on every other sheet on top of the chocolate butter.
  12. The last 2 or 3 sheets should have no nuts, just chocolate butter.
  13. Chocolate butter on top of the top sheet.
  14. With a sharp knife, cut the cholava. Cut it before it’s baked or you’ll end up with a very large pan of really tasty crumbs. Really. A very messy pan of very tasty bits that can be served over ice cream, but will not look good at all on a serving plate. Make a series of parallel cuts one inch apart down the length of the pan, then make diagonal cuts 2 inches apart from the side to make the classic diamond shaped pieces. Or make squares.
  15. baklava-diagram

    This is a diagram on what the straight line/diagonal lines should look like. Or not. But if you want more then one GIANT serving, cut it before it goes into the oven and gets all crispy on you.

  16. Smooth out the top layer.
  17. Bake at 350° for 30 minutes
  18. Lower oven temp to 300° and bake for another hour.
  19. Make sugar syrup :
    1. In large saucepan stir together sugar, water and lemon juice until sugar is dissolved.
    2. Cook over high heat – without any more stirring – until mixture comes to a boil
    3. Lower heat and continue boiling for 20 minutes
  20. When the cholava is done and out of the oven and still hot, spoon about two thirds of the syrup over it
  21. About an hour later when the first part of the syrup has soaked in, spoon the rest on.
  22. Allow it to rest several hours before serving. If you didn’t cut it into pieces before you put it into the oven, go and buy some ice cream now and use the chocolaty/nutty/cinnamony/crispy/ buttery goodness as a topping…..
    1. “I am told that baklava will keep for several weeks if merely covered with plastic wrap and not refrigerated. It can also be frozen, I am informed. I don’t know. I didn’t have that much left.” Al Sicherman
    2. Ditto. KMW

Al Sicherman. Caramel Knowledge. Harper & Row, 1988.p.220.

Caramel Knowledge

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