Tag Archives: chicken

Salad Daze

Photo by Chalmers Butterfield

The Hollywood Brown Derby Cobb Salad….

The same, real Brown Derby restaurant that Lucy and Ethel went to when they went to Hollywood. The Episode  where Lucy dumps food all over a movie star – William Holden.

Holden-portrait

William Holden orders a Cobb Salad…a Hollywood Salad! A GLAMOUR Salad!!!!

Brown_Derby_Cobb_Salad_(2440195933)

Cobb Salad – named after a Brown Derby owner, Bob Cobb.

Of course, since Lucy is involved……and there was a pie…….

bill-holden-cobb-salad2

Before Lucy – After Lucy

It was a few years later that I found out what was in a Cobb Salad….

brown-derby-cobb-salad

page from The Brown Derby Cookbook, probably the 1949 edition – here are several versions of the Brown Derby and it’s cookbooks

 

One way to remember the ingredients:

EAT COBB

Eggs + Avocado + Tomato   Chicken + Onion + Bacon + Blue Cheese

I recently had a Cobb Salad that was a variation on the theme. It was made with radicchio  instead of greens, which was a little too warming for a summer salad, but for an autumnal one…..Mmm Mmmm Good!

And it was chopped up nicely. Somewhere in the 21st century we’ve forgotten that salads are eaten with forks in public places and that they’re supposed to be ready to eat and not need more knife work.

This version also had roasted butternut squash and turkey instead of chicken and dried cranberries, a Plymouthy version.  Good, and got me thinking about a few more tweaks. I’d do chopped radicchio as the base, great color, nice change from  KALE (hasn’t the clock ticked past that by now????)

RadicchioNL

Anyhow – turkey instead of chicken – but a roasted turkey. A roasty flavor would help here. Maybe toss a turkey breast in while roasting the butternut squash.

butternutlarge_58e44083-ff75-4340-951a-eb4b357ecd3d

Now that the nights are cool – last night was downright COLD – a little “toss a sheet pan of something in the oven”  action is NOT out of the question., and if it helps to stave off another night of not turning the heat on…more power to that!

I might use fresh cranberries, once they once they come in, instead of dried. Blue cheese. Hard boiled eggs – easy. Bacon? No hardship there. I also have managed not to start a jar of bacon grease, so get a jar ready….I’m going to go with black olives as the O…..I just don’t like raw onion, and since it doesn’t like me right back, we’re even on that score.

What have a got so far?

Egg + A…….+ Turkey  Cranberry + Olive + Bacon + Blue Cheese

Hmmmm – What the A?

A stands for Apple!

this-is-not-an-apple-1964(1).jpg!Large

Rene Magritte 1964

If I make an Apple/Maple dressing, a little chopped apple will temper it, give the sweet to go with the rich/spicy/…apple cider vinegar, chopped apple, maple syrup and a touch of oil….

The temptation to ‘pumpkin spice’ this is nearly overwhelming, but I’ll try to resist.

September Salad – The Thanksgiving Cobb  –  check.

 

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Filed under Autumn, Eating, Lunch, New England, Thanksgiving

Christmastide

Now that we are at the Third Day of Christmas  – the Three French Hens Day

French hen Volailles_Bresse

Bresse Gauloise – notice the blue feet – “the queen of poultry, the poultry of kings”. They really ARE better then your average yard bird.

Crevecoeur_chicken

Crevecoeur

chickenHühner_(Geflügel-Album,_Jean_Bungartz,_1885)

Poule Houdan from Geflugel-Album of Jean Bungartz, 1885

Actually, I’m still so stuffed from Christmas Day, that although I was thinking of Sunday Chicken dinner, I might opt for a fruit salad of some sort. The part where it is 60º out and that is not what December usually feels like outside round about here might be throwing me off a little, too.

I do want some winter pears. The Boston Globe ran an article by Gordon Hamersley last week and he poached pears with a recipe from a cookbook that I also have – somewhere….

His was a gift from his mother-in-law; mine was a gift from my Uncle Bob.

700 yr of Eng cooking_

This book is not on the ‘time to move on’ booklist. It has a permanent place on my shelves.

I just realized that the partridge in a pear tree part of the song might be where my pear craving is coming from……

 

pear-tree-in-blossom-1888.jpg!Blog VAn Gogh

Pear Tree Van Gogh

 

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Chicken Once, Chicken Twice

Chicken Soup is Nice!

chickensoupsendakJan

Thank you, Maurice Sendak!

Chicken soup is also an easy (and cheap….I mean economical and low waste) way to have the same chicken twice. Feel free to eat as much of the meat as you’d like.

First – you need chicken with bones in it. Don’t eat the bones – they’re the part that’s needed for making the broth.

Easiest Chicken Broth EVAH

1 roasted chicken (it could even been the Friday special rotisserie chicken form the grocery store.)

some/all or none of the following:

a sad little carrot or 2

an onion – left whole, with maybe a clove or two in it. This could be a sad little excuse of an onion….

leafy tops from some celery or a limp (more sadness) stalk or two

parsley stems that you’ve carefully saved in the freezer from previous parsley events

a lemon ….in short, look in the corners of the fridge and find the sad, the limp, the forlorn, the orphaned and rinse them and toss them in the slowcooker.

water

salt and pepper

maybe a tablespoon or so of wine or vinegar if there is no lemon

  1. Rinse off the vegetative matter and put in the bottom of the slow cooker.
  2. Pick the meat off the bone of the chicken and put aside. Don’t worry – you don’t have to be too careful about this.
  3. Put the bones, the leftover skin, any of the jelly in the pan on top of the vegetable bits.
  4. Add 3-4 Quarts water, until the slow cooker is full and everything is under water.
  5. Add the vinegar or wine – this helps get all the goodness out of the bones. Depending on how the chicken was cooked originally add some salt and or pepper now.
  6. Cover and let cook 6-8 hours.
  7. Uncover, cool, strain and voila! Broth.
  8. Makes about 2 Quarts broth.

partly adapted from Italian Slow Cooker ….Italian slow cooker book

and years of lazy experience.

Now, if you don’t have a slow cooker, you can use a heavy bottom soup pot, bring it to a boil and keep it at a low simmer again, 6, 7, 8 hours and then strain, season, use.

And if you want to start with your own chicken, here’s Grandma B’s Chicken Soup with Dumplings

CHICKEN SOUP & DUMPLINGS

1 stewing hen & water to cover

1 large onion (whole)

Several outside stalks of celery-Tied

Salt and Pepper- (I use pepper corns 6 or 8)

  1. Cut up chicken place in soup POT – or leave whole
  2. Fill POT WITH WATER
  3. ADD whole onion & celery stalks
  4. Add 1 tsp salt for each 3# of chicken
  5. Add pepper corn
  6. Cook – until chicken is tender.

Take chicken out & debone – if desired

  1. You can add cut up carrots & celery.
  2. Add dumplings to boiling STOCK by teaspoon into soup.
  3. While dumplings cook – debone chicken to be returned to POT.

DUMPLINGS – Mother called them sinkers they are hard

5 eggs

½ C cream

1 tsp salt

Flour – stir in enough to make the dough really thick. Then add a couple Tbs of Top broth (2 or 3)

Drop into soup by a teaspoon – cook until they are cooked through.

  • from A Grandma B Recipe Card

    chick rubber

    A rubber chicken just won’t do – but any combination of bony chicken parts will.

 Bone Broth has been in the news lately – even the New York Times has had this  story. One of the people they quote  is Sally Fallon, who was advocating Bone Broth (and real fats!) years ago. I met  her at a conference/meeting of the Weston A. Price Society. I got a copy of Nourishing Traditions, which is a great primer for all sorts of truly natural and traditional foods. I had hoped to finally conquer yoghurt……

Nourishing Traditions Sally Fallon

This book was published in 2003, and I think it was fairly newly out when I was at the conference – which means it was over 10 years ago. How does time fly by like that? Still can’t make yoghurt.

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Salad Noodles

The salad days of summer continue……
Some people have signature dishes, something that they always bring, that they always serve.
I am not one of those people.
In part because, I have a very, very low threshold for boredom.
In part because there is very little I don’t truly believe that I could do better next time – and that means  little changes, and those little changes add up over time.
In part, because once I ‘file’ a recipe – out of sight, out of mind.
Going through my books and folders for this blog has been a real trip down memory lane.
In the ‘why did I stop making that’ category:

RAINBOW PEANUT NOODLES

It’s tasty, it’s easy, it travels well…..but once I put my copy of  the cookbook Asian Noodles  away…….when I picked it up, it fell open to the peanut dressing recipe.

Rainbow Peanut Noodles

 

Chinese Peanut Dressing

One 1/3 inch thick slice fresh ginger, peeled and cut in half

8 cloves garlic, peeled

1 teaspoon hot chile paste (or more…)

½ cup smooth peanut butter (or more…)

¼ cup soy sauce

3 ½ tablespoons sugar

3 1.2 tablespoons Chines black vinegar or Worcestershire sauce

3 tablespoons toasted sesame oil

2 tablespoons chicken broth or water (or more)

  1. In a blender or a food processor fitted with a metal blade, finely chop the ginger and the garlic.
  2. Add the remaining ingredients in the order listed. The dressing should be the consistency of thick cream. If it’s too thick, add more liquid; if it’s too think add more peanut butter.
  3. Refrigerate in a cover container (this is a good time to use a Mason jar). The dressing will keep for 2 to 3 weeks, she says – mine has never lasted past the 10 day mark.

Page 122.

Rainbow Noodle Salad

1 # thin noodles, cooked until just tender, rinsed under cold water, drained and tossed with 2 teas toasted sesame oil

8-10 carrots (2#) peeled and grated

4 good sized cukes, peeled, halved lengthwise, seeded, shredded and squeezed dry

4 cups bean sprouts, rinsed and drained

2 ripe bell peppers, cored, seeded and cut into thin strings (about 2 cups)

4 cups sliced cooked chicken, cut into thin strips (or the meat from a Friday night special supermarket  rotisserie chicken. Save the bones for broth)

2-3 tablespoons minced scallion greens (or garlic scapes)

  1. Arrange noodles in a large serving bowl or platter.
  2. Arrange vegetables in concentric circles over the noodles and pile the chicken in the center – or if there are vegetarians or food allergy issues, arrange the meat and veggies in smaller bowls/plates around the noodle bowl.
  3. Sprinkle the scallions or scapes all around on top.
  4. Serve at room temperature or chilled with the Chinese Peanut Sauce.

12 servings, depending on your crowd and what else is on the table.

Nina Simonds. Asian Noodles. Hearst Books. 1997. p.82.

Nina Simonds

Nina Simonds

Nina Simonds has a blog that has a tahini version of this sauce at ninasimonds.

Asian Noodles Nina SimmondsThe leftovers, should there be any, are great with eggs as a fritatta , just  leave off any cheese.

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Filed under Books, Recipe

Waffles for supper

Meatless M0nday – unless if when you hear waffles, chicken isn’t far behind.

Chicken and waffles is not meatless, but a great supper any day of the week

Chicken and waffles is not meatless, but a great supper any day of the week

In keeping with my resolution to reduce food waste, I had to come up with a way to use the buttermilk left over from the Irish bread baking of last week.

I once tried to cross reference my various recipes for just this sort of occasion…it was a hopeless muddle. I just wanted to group all the 1 cup of buttermilk recipes, all the 2 tablespoons of tomato paste recipes, all the…you get the picture.

But because I was reading Marion Cunningham, she neatly solved this buttermilk conundrum for me.

A waffle iron was one of the best small appliances I ever indulged myself in. I’ve actually worn out several. I don’t buy the high-end semi-industrial machine.

This waffle iron is a beaut - but at 200 bucks...I won't eat 200 dollars worth of waffles in my lifetime!

This waffle iron is a beaut – but at 200 bucks…I won’t eat 200 dollars worth of waffles in my lifetime!

I wait for a sale at Benny’s or Target, and get a perfectly respectable machine for under $30. It  has always served well for years. Now that I make waffles less often (read: New Years Day and maybe once or twice in the year, as opposed to maybe 25 or 30 times a year) my current waffle iron should last for decades.

Waffles also have an historic element – you knew I’d be working the food history angle in here eventually –

Waffles as good time food c. early 17th century:

This is a detail from a Pieter Bruegel painting about Carnevale. Notice the waffles as headgear!

This is a detail from a Pieter Bruegel painting about Carnevale. Notice the waffles as gambling booty and  headgear!

This is a 17th century waffle iron from France - It had to be heated over the fire. It's hard to tell from this photo, this might be a wafer iron, which are waffles super thin, extra rich cousins

This is a 17th century waffle iron from France – It had to be heated over the fire. It’s hard to tell from this photo, this might be a wafer iron, which are waffles super thin, extra rich cousins.

 

CORNMEAL WAFFLES

1 cup cornmeal

1 ¾ cups AP flour

2 ½ teaspoons baking powder

½ teaspoon baking soda

1 teaspoon salt

3 eggs, separated

2 ½ cups buttermilk

4 tablespoons of butter, melted

3 tablespoons of sugar

  1. Start heating the waffle iron.
  2. Whisk together the cornmeal, flour, baking powder, baking soda and salt until well blended.
  3. In a separate bowl, beat together the egg yolks. Add the buttermilk and butter to the egg yolks, blending well.
  4. Combine the liquid mixture with the flour mixture, mixing well.
  5. Beat the egg whites in a separate bowl until stiff, slowly adding the sugar.
  6. Fold in the beaten egg whites.
  7. Spoon ½ cup waffle batter in the hot greased waffle iron.
  8. Bake until golden. It will smell like popcorn.
  9. Enjoy!

Makes 6-8 waffles, depending on the size of your iron.

The Fannie Farmer Cookbook. Twelfth edition. Edited by Marion Cunningham with Jeri Laber. Alfred A. Knopf: New York. 1979.p. 500.

the-fannie-farmer-cookbook-57448l1

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Recipes, now and then

Andrew Zimmern

The recipe, which came in a Twitter update from the chef and television personality Andrew Zimmern, was succinct, as the form requires: “Brown 8 thighs, 3 C shallots. Add wine, tarragon, Dijon, sim 30 min covered. Remove lid, reduce. Add 2 C cut cherry toms.”

There was no photograph attached, but he was clearly writing about chicken. An image of the dish was instantly in my mind: the burnished brown of the skin peeking out of a sauce the color of goldenrod, with flecks of green from the tarragon and bright red from the wilted tomatoes. Such is the power of a great recipe in whatever form. The dish seemed obviously cookable. Better yet, it was deeply appetizing. I made it for the family right away.”

Sam Sifton, New York Times Magazine Chicken with Shallots, Chef Style March 19, 2014.

Sam Shifton also wrote a book on Thanksgiving

Sam Sifton also wrote a book on Thanksgiving, a great primer for the day’s cooking

Sifton goes on to say how he knows it’s chicken and how he cooks it and cooks it again, and that the twitter has the essence of the recipe.

Chicken, shallots,

Shallots

Shallots

tarragon

tarragon

tarragon

and cherry tomatoes

Cherry Tomatoes

Cherry Tomatoes

 

The photo to the NY Times

The photo to the NY Times article

Now, if Sifton didn’t know from chicken or tarragon or cherry tomatoes….this might not have been the image he  would have conjured up. But since he had an image and an impression of the dish, he knew how to cook it. So much of cooking is memory.

So much the same for cooks of the past. Just a few words could conjure up an image, and then they’d know what to do, if they even want to do this at all.

In the 17th century they didn’t have Twitter, but some of their recipes  are succinct enough for the form.  And the spelling is totally creative.

Parboyl them with beaten Parsley and Butter in their Bellies, then put them into your Boyler with strong Broth, add a blade of Mace, and some gross pepper, with half a pint of white-wine, grate a little bread into the broth to whitten the Fowl; and so serve them up with the Gravy and a dissolved Anchovy, Garnish’d with Parsly and Violets, or their leaves.

The Whole Duty of a Woman: Or a Guide to the Female Sex, 1696

This is a recipe for………

Pigeons or any small Fowl to Boyl.

It would work equally well with chicken.  Not too far from the the first recipe either – bird, wine, herb.

Violets are edible, as are their heart shaped leaves

Violets are edible, as are their heart shaped leaves

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Filed under Eating, Perception ways, Thanksgiving