Tag Archives: Cheese

Mrs. Wall’s Favorite ….

Muller’s Macaroni and Ham au Gratin

 

The Mrs. Wall in question is Nana Wall.

This is from a clipping of a vintage paper, with no date, but definitely Wayback….

 

Mrs. Wall’s Favorite Mueller’s Elbow Macaroni & Ham Au Gratin

½ of a 1 pound box of elbows

3 TBL butter

4 TBL chopped onion

2 TBS flour

¼ tsp salt

2 ½ Cups milk

1 C cooked ham, cut into strips

1 C grated American cheese

  1. Cook elbows.
  2. Sauté onion in butter, blend in flour, salt and milk. Stir until thick.
  3. Layer sauce with elbows, ham, and cheese in greased casserole dish.
  4. Bake at 375° for 25 minutes or until brown.

6 servings

From undated Mueller’s advertisement with Nana’s picture, also:

“Save $1.47 over average meal of meat, two vegetables for a family of four”

mueller elbow

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Filed under Recipe, Supper, Wicked Wayback

Comfort Food

What makes comfort food COMFORTING is that it’s big, and fast and easy and pulls no punches. And possibly takes you back to childhood, even one that wasn’t quite yours….so when someone from Minnesota mentioned missing Tator Tot Hotdish…..we were skeptics, but the Tater Tots….the tater tots…..so when she brought it in to share (this is a sharing dish), she had to write up the recipe.

tatertots

Tots, taters, potato goodness, potato rounds, potato puffs, tater puffs, Mexi-Fries

Here it is:

 

Minnesota Tator Tot Hotdish

1 lb. ground beef

1 medium onion, chopped

2 cans cream of mushroom or cream of chicken soup

14 or 16 oz bag of frozen vegetables (I use peas/corn/carrots/bean mix)

1 lb bag frozen tator tots

2 cups shredded cheese

Preheat oven to 350°

Brown beef and onion together on stove

Mix in the soup and vegetables

Spread mixture into a 9×13 pan

Arrange a layer of tots on top of mixture

Bake at 350° for about 45 minutes, or until tots are golden brown

Sprinkle cheese on top, and bake again until the cheese is melted and the mixture is bubbly

Erin Gillette, 2015

Want more hotdish the Minnesota way? Click here

hotdish

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Filed under Recipe, Supper, winter

Piece of Pie

Pizza Pie, that is.

Is there a point where pizza and pie are redundant?

Maybe the point would be at the point of the wedge…..

pizza slice

Piece of pizza – New York style slices

But then there is Pie Pie….

Pumpkin_Pie

Pumpkin Pie

SOOOOOOO,

When you have cooked squash/pumpkin and pizza dough both in your freezer at the same time and it’s also time to think of what’s for supper…….Time for Pumpkin Pizza Pie

Two Great Tastes that Taste Great Together!

 

PUMPKIN PIZZA PIE

2 rounds of pizza dough, rolled out to 10″

1/2  pound cooked squash

1 can Ro-Tell – drain it and drink the juice or save it for soup…

rotel

They were on sale last week – I was thinking of adding them into chili or soup

olive oil

grated  mozzarella or cheddar

grated Romano or Parmesan

  1. Put some oil in a pan. Add the drained Rotel, the squash and a clove or 2 (or 4) of garlic. Any finely diced veg or 2 would do well here now – pepper, onion, celery even a carrot. I had a roasted beet I didn’t think of til it was out of the oven…what a color THAT would have been!

  2. Cook to color, soften. Mash it down,nothing too big, too hard, too lumpy.

  3. Let the mixture cool a bit.

  4. Turn up the oven to 450-500°. Let it be hot.

  5. If you have a lump of cheese, shred it now. Shredded cheese was also on sale, and a name brand, not the store brand stuff. I bought it in spite of the chatter lately about wood pulp et al.in assorted cheese product. This one had potato starch, visible, all over the place potato starch, and plenty of it.  Next time I shred my own.  

  6. Sprinkle some grated Romano or Parmesan in a little circle in the middle. This is a trick I learned from Ian C. at a wood-fired oven workshop years ago.  It makes your first bite extra savory.This doesn’t work on pizzas that aren’t circles to be cut in wedges, although a little extra flavorful cheese underneath almost always works.  

  7. Divide the vegetable sauce between the 2 pizzas and spread across the dough.

  8. Sprinkle any fresh seasoning herbs may want now : fresh basil or fresh thyme. Sage, in very small amounts works with the squash. I had some fresh rosemary, and it only took a couple of pinches, minced fine.

  9. Top  with the shredded cheese. The cheese should not out weigh the rest of the topping….

  10. Put in a hot oven for 10 minutes and then check. It should be golden brown on top and bottom. If not, put it back in for a couple of more minutes – your oven will not be the same as mine! My oven took about 6 minutes more. If I wanted well-done pizza (don’t laugh, I know people who like things COOKED) keep  in in even a few minutes more. Don’t keep it in so long the Fire Department comes over to see what’s in the oven.

  11. Take out of the oven, cool for a minute or two (It helps the cheese set and keeps you from burning yourself). Cut in slices and serve. I froze my leftovers for another day (which was more then one other day, the last one of which was today).

  12. Glorious colors, tomato and pumpkin, two New World vine fruits together!

 

 

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Filed under Eating, Italian, Pantry, Pizza, Recipe, squash

Meatless Monday in Hurry

Sometimes….

like when it’s near , say, a holiday that has a major food component, time seems scarce…..only because it’s being filled up with the Everyday as well as the Holiday….and you suddenly realize that although the food for a certain day that is not today is planned, shopped and prepped, today, TODAY is a meal short.

Right NOW.

Do not be drawn to the arches of gold.MacD archesYou will not be lovin’ it.

You will add guilt and indigestion to an already full week.

INSTEAD do a really jiffy quick trip to the store to pick up a few pantry staples. Staples that can also be on hand for the later then last minute eats to take or serve, will also serve you. Soon.

Nachos.

This is the sort of glop that often passes for nachos. Do not be fooled - this is not nachos.

This is the sort of glop that often passes for nachos. Do not be fooled – this is not nachos. These are not nachos? Ponder the singular/ pleural conundrum that is nachos. Or not.

Nachos Now with Beans

8 ounces tortilla chips (you could make your own, which are zippy fast and really good, but this is not the time for that. Somebody’s hungry!)

1 pound shredded cheddar cheese (4 cups)   (The bag sort is fine here because of everything else going on)

2 large jalapeño chiles (3/4 ounce each), sliced thin (about 1/4 cup) (or a can of chopped green chiles, with jarred jalapeño slices on the side)

Refried beans, a can

2 scallions, sliced thin

1/2 cup sour cream (4 ounces) and/or an avocado or packaged guacamole

Jar of Paul Newman Salsa ( my favorites are Pineapple and Tequila Lime)

1 lime cut into 6 wedges

  1. Adjust oven rack to middle position and preheat oven to 400 °.
  2. Grate or shred the cheese if you bought a block and not a bag.
  3. Slice the jalapeno chiles and the scallions separately – tiny pieces!
  4. Spread half of chips in even layer in 13- by 9-inch baking dish
  5. Sprinkle evenly with 2 cups cheese and half of jalapeno slices.
  6. Drop about 6 oz of the re fried beans by spoonful across the cheesy landscape.
  7. Repeat with remaining chips, cheese, beans and jalapenos.
  8. Bake until cheese is melted, 7 to 10 minutes.
  9. Remove nachos from oven, cool 2 minutes, and then sprinkle with scallions.
  10. Along edge of nachos, drop scoops of sour cream, avocado, guacamole and salsa.
  11. Cut the lime into wedges.
  12. Serve immediately, passing lime wedges separately to squeeze on top.
  13. I have been know to make this in my little Pyrex baker for one…it breaks down. The trick is to not eat the chips alone. I look for unsalted chips or low salt. There’s plenty of taste in the cheese and the salsa and the jalapenos….

Adapted from Cook’s Illustrated July 2002

CI ja02_nachos_article

Nacho done right Cook’s Illustrated style – they make their own guac and salsa, which can be done speedily IF you have a good avocado and good tomatoes – it’s the shopping time the prepared stuff saves you. Everyone should a 15 minute meal or 2 up their sleeve. One that isn’t a bowl of cereal, that is.

CI jul02

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Filed under Christmas, Recipe

Beet it!

It’s a great time of year for beets, and by beets I mean red beetroot.

Central Italian School, 17th century

Central Italian School, 17th century. On closer inspection these ‘beets’ look more like turnips, but the little pan with the eggs….and that great big beautiful ham…and the cabbage, Oh, the cabbage..and the lovely little smoked mozzarella.

‘Turnip the Beet’ would be a great name for a rock band…..seems it’s not my most original thought today

 

 

Mint_2014-06-01_00-53

Mint – great time to pot some up to take indoors for the winter

But it’s also a great time for mint….actually it’s a great time for gardens in general. Warm days, cool nights, everything ready for the Harvest Moon on the 10th.harvest moon

Back to mint – so you have a few handfuls of mint, either because it’s chosen to grow everywhere you didn’t plant it or it’s doing just fine where you did plant it (you put it in a pot, didn’t you?) or they had really big bunches at the Farmer’s Market and they were practically giving it away? In any case, dry some for the winter (wash, shake, hang upside down out of direct sunlight but where there is good air circulation and when it’s dry, take it down and put it in a jar, either still on the stem or take the leaves off and use it all winter, because when the snow melts and the weather warms up, there will be more fresh.

Or you can make some mint vinegar.

Yes, you can.

Yes, YOU can.

Easy Peasey.

Mint Vinegar

1 pint wine vinegar, heated (save the bottle for the finished product)

1 pint clean fresh mint leaves

2 cloves

1 clove garlic, peeled

Crush the leaves slightly in your hands. Add clove and garlic and pour over the heated vinegar. Cover and let stand.

After 24 hours, remove the garlic clove.

Let stand 2 weeks.

After 2 weeks, strain and press though a cloth through a cloth. Discard the plant material. Bottle the vinegar and cover tightly. I use the same bottle the vinegar came in, and add a big MINT label to it. You can use other herbs the same way. Tarragon, for instance.

Irma Goodrich Mazza. Herbs in the Kitchen. Third edition, revised. Little Brown and Company.1939, 1947, 1975.

Herbs in the KitchenEven easier? Wash and dry the mint (say a cup, pack it in, it needs to be a little crushed, leaves no stems)  Put it in the bottom of a large clean jar. Top with vinegar, up to a quart. LABEL and set in the sun. After 2 week, if it smells good enough, strain through a coffee filter lined strainer and re bottle to use.

Minty Fresh Beet Salad

8 medium sized beets (2 inches diameter)
2 tablespoon raspberry vinegar (or any other fruit vinegar or apple cider vinegar or mint vinegar)
3 tablespoons oil, whatever you like on your salads
3 small very well mushed and minced garlic cloves (I love my garlic press)
½ teaspoon salt
¼ (packed) cup fresh coarsely chopped mint leaves
Optionals – this is the and/or list to make the salad:
½ cup crumbled feta cheese or ½ cup crumbled blue cheese or ¼ cup shaved Parmesan cheese….you see the pattern
½ cup or more plain Greek yoghurt
Leafy greens – lettuce, spinach, any sort of salad mix…..
4 hard boiled eggs, peeled and quartered
2 cups cold cooked white beans (more or less)
2 cups cold cooked macaroni (more or less)
1. Cook the beets. (If it’s not fresh beet season and you have a can, drain and rinse and proceed). Boil them or bake them until tender. Rub the skins off in cold running water.

2. Dry your now tender naked beets with a paper towel. Slice them in half the long way and cut them into very thin half moons. Put them in a bowl or a jar with a cover.
3. Mix together the dressing: the vinegar, oil, garlic, salt and mint. Pour over the beets and mix well.
4. Cover and let marinate for at least 12 hours. This will keep for up to a week….I usually manage 3 or 4 days…..
5. Salad time options:
a. Add cheese and serve.
b. Add Greek yoghurt and serve.
c. Serve over leafy greens, with or without dairy.
d. Top with quartered hard boiled eggs, with or without leafy greens
e. Add cooked white beans while marinating and serve with or without dairy, topped or not with hard boiled eggs over leafy greens or not…..
f. Mix with cold macaroni and Greek yoghurt over leafy greens and if there’s anything left, beat a couple of eggs, stir it all together and have a frittata, topped with whatever cheese you have on hand…
g. And pears – this goes really well with pears, especially pears and blue cheese….
Adapted and inspired from ‘Marinated Beets with Mint’ if Mollie Katan, Still Life with Menu 1988 Ten Speed Press. p. 57.

Still life with Menu

 

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Homemade Ricotta

This is seriously easy and exceptionally good.

For REAL, authentic in every detail ricotta, first you milk your cow…..

Woman milking a cow - Karel Dujardin - 1650 Dutch

Woman milking a cow – Karel Dujardin – 1650 Dutch

or your sheep or water buffalo OR you could got to your favorite market and pick up a gallon – whole milk, please, regardless of beast of origin.

Modern Day Milk Jug

Modern Day Milk Jug

What I’m going to suggest isn’t EXACTLY ricotta, but 1,000 times better then anything in a plastic carton

The particular brand is not important - if you ave a local dairy that is making fresh cheeses, you may stop here and then there. Otherwise, keep reading.

The particular brand is not important – if you have a local dairy that is making fresh cheeses, you may stop here and then go there. Otherwise, keep reading.

I’ve been working a lot with curds and whey lately, partly as part of my job and partly because it’s the fresh dairy time of year.

A small time out before I go any further.

RICOTTA MEANS ‘RE-COOKED’

IT IS A CHEESE MADE FROM WHEY LEFT OVER FROM CHEESE-MAKING.

First you have milk, then you add rennet,then you have curds and whey, then you take the whey and with THAT you make ricotta (at last!)

Like other whey cheeses, it is made by coagulating the keratin proteins that remain after the casein has been used to make cheese, notably albumin and globulin. Thus, ricotta can be eaten by persons with casein intolerance.

Thus speaketh Wikipedia, the most complete and least technical explanation I could find. In English. True ricotta is more complicated and involved than what I’m about to suggest.

Two simple truths:

  1. It is easy to curdle milk.
  2. Fresh is better then packaged, especially for dairy products.

Cook’s Illustrated to the rescue.

Because I keep back issues, and because I’ve been reviewing them, I rediscovered  simple, easy homemade ricotta.

Cook's Illustrated September 2009. Influencer

Cook’s Illustrated September 2009. Influencer

The reason I LOVE Cook’s Illustrated  and consider them an Influencer?

Things like this:

This technique will yield 3 1/2 cups of a superior-tasting ricotta facsimile (true ricotta is made from whey created as a by product  of cheese-making) that can be used in recipes from lasagna to manicotti to cheesecake and ricotta pie.

And if this isn’t a lasagna/manicotti/ricotta pie time of year, when is?

Homemade Ricotta

1 gallon whole milk

1 tsp salt

2 lemons, juiced,  for 1/3 cup lemon juice plus another tablespoon (1/3 c lemon juice = 5 Tablespoons plus 1 teaspoon. 2 lemons = approximately  6 T)  OR 1/3 cup white vinegar

2 lemons should give you enough juice for this ricotta - wash them first so you can use the zest after. Warm them for 10-20 seconds in the microwave before squeezing and you'll get more juice out.

2 lemons should give you enough juice for this ricotta – wash them first so you can use the zest after for something else. Warm them for 10-20 seconds in the microwave before squeezing and you’ll get more juice out.

thermometer (or trust your impeccably clean fingers )

cheesecloth (flour sack towels work even better, cost less and wash up more easily, if you’ve got them. If you’re going to be making cheeses at home, you’ll want some of these. K-Mart, Vermont Country Store – they’re everywhere)

Flour-sack towels - evidently they're quite the thing with the cloth baby diaper crowd...You can also use them to boil up a Christmas Pudding or two.....or dry a dish.

Flour-sack towels – evidently they’re quite the thing with the cloth baby diaper crowd…You can also use them to boil up a Christmas Pudding or two…..or dry a dish.

 

  1. Juice the lemons and put the juice aside.
  2. Heat the milk and salt to 185° over medium high heat in a heavy bottomed pan. If you’re doing this  Old-School and not using a thermometer, the milk should be at a simmer, not a boil and not still still. Use your impeccably clean finger, dip it in and the milk should be hot  – not warm, hot, but not boiling. Heating helps, boiling hinders.
  3. Remove from heat.
  4. Add the lemon juice, stir it in.
  5. Allow it to stand, undisturbed, for 5 minutes.
  6. Solid white curds should now be visible above  liquid translucent whey.
    Curds and whey - where's Miss Muffet?

    Curds and whey – where’s Miss Muffet?

     

  7.  IF it is not setting up, add another tablespoon of lemon juice, stirring gently and let stand for another 5 minutes.
  8. Once there are curds,gently scoop them up with a slotted spoon and place them in a cheesecloth lined colander (over a pot or a bowl or in the sink; there will be more whey dripping).

    If it's very drippy, hang it over the sink till it slows...but get it into the fridge before to very long long. This is food prep, not science experiment.

    If it’s very drippy, hang it over the sink till it slows…but get it into the fridge before to very long . This is food prep, not science experiment.

  9. DO NOT try to speed things up by dumping the whole pot of curds into the colander – the weight of the whey will destroy the beautiful, delicate curds, you’ll have a mess and be stuck with buying packaged ricotta.
  10. Drain without pressing (which will essentially give you paneer, a soft cheese that can be sliced) or squeezing. Let drain overnight in the fridge over a bowl (do I really have to say that out loud? Since I’m the one not always good with The Obvious….at least for one)

    Ricotta draining baskets - you could invest or you could improvise....

    Ricotta draining baskets – you could invest or you could improvise….

  11.  Keep refrigerated and use within five days.
  12. Makes about 3 1/2 cups of ricotta.

 adapted from Cook’s Illustrated, September/October  2009, p. 31.

 

Go to University of Cincinnati Clermont College ricotta making site for Real Ricotta .

 

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Filed under Holiday, Influencers, Recipe

Irish Mac and Cheese

Macaroni is not the least bit Irish. Calling it Mac only makes it sound like it is.

But if  you are Irish and Catholic,  St. Patrick’s Day comes smack dab in the middle of Lent and if it’s on a Friday night , no less, even if you are in the Archdioceses of Boston and even if St Patrick is the Patron saint of the Archdiocese  and even if there is dispensation for corned beef and cabbage……you might very well be having macaroni and cheese for supper.

st patrick

St Patrick, chasing  snakes and green macaroni and cheese out of Ireland

I don’t remember the details. We had plenty of St Patrick’s Days with Corned Beef and Cabbage but this one was most notably not one of those.  Was my Irish father working late? He loved his corned beef and cabbage, especially if corned beef would lead to corned beef hash….

Was it a year without dispensation? What year was it, anyhow?

What I remember was

  1. it was St. Patrick’s Day
  2. We were going to have macaroni and cheese and not corned beef.
  3. There wasn’t quite enough elbow macaroni, so some spaghetti was broken up into the mix.
  4. My mother decided to make the meal more festive by adding a little green food color to the cheese sauce.
green food color

Things are not necessarily more Irish if you color them green

How did it turn out?  It was not beautiful. Let me say that again ” ‘s NOT” Beautiful.

There are no photos. Saint Patrick’s gift to the world.

I have been highly skeeved by green food for Saint Patrick ever since. I’m not sure how this is supposed to honor the saint or Ireland.  Just say NO.

Someone else made green macaroni and cheese and took a picture of it and put it on the internet. Imagine a creamier, greener sauce...

Someone else made green macaroni and cheese and took a picture of it and put it on the internet. Imagine a creamier, greener sauce…

Green does not make the beer Irish

Green does not make the beer Irish

Green pancakes? No thank you

Rice Krispie Treats? Thank you, no.

Why??????

Why??????

Green eggs and ham

I just avoid green eggs and ham in March

I even avoid green beans at this time of year

I even avoid green beans at this time of year

Éirinn go Brách

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Filed under Holiday, Irish

How To Make A Cheese Sauce In 40 Seconds

This is not just ANY cheese sauce – A RICH cheese sauce in 40 seconds. This is the promise of the Waring Cook Book for the 8 Button Blender. 1967.

Waring Cook Book

Waring Cook Book

It begins with a “Short Course in Blender Cooking” that includes the advice

“You own an electric blender….USE IT EVERY DAY!’

They’re also terribly fond of all caps, never realizing that ONE DAY it will look like they’re SHOUTING.

The second section is 30 ways to use your blender every day, the first way being

1.   Whip Cream.

I would like to pause for a moment and contemplate the place where whipped cream is an everyday thing……..

whipped creamor even this kind of whipped cream

HA_WhippedCreamBack to blenders…..

waring blender

This is the 8 button model, but I’m pretty sure ours wasn’t white. On the other hand, it wasn’t the first blender and it certainly wasn’t the last…

Blenders have come and gone, but this little cookbook has remained. I had to promise that my time with it is a LOAN agreement, and that it must return to the ancestral home and take it’s rightful place next to Betty Crocker, the 1957 Better Homes and Gardens and the Church cookbook (which I’ll be borrowing next).

But a quick and easy cheese sauce for mac and cheese…which takes slightly longer then 40 seconds to make, especially if you need 2 batches to feed everyone around the table.

It also calls for only one sort of cheese – cheddar –  and cheddar is great – we often had Cracker Barrel cheddar in the house

Cracker Barrel cheese has a Facebook page...I can't make this stuff up

Cracker Barrel cheese has a Facebook page…I can’t make this stuff up

but we usually we used several different sorts of cheeses in the sauce, one of them being Velveeta. velveeta box

 Rich Cheese Saucemakes 3 cups

2 tablespoons soft butter or margarine

2 tablespoons flour

½ teaspoon salt (I add the salt after the cheese is blended in because the salt level of  cheese varies so much)

1/8 teaspoon pepper

2 cups scalding milk

1 ½ cups diced Cheddar cheese (Don’t be afraid to mix this up – great way to use up bits)

  1. Put all the ingredients – except the cheese – into the blender.

  2. Cover.

  3. Press WHIP and when blades reach full speed, press Blend. Blend 20 seconds.

  4. With motor on, remove cover (I feel the need to tell you to be VERY careful – hot milk inside, please don’t let it get outside all over you) gradually add cheese.

  5. Blend 20 seconds longer.

  6. Pour into a sauce pan and cook 3 minutes, stirring occasionally OR

  7. Mix with 8 ounces elbow macaroni, cooked, in a 2 quart baking dish and bake in a 350°F oven for 30 minutes.

maccheese

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Filed under Books, Recipe, The 1960"s

Pizza on a Roll

not exactly – WAY too many carbs…but since the pizza topic is far from exhausted, another pizza from my past.

But first – when is a pizza not a pizza? What is the essential pizzaness of the pizza?

What about this pizza from Papa Gino’s menu :

  • Buffalo Chicken Mac & Cheese Buffalo Chicken Mac & Cheese Spicy buffalo chicken and macaroni in a creamy cheese sauce with a blend of American, asiago, and sharp cheddar cheese, topped with crispy breadcrumbs.

Is the combination of buffalo chicken AND mac AND cheese take it beyond pizza, or is it defined by the crust and the pan? I just heard about this for the very first time this month, and I just don’t know.

What about this pizza from Brazil ? :

Chocolate Pizza from Brazil

Chocolate Pizza from Brazil

Continue pondering…….

There is another reason I connect pizza and Christmas. According to Wikipedia (I know, keep reading):

The term ‘pizza’ first appeared “in a Latin text from the southern Italian town of Gaeta in 997 AD, which claims that a tenant of certain property is to give the bishop of Gaeta ‘duodecim pizze’ [‘twelve pizzas’] every Christmas Day, and another twelve every Easter Sunday”

(Salvatore Riciniello (1987) Codice Diplomatico Gaetano, Vol. I, La Poligrafica)

And where was my mother born? Gaeta.

I should definitely revive the 12  pizza thing. Next year. Someone remind me. BTW, there are both Pizza and History of Pizza entries in Wiki and they should probably spend a little more time together.

A little more general history , on pizza and Pizza Margharita, the pizza that carries the colors of the Italian flag in the red tomato, the white mozzarella and the green basil. On second thought, since this leads right into the story of the pizza napoletana, the European Union and legislation (Hooper, John (9 December 2009). “Pizza napoletana awarded special status by EU”. The Guardian. Retrieved 9 December 2009.) this is proabably a story for another day.

Pizza Margherita

Pizza Margherita

So if the Pasta di Pizza (that would be the dough that makes the crust) has no yeast in it, but is leavened with baking powder, is it still a pizza? asks the girl who has made (and eaten) English muffin pizza, toaster pizza, pizza roll-ups (at least I think that’s what they were called – or were they pizza bites?) Here they are…..

Cresent rollup - 1982 Pillsbury Bake Off winner

Crescent Pizza  roll-ups – 1982 Pillsbury Bake Off winner!

So here’s a recipe for Quick Pizza – and it is made in a jiffy, with ingredients that I generally had on hand.

Quick pizza

2 C flour + ½ cup ww (although I generally use half and half flour)

1 ½ teaspoons Baking Power – not be confused with baking soda, which is for Irish bread and not Italian Pizza

½ teaspoon salt

4 TBL butter

1 cup milk

toppings

  1. Heat the oven to 450. Prepare 2 cookie sheets – parchment paper, silpat or well greased.
  2. Mix the flours together with the baking powder and the salt.
  3. Cut in (or rub in – it’s rather like biscuit here) the butter.
  4. Add the milk and form into a dough ball.
  5. Cut the dough into 4 equal parts and shape into 8″ rounds (or other shapes to fit your  sheets or your plates or your moods)
  6. Put on your toppings.
  7. Bake for 12-15 minutes or until golden on the bottom and melty to brown on top.

from Jeanne Lemlin. Main Course Vegetation Pleasure . HarperPerennial. 1995 (June 1995). P. 134. She also wrote  Quick Vegetarian Pleasures and Simple Vegetarian Pleasures.

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Filed under Christmas, Pizza, Recipe