Tag Archives: Bakewell cream

Biscuits -Buttermilk and Bakewell

Back in the long ago olden days – the ’80’s – I pretty much cooked my through the McCalls Cooking School binders.

Mcalls CS bindersIn 1986 I copied out the recipe for Old Fashioned Buttermilk Biscuits , which on their flip side  went by the alias

“Southern Raised Biscuits”

1 cup buttermilk

4 cups AP flour

2 teaspoons baking powder

1 tsp salt

1 pkg active dry yeast

1/2 cup warm water

2 Tbl sugar

1/3 cup shortening (I now use butter)

2 Tbl butter, melted

  1. Heat the buttermilk in a small pan until bubbles form around the edges – it will curdle. Cool to lukewarm

  2. Grease 2 large cookie sheets

  3. Sift the flour with the baking powder and salt into a large bowl.

  4. Sprinkle the yeast over the warm water in a small bowl. Add he sugar and stir to dissolve completely. Stir this into the lukewarm buttermilk.

  5. Cut the shortening into he flour with a pastry blender or 2 knives until mixture resembles course corn meal.

  6. Make a well in the center and add the buttermilk mixture all at once. Stir in with a fork to mix well.

  7. Dough will be stiff. Turn out to floured board and knead until smooth – about 5 minutes.

  8. Using a rolling pin, roll our from the center to 1/2 thickness.  With floured cutter (or sharp knife) cut into 2″ biscuits (I like square ones).

  9. Place biscuits on prepared cookie sheet 1 inch apart.

  10. Prick the tops with a fork  1,2, 3 .

  11. Cover them with a towel and let them rise about 1/2 an hour., until their about 1 ” high

  12. Preheat the oven to 400°

  13. Before baking brush tops with melted butter

  14. Bake biscuits 10-12 minutes or until golden brown.

  15. Serve warm, with butter and honey…..makes about 30 biscuits.

McCalls Cooking School Old Fashioned Buttermilk Biscuits Breads4.

These are not the only biscuits….my favorite quick and easy biscuit is made with Bakewell Cream.

bakewell cream imageWhat is Bakewell Cream?

Bakewell Cream is a variety of baking powder developed by Bangor, Maine chemist Byron H. Smith in response to a shortage of cream of tartar in the U.S. during World War II. It is sold throughout the U.S., but is most popular in the state of Maine.

It sure does make a nice biscuit. But buying a can is now a commitment to biscuits – I’d hate to have throw any away. It’s available through King Arthur Flour, but I’ve also picked it up in the baking section of my local Stop & Shop.

Bakewell Cream Biscuits

4 c. flour
4 tsp. Bakewell Cream
2 tsp. soda
1 tsp. salt
1/2 c. shortening ( I use butter)
1 1/2 c. milk
  1. Preheat oven to 475°.
  2. Light grease 2 cookie sheets (or use parchment)
  3. Mix together with a whisk the flour, Bakewell Cream, baking soda, and salt.
  4. Cut in with a pastry blender or 2 knives the shortening or butter until it resembles cornmeal
  5. Add in the milk to a well in the center all at once.and mix together with a fork. You really want to combine the ingredients, you don’t want to really mix and create lots of gluten strands. Light biscuits have undeveloped gluten! Mixing makes biscuits tough.
  6. Pat out to a floured board. With a rolling pin, start in the center and roll outward so that it’s 1/2 inch thick.
  7. Cut biscuits with floured cutter or a sharp knife – I like square biscuits, no re-rolling scraps.
  8. Put about 1 inch apart on the cookie sheets.
  9. Put the biscuits in the hot oven and turn the timer on for 5 minutes.
  10. At the 5 minute mark turn off the oven and leave the biscuits in for another 5-10 minutes until golden and lovely.
  11. Serve hot with butter and honey.

ALSO – You can freeze the unbaked biscuits you might not be using right away….mix, shape and freeze. Bake them from the frozen state, 8 minutes instead of 5.

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Filed under Recipe, The 1980's

STOP – Drop, don’t roll

Biscuits, that is.

Stop Drop and Roll is still great advice near a FIRE, but biscuits are less intimidating and are quicker and easier if you make drop biscuits instead of cut kind.

pillsbury biscuit

Easy. Quick. Smell great in the oven. Eaten so fast, often with butter or honey, that you don’t notice the taste is lacking. It’s the chemical aftertaste that reminds you you have other options.

Drop biscuits move you past the biscuit perfection issues  and into the wide world of biscuit much more gently.  Instead of rolling the biscuits, which then need to be cut , you make the dough  a little more like batter and drop it by spoonfuls – or scoopfuls – onto the baking sheet and just pop it into a preheated oven. Having the oven good and hot is one way to make a better biscuit.

Parmesan Drop Biscuits

2 cups AP flour

Grated Parmesan cheese

bakewell cream

It really does make the biscuits higher and lighter – heavenly

1 Tablespoon double acting baking powder (or Bakewell Cream, my fave)

½ teaspoon salt

½ stick butter (1/4 cup)

1 cup of milk

  1. Sift the flour into a mixing bowl with the baking powder and salt.
  2. Mix in the grated cheese
  3. Using your finger OR 2 knives OR a heavy fork OR a biscuit mixer (ill)blend the flour and butter together into fine particles
  4. Add the milk and stir the dough just enough to gather it all together. Don’t over mix at this point or you’ll get tough, rugged, more like hockey pucks than biscuits, biscuits.
  5. Drop by spoonfuls on an ungreased cookie sheet.
  6. Bake in a preheated 450° oven for 12-15 minutes
  7. Serve hot
  8. Makes about 12 biscuits.

 

James Beard. Beard On Bread. p. 160-1.beard on bread

 

Easy-peasy.

stop sign drop

for when it’s not about biscuits

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Filed under Autumn, Bread, Recipe, The 1980's