Tag Archives: 17th century

First, Bolonia Sausages

 

Welcome to another Wicked WayBack Wednesday.

For years, and years, and even more years, when I saw the words

Bolonia Sausages

which are fairly common words in 2nd half 17th century English cookbooks, I thought

Bologna

OM bologina

You know, like Oscar Mayer. Click Oscar Mayer, it’s the link to the song

oscar_mayer_kid

And then one day I realized it was

Baloney.

Baloney, like  I was wrong.

Really wrong.

Wrong way, really and truly wrong.

Wrong country wrong.

Darn those 17th century English dialects.

Not Bolonia but Polonia. Not Italian sausage – Polish sausage.

oscar-mayer-kielbasa-polska-85001

Oscar Mayer kielbasa polska

A smoked Polish sausage…..like kielbasa

First, Bolonia Sausages.

The best way and time of the year is to make them in September.

Take four stone of pork, of the legs the leanest, and take away all
the skins, sinews, and fat from it; mince it fine and stamp it: then
add to it three ounces of whole pepper, two ounces of pepper more
grosly cracked or beaten, whole cloves an ounce, nutmegs an ounce
finely beaten, salt, spanish, or peter-salt, an ounce of
coriander-seed finely beaten, or carraway-seed, cinamon an ounce
fine beaten, lard cut an inch long, as big as your little finger,
and clean without rust; mingle all the foresaid together; and fill
beef guts as full as you can possibly, and as the wind gathers in
the gut, prick them with a pin, and shake them well down with your
hands; for if they be not well filled, they will be rusty.

These aforesaid Bolonia Sausages are most excellent of pork only:
but some use buttock beef, with pork, half one and as much of the
other. Beef and pork are very good.

Some do use pork of a weeks powder for this use beforesaid, and no
more salt at all.
Some put a little sack in the beating of these sausages, and put in
place of coriander-seed, carraway-seed.

This is the most excellent way to make Bolonia Sausages, being
carefully filled, and tied fast with a packthred, and smoaked or
smothered three or four days, that will turn them red; then hang
them in some cool cellar or higher room to take the air.

Robert May The Accomplist Cook

Robert May and the frontispiece of The Acomplist Cook

Robert May and the frontispiece of The Acomplist Cook

If you’ve made sausages before, you can see that this is actually a pretty good sausage recipe. A stone is 14 pounds so 4 stone is a LOT of meat. 56 pounds of meat. 17th century sausage making is not for those with dainty appetites. 20-30% fat. Water and spices. Good advice to get rid of the air pockets. This is not a starter recipe.  Smoking is easy if you have a smoker or know someone who has a smoker.

Either way, sausages in September seem completely more Autumn then sausages in August. The cold nights are only the coming attractions for the season ahead. It’s still not Fall, so all those Pumpkin Spiced  Lattes and doughnuts – not quite yet, thank you very much.

pumpkin spice lattes

All in due time.

some-e-cards-pumpkin-640x420

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Filed under Recipe, The 17th century

Month of May

Robert May, that is.

RobertMayTheAccomplishtCookFrontispieceI somehow thought that I could write about food and not write about the 17th century….not true. The 17th century kitchen spends too much time in my brain for me to ignore.

Since I spend many of my waking hours in 1627…..dressed in a burlap suit doing menial labor, as it were, and get paid to play with fire….Wednesdays will have a Wicked-WayBack feature. Take that Throwback Thursdays!

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Robert May’s bill of fare for the month of May:

A Bill of Fare for May.

1 Scotch Pottage or Skink.
2 Scotch collops of mutton
3 A Loin of Veal.
4 An oline, or a Pallat pye.
5 Three Capons, 1 larded.
6 Custards.

A Second Course.

1 Lamb.
2 A Tart Royal, or Quince Pye
3 A Gammon of Bacon Pie.
4 A Jole of Sturgeon.
5 Artichock Pie hot.
6 Bolonia Sausage.
Tansies.

To make a Tansie the best way.

Take twenty eggs, and take away five whites, strain them with a
quart of good thick sweet cream, and put to it grated nutmeg, a race
of ginger grated, as much cinamon beaten fine, and a penny white
loaf grated also, mix them all together with a little salt, then
stamp some green wheat with some tansie herbs, strain it into the
cream and eggs, and stir all together; then take a clean frying-pan,
and a quarter of a pound of butter, melt it, and put in the tansie,
and stir it continually over the fire with a slice, ladle, or
saucer, chop it, and break it as it thickens, and being well
incorporated put it out of the pan into a dish, and chop it very
fine; then make the frying pan very clean, and put in some more
butter, melt it, and fry it whole or in spoonfuls; being finely
fried on both sides, dish it up, and sprinkle it with rose-vinegar,
grape-verjuyce, elder-vinegar, couslip-vinegar, or the juyce of
three or four oranges, and strew on good store of fine sugar.

Otherways.

Take a little tansie, featherfew, parsley, and violets stamp and
strain them with eight or ten eggs and salt, fry them in sweet
butter, and serve them on a plate and dish with some sugar.

Tansy the best way is a whole lotta tansy…..but otherways, take 8 eggs, beat them;  a handful of parsley and put it in an old dishtowel and squeeze the juice out of it and add it to the eggs. Add some salt. Fry it up in butter. Slide it out onto a dish and flip it back in to cook both sides.

Sprinkle a little sugar on top and serve,either hot or at room temp.

17th century cooking ion a 21st century kitchen.

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Filed under Books, Influencers, The 17th century