Category Archives: Wicked Wayback

Possets, Fools & Trifles

OR

How to eat Cream and Sugar before Ice Cream was part of  Summer  – or any other Season

Possets:

Using lemon or lime to curdle cream, which is like custard without the fuss – or egg.

Bon Apetit July 2017  which is “Posset” in the magazine – BUT

“Egg-less custard” on the web site.

They’ve been around since the 16th and 17th century, and are cousins of  syllabubs. Some are made with wine, which make them milkshakes for grown-ups.

posset cup silver

Darling little two handled posset cup. The heading image is a posset cup with a spout.

But here’s the link: http://www.bonappetit.com/recipe/eggless-lime-custards-with-lychees

And some 17th century recipes….

To make a Compound Posset of Sack, Claret, White-Wine, Ale, Beer, or Juyce of Oranges, &c.

Take twenty yolks of eggs with a little cream, strain them, and set them by; then have a clean scowred skillet, and put into it a pottle of good sweet cream, and a good quantity of whole cinamon, set it a boiling on a soft charcoal fire, and stir it continually; the cream having a good taste of the cinamon, put in the strained eggs and cream into your skillet, stir them together, and give them a warm, then have some sack in a deep bason or posset-pot, good store of fine sugar, and some sliced 425 nutmeg; the sack and sugar being warm, take out the cinamon, and pour your eggs and cream very high in to the bason, that it may spatter in it, then strow on loaf sugar.

To make a Posset simple.

Boil your milk in a clean scowred skillet, and when it boils take it off, and warm in the pot, bowl, or bason some sack, claret, beer, ale, or juyce of orange; pour it into the drink, but let not your milk be too hot, for it will make the curd hard, then sugar it.

Otherways.

Beat a good quantity of sorrel, and strain it with any of the foresaid liquors, or simply of it self, then boil some milk in a clean scowred skillet, being boil’d, take it off and let it cool, then put it to your drink, but not too hot, for it will make the curd tuff.

Possets of Herbs otherways.

Take a fair scowred skillet, put in some milk into it, and some rosemary, the rosemary being well boil’d in it, take it out and have some ale or beer in a pot, put to it the milk and sugar, (or none.)

Robert May. The Accomplist Cook. Accomplist Cook

No need for specialty serving ware.

But seriously – if you have an Iced Tea Spoon, why Not a Posset Pot?

As for Fools:

 

 

AN ORANGE FOOL

Take the juice of six Oranges and six Eggs well beaten, a Pint of Cream, a quarter of a Pound of Sugar, a little Cinnamon and Nutmeg; mix all together, and keep stirring over a slow Fire, till it is thick, then put in a little Piece of Butter, and keep stirring till cold, then dish it up.

  • Glasse, Hannah. The Art of Cookery, made Plain and Easy. 1747. Prospect Books ed. 1995, p. 79.

Glasse - First catch

But since

Orange Fool

aired on the Fourth of July, some thought it was…

political, not food at all.

SO this:

There are other fools….

Robert May again:

To make a Norfolk Fool.
Take a quart of good thick sweet cream, and set it a boiling in a clean scoured skillet, with some large mace and whole cinamon; then having boil’d a warm or two take the yolks of five or six eggs dissolved and put to it, being taken from the fire, then take out the cinamon and mace; the cream being pretty thick, slice a fine manchet into thin slices, as much as will cover the bottom of the dish, pour on the cream on them, and more bread, some two or three times till the dish be full, then trim the dish side with fine carved sippets, and stick it with slic’t dates, scrape on sugar, and cast on red and white biskets.

Which leaves

TRIFLES

To make a Trifle.
Take a pinte of thicke Creame, and season it with Suger and Ginger, and
Rosewater, so stirre it as you would then haue it, and make it luke warme in a dish
on a Chafingdishe and coales, and after put it into a siluer peece or a bowle, and so serue it to the boorde.

The_Good_Huswifes_Jewell_Frontispiece_1610(1)

 

Section XII.

To make all manner of Creams, Sack-Possets, Sillabubs, Blamangers, White-Pots, Fools, Wassels, &c.

To make a Triffel.

Take a quart of the best and thickest cream, set it on the fire in a clean skillet, and put to it whole mace, cinamon, and sugar, boil it well in the cream before you put in the sugar; then your cream being well boiled, pour it into a fine silver piece or dish, and take out the spices, let it cool till it be no more than blood-warm, then put in a spoonful of good runnet, and set it well together being cold scrape sugar on it, and trim the dish sides finely.

RobertMayTheAccomplishtCookFrontispiece

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Slump

Grunt, Buckler, Crisp and Crumble. Add some Cobblers and Pan-dowdies. Betties. We mustn’t leave out the Betties. These are the Goldie-Oldies of the fruit and butter and flour, baked in a dish but not quite a pie, classic New England treats.

These ‘Olde-Thymie’ treats just aren’t as oldie as they like to pass themselves off as. But, since they’re now nearing their centennial….well, I guess they’re old at last!

Welcome to the Colonial Revival! When the New Fashion was to be old-fashioned even though you’re new…..Old Days Old Ways the way they never were…rather like the Bi-Centennial…..we just never stop reinventing the past.

Orchard_House_1941_-_HABS_-_cropped

Orchard House circa 1940.  Home of Louisa  May Alcott in Concord MA – this is where she wrote Little Women. She nicknamed the house “Apple Slump”.

I can’t remember not knowing cobblers, and crisps and crumbles…..and knowing there was some extensional difference between them even if I couldn’t articulate it.But I remember quite clearly when I first heard about  Apple Slump – The summer between third and fourth grade.

The Christmas before Aunt Eileen (Grampy’s only  sister) had given me several brown paper bags FULL of books. She felt it was important to have books on hand, before you thought you could be ready for them, lined up and ready for you when you were ready for them. Chapter books. Book with more words then picture books. And one of them was :

LW

And – I’d seen the movie! Twice!

Little_Women_1933_lobby_card

The Katherine Hepburn one….

and

 

LW1949

the 1949 version with June Allyson

I’ve since seen the 1994 – of course!

Little_women_poster

Hello Winona and Susan Sarandon

Anyhow, I must have looked Louisa May Alcott up in the encyclopedia…that’s a big set of books we used to go to to find stuff out before the internet…..and found out that she called her house Apple Slump.Actually, the house was named Orchard House – Apple Slump was it’s nickname. A house with a pet name!

The first food  Apple Slump reference is in a Salem MA newspaper 2 years before Louisa’s birth

20 November 1830, Salem (MA) Observer, pg. 2, col. 3:
The pumpkin pies and apple slump, bacon and plum-pudding, were smoking on the table, when the old gentleman, gathering round him his smiling guests, said grace in the following manner: “May God bless us, and what is provided for us.”

The Big Apple

Louisa_May_Alcott_headshot

Louisa May Alcott

And LMA left a recipe for Apple Slump –

Slump
Pare, core and slice 6 apples and combine with one c(up). sugar, 1 t(easpoon) cinnamon, and 1/2 c. water in a saucepan. Cover and beat to boiling point. Meanwhile sift together 1 1/2 c. flour, t t/4 t. salt and 1 1/2 t. baking powder and add 1/2 cup milk to make a soft dough. Drop pieces of the dough from a tablespoon onto apple mixture, cover, and cook over low heat for 30 min. Serve with cream.”
John F. Mariani. Encyclopedia of American Food and Drink, (p. 297)

http://www.foodtimeline.org/foodpies.html#slump

 

And then there’s pandowdies….

 

 

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PopCorn!

Just a little more…having found one

popcorn macroon allrecipes2017

and then another…..

I found a third

popcorn macaroon recipe

So I’m sharing.

 

Pop Corn Macaroons

        Mix half a cupful of popped and rolled corn (Nelson’s is the best). And half a package of chopped raisins, one cupful of powdered sugar, the whites of two eggs and a tablespoon of flour together and drop on greased brown paper by the tablespoonsful and bake in a moderate oven until light brown.

  • Talbott, Mary Hamilton. Pop Corn Recipes. Grinnell, Iowa: Sam Nelson, Jr., Company, 1916. n.p. in In Andy Smith’s Popped Culture, University of South Carolina Press, 1999. p. 200.

popcornrecipes00talb_0017

popcornrecipes00talb_cover

Popped Culture

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Fourth of July Menu, Early 20th Century

The 45 star flag of 1901.(banner)

WhiteHouseCookBook001

The White House Cook Book was first released in 1894, and was updated regularly.

TO THE

WIVES OF OUR PRESIDENTS,

THOSE NOBLE WOMEN WHO HAVE GRACED THE

WHITE HOUSE

DEAR TO ALL AMERICANS,

THIS VOLUME

IS AFFECTIONATELY DEDICATED

BY THE AUTHOR.

In between the recipes and household hints there are portraits of the first ladies…..all of them up to 1900 in this 1901 edition.

There are also menus for the whole  year, of breakfast, dinner, and supper suggestions for each day of a week for each month of the year, as well as special whole day holiday menus.

New Year’s Day has a menu, as does Washington’s Birthday (which includes Washington Pie for dinner, but also English Pound Cake for supper…)

July begins with a

TR flag 1901

FOURTH OF JULY.

BREAKFAST.

Red Raspberries and Cream

Fried Chicken 86.   Scrambled Tomatoes 196.

Warmed Potatoes 186.     Tennessee Muffins 245.

Toast 268.

Coffee 487.

DINNER.

Clam Soup 46.

Boiled Cod 68., with Lobster Sauce 150.

Roast Lamb 136. With Mint Sauce 152.

New Potatoes Boiled 183.

Green Peas 201.    Spinach with Eggs 202.

Cucumbers Sliced 167

Chicken Patties 85

Naple Biscuits 343.  Vanilla Ice-cream 357.

Chocolate Macaroons 358.   Strawberries.

Coffee 437.

 

SUPPER.

Cold Sliced Lamb 134.

Crab Pie 69. Water-cress Salad 168. Cheese Toast 264.

Graham Bread 234.  Sponge Cake 277.

Blackberries. Tea 439.

 

p. 468 White House CB

I was interested to see Green Peas and New Potatoes for the Fourth, as well as Boiled Cod with Lobster Sauce, even though it’s not quite Poached Salmon and Egg Sauce…..

But wait –

are those

MACAROONS

for dessert at dinner?????

Macaroons again? You spend some time with a recipes, and it turns up EVERYWHERE

Although this time in chocolate….

Chocolate Macaroons

PUT three ounces of plain chocolate in a pan and melt on a slow fire; then work it to a thick paste with one pound of powdered sugar and the whites of three eggs; roll the mixture down to the thickness of about one-quarter of an inch; cut it in small, round pieces with a paste-cutter, either plain or scalloped; butter a pan slightly, and dust it with flour and sugar in equal quantities; place in it the pieces of paste or mixture, and bake in a hot but not too quick oven.

  1. Ziemann, Hugo and Mrs. F. L. Gillette. The White House Cook Book. The Saalfield Publishing Co.: New York-Akron-Chicago. p. 353.

45starflag

Can you name the five states that joined the Union in the 20th century?

Talk amongst yourselves…..

Happy Fourth!

 

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Macaroons and Popcorn

I’m just back from Rochester New York, where ALHFAM was this year.

ALHFAM is Association of Living History Farms and Museums so this was a professional development trip .

There was a whole lot of foods of the past in the program.

macaroons 2017

A Short, Sweet History of Macaroons  presented by Mya Sangster was very sweet indeed.

Mya made samples …A little bag with labeled cookies  so you could eat along with the recipes….

And then another lot up front, all the variations from a single recipe that called for

Almond, walnut, ground nut (peanut) cob nut (hazel or filbert) and coconut

Peanut macaroons are a marvelous and wonderful thing.

Somewhere I have the handout that has the recipes.

May 31st is National Macaroon Day, so I have time to get my act together before the next big celebration.

But I keep finding miscellaneous macaroons in my ordinary reading …like this:

The Sunflower:

I once made macaroons with the ripe blanch’d seeds, but the turpentine did so domineer over all, that it did not answer expectations.”

               Evelyn, John. A Discourse of Sallets. (1699)Prospect Books. 2005. p. 45.

So, Sunflower Macaroons – right out!

and then this:

Popcorn Macaroons

1 cup freshly popped corn

1 cup walnuts or butternuts

3 egg whites

1 cup powdered sugar

Pinch of salt

  1. Heat oven to 350°F. Butter a cooky* sheet.

  2. Chop the popcorn and the nutmeats or put them through the food chopper.

  3. Beat the egg whites stiff and combine with the sugar. Mix with the popcorn and nuts, add salt.

  4. Drop by the spoonful on a buttered cooky sheet.

  5. Bake fifteen minutes in a moderate oven, 350°.

  6. Makes one and half dozen.

 

  • Bowles, Ella Shannon and Dorothy S. Towle. Secrets of New England Cooking. Dover: 2000. First published M. Barrows and Co.: NY. 1947. p. 217.

 

Secrets NE cooking

and then there were other popped corn macaroons.

Popped Corn Macaroons

3/4 cup finely chopped popped corn

3/4 tablespoon melted butter

White 1 egg

5 1/2 tablespoons sugar

1/4 teaspoon salt

1/2 teaspoon vanilla

Blanched and finely chopped almonds

Candied cherries

Process

Add butter to corn; beat white of egg until stiff; add sugar gradually; continue beating. Add to first mixture; add salt and vanilla. Drop from tip of teaspoon on a well buttered baking sheet one and one-half inches apart. With the spoon shape in circles and flatten with a knife, first dipped in cold water. Sprinkle with chopped nut meats and press a shred of candied cherry in top of each macaroon. Bake in a slow oven until daintily browned.

  • The Corn Cook Book. Hiller, Elizabeth O., comp.Chicago, New York [etc.] P.F. Volland company [c1918]

corn cook book vintage

Popcorn macaroons as part of the War effort – the First World War.

Popcorn good. Cookies good. Popcorn cookies….I just have to make enough popcorn to not eat it all before it’s time to make the cookies.

And since it’s hot, it’s only right that there be ice cream to go with the cookies – or is it cookies to go with the ice cream? It seems Mrs. Lincoln (of Boston Cooking School fame) was way ahead of the Ben and Jerry’s curve.

 

 

choc-chip-cookie-dough-detail

Cookie dough great add in – cookies – also great ice cream add in

Macaroon Ice-cream

Dry one dozen stale macaroons, roll or pound them fine and sift through a fine gravy strainer. Add them to ice-cream after either receipt* and flavored with extract of almond or sherry wine. Stir them in when the cream is partly frozen.

               Scald the cream if you wish a firm, solid cream.

               –Mrs. Lincoln. Frozen Dainties.White Mountain Freezer Co., NH. 1889. p. 13. Applewood Books.

  • The two previous receipts are Hollipin Ice-cream and Maraschino Ice-cream, which are both based on the Neapolitan Ice-cream, which has 1 qt. cream, 4 eggs,1 cup sugar and flavoring.

Mrs Lincoln frozen dainties

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Cornbread Song

I left out a little measure in the 3- layer cornbread recipe last time around – so here it is again, with all the tablespoons, teaspoons and cups that you could want!

  1. Three Layer Corn Bread

Easy, glorious and amazing!

1 cup cornmeal (fresh stone ground from your favorite local mill, like Plimoth Grist Mill is best – natch!)

½ cup whole wheat flour

½ cup white flour

¼ cup wheat germ (not in the 1970 version)

2 teaspoon. baking powder

1 teaspoon salt

2 eggs

¼ – ½ cup honey or molasses

¼ cup oil or melted butter

3 cup milk or buttermilk (my fave)

  1. Combine dry ingredients
  2. Combine wet ingredients
  3. Mix together. Mixture will be quite liquidy.
  4. Pour into greased 9×9 pan
  5. Bake at 350° for 50 minutes or until top is springy when gently touched.
  6. As a variation, add a cup of grated cheese – Jack, provolone or parmesan.

Tassajara Bread Book 25th Anniversary Edition (1995)

Tassajara Bread Book (1970) p. 107 (#58)

plimoth grist mill ex

Plimoth Grist Mill in Plymouth – formerly known as The Jenney Grist Mill

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Three Layer Corn Bread

Not so Wicked Wayback….

Talking about 17th century cornbreads, some one recalled a 3 layer cornbread that her mother  used to make….and I recalled this one from Tassajara Bread Book

Tassajara Bread Book

 

  1. Three Layer Corn Bread

Easy, glorious and amazing!

1 cup cornmeal (fresh stone ground from your favorite local mill is best – natch!)

½ c. whole wheat flour

½ cup white flour

¼ cup wheat germ (not in the 1970 version)

2 t. baking powder

1 t salt

2 egg

¼ – ½ honey or molasses

¼ c oil or melted butter

3 cup milk or buttermilk (my fave)

  1. Combine dry ingredients
  2. Combine wet ingredients
  3. Mix together. Mixture will be quite liquidy.
  4. Pour into greased 9×9 pan
  5. Bake at 350° for 50 minutes or until top is springy when gently touched.
  6. As a variation, add a cup of grated cheese – Jack, provolone or parmesan.

Tassajara Bread Book 25th Anniversary Edition (1995)

Tassajara Bread Book (1970) p. 107 (#58)

Oh, the ’70’s…..

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Pie Day!

Above is the shorthand in Samuel Pepys dairy.

Samuel_Pepys

Sam, himself

and he wrote VOLUMES about himself and living in London in the 17th century and himself and a little more about himself….

Samuel_Pepys_diary_manuscript_volumes330px

Volumes!

So when he writes about celebrating wedding anniversaries with

PIES

you want to pay attention…

Monday 3 February 1661/62

After musique practice I went to the office, and there with the two Sir Williams all the morning about business, and at noon I dined with Sir W. Batten with many friends more, it being his wedding-day, and among other froliques, it being their third year, they had three pyes, whereof the middlemost was made of an ovall form, in an ovall hole within the other two, which made much mirth, and was called the middle piece; and above all the rest, we had great striving to steal a spooneful out of it; and I remember Mrs. Mills, the minister’s wife, did steal one for me and did give it me; and to end all, Mrs. Shippman did fill the pye full of white wine, it holding at least a pint and a half, and did drink it off for a health to Sir William and my Lady, it being the greatest draft that ever I did see a woman drink in my life.

I’ve mentioned this before, but some things bear repeating. Celebrating with a pie for each year of marriage.

And so when the 1624 Plimoth couple, Jane and Anthony Annable  have a wedding  anniversary on April 26th, being married on that day in 1619 at All Saints Church, Cambridge, might there be pie in Plimoth? Five pies, perhaps?

All_Saints'_Church,_Cambridge

This is the 19th century All Saints in Cambridge – the actual building that the Annables were married in was torn down. Nice spire!

 

CambridgeCastle17thCentury

This view might be a little closer to what Jane and Anthony remember of Cambridge. And William Brewster – he was at Peterhouse College. And John Robinson. And the Blossoms….lots of Cambridge connections in Plimoth Colony.

So although we don’t know if the Annables remembered their anniversary in any particular way…and with their future Puritan leanings, they might not have been so inclined to celebrate the anniversary of things,

We do know an actual marriage date. And it’s always nice to draw attention to the things we ACTUALLY do, document-wise, know.

A little more Sam on pie:

6 January 1662.

This morning I sent my lute to the Paynter’s, and there I staid with him all the morning to see him paint the neck of my lute in my picture, which I was not pleased with after it was done.

Thence to dinner to Sir W. Pen’s, it being a solemn feast day with him, his wedding day, and we had, besides a good chine of beef and other good cheer, eighteen mince pies in a dish, the number of the years that he hath been married.

pies

Shapes for 17th century pies. Notice the Mince on a Dish.

bride pie mayround234

Robert May’s Bride Pie in The Accomplist Cook – each ring is a different pie piled on the one below….a tier of pies – a tower  of tarts –

pie eater closeup

These people look like they’re having a good pie time. Notice the woman eating in the pie with a her fingers.

SOOOO

One man mentions a type of celebration twice, although it does involve two different couple.

On the other hand – EIGHTEEN mince pies….

If anyone knows a play or a poem or a song or an actual reference of someone who isn’;t hanging out with Samuel Pepys..

SPEAK NOW

and for heaven’s sake,

DON’T HOLD YOUR PEACE.

Unless it’s a piece of pie…..

 

pie eater closeupalone - Copy

She looks pretty happy to have pie. And she’s sharing.

Strange to see how a good dinner and feasting reconciles everybody.

9 November 1665

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Grapenuts Pudding

 

While brewing a little beer at work recently…..

All in the name of research and history….

We had some malted barley and malted wheat brewing and we all noticed how much it smelled like Grape-Nuts.

The healthy, crunchy, good for you cereal.

grapenuts current

And I started to think, ponder, dwell, fantasize, dream  about

GRAPENUTS PUDDING

Not the Puff Pudding, just plain old Grape-nuts custard……

But first to find the Grape-nuts….

Kathy went to the store first and found Grape-nuts Flakes….do they even make grape-nuts any more?????

Another store, with some poking and searching  – Grape-nuts! And a store brand that had much more sugar and salt…..

So the Grape-nuts come home, but the pudding recipe is no longer on the box.

The internet offered several solutions:

grapenut pudding rx

The thin layer of grape-nuts at the bottom is not the layer I’m looking for….keep looking

grape-nut-pudding-Parade mag

This is from Parade Magazine – thicker layer at the bottom, and thinner, crispier layer at top. I hope.

  • INGREDIENTS:

  • 6 large eggs

  • ¾ cup sugar

  • 1 tsp freshly grated nutmeg

  • ½ tsp cinnamon

  • 1 tsp vanilla

  • 4 cups whole milk

  • Grape-Nuts cereal

  • whipped cream

 

  1. Butter a 2-quart baking dish and preheat oven to 400°F.
  2. Whisk eggs, sugar, nutmeg, cinnamon, and vanilla in a large bowl. Whisk in milk.
  3. Pour a thin layer of Grape-Nuts cereal into baking dish, barely covering bottom of dish. Pour in milk mixture.
  4. Bake 30 to 40 minutes, until mostly set but jiggly in center. Serve with whipped cream.

By Sarah DiGregorio  May 10, 2014

https://communitytable.parade.com/288844/sarahdigregorio/grape-nuts-pudding/

 

Still not the thick layer at the bottom I remember, the layer of soggy grape-nuts….

Savour has a version that promises the bottom layer….

December 19, 2007 Saveur

serves 6-8

Ingredients

1 cup Grape-Nuts cereal

1 qt. milk

4 eggs

12 cup sugar

1 tbsp. vanilla extract

14 tsp. fine salt

Grated nutmeg

Instructions

Heat oven to 350°. Grease a 2-quart glass loaf pan with 1 tsp. butter; set aside. Put cereal into a bowl; set aside.

Bring milk just to a boil over medium heat; pour over cereal and set aside to let soak for 5 minutes.

Beat together eggs, sugar, vanilla, and salt in a large bowl. Slowly pour egg mixture into milk mixture while whisking constantly. Transfer to reserved pan; set in a deep roasting pan. Pour enough hot water into roasting pan that it reaches halfway up pudding pan. Bake until just set, about 1 14 hours. Let cool; sprinkle with grated nutmeg.

http://www.saveur.com/article/Recipes/Grape-Nuts-Pudding

 

But now that Spring has finally come, and the weather is in the 70’s, the last thing I want to do is turn on the oven and fuss with a  water bath  – even calling it bain marie doesn’t make it more attractive.

Pea shoots, micro-green salads, pasta with seasonal pestos, eggs with greeny things….It’s still April; there’ll be a day for custard before May.

 

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Goldenrods

Goldenrods

as in Goldenrod Eggs….

Martha Stewart Living April 2017 featured a story about Goldenrods…. not the weeds, the  eggs

msl-April2017cover-225x300

goldenrod eggs Betty Crocker

This is the photo from the Betty Crocker version.

Reading the article I had a Remembrance of Things Past moment, except it was for something that I had never eaten….it was something I’d read about.

It was a book I read when I was nine. Or ten. Definitely before 11.

I think it was called

“Two in Patches”.

Patches was the name of the car. More properly, a roadster. I’m pretty sure it was written in the 1930’s.

roadster

a 1930’s roadster

There was a brother – who was old enough to drive – and a little sister. She was close to my age – 9 or 10 or 11.  They had to drive cross country to get their parents who had been working in the steamy, vine-tangled jungles of Peru. Or hottest Brazil. One of those exotic, faraway places. They had a grown-up, who might have been Grandpa, that they picked up somewhere. They ended up in California, and there was a happily ever after reunion. It would probably be a good companion piece for The Grapes of Wrath.

There were hobos, and not all of them were friendly.

Sometimes they had to beg for work to earn food or gas money. I believe “beg” was their word for it. They gave people rides in exchange for food or gas.

Beret-e1457039149493

This is pretty close to what I remembering  what the girl might have looked like.

It was not a picture book, but there were line drawings.

ANYHOW….

…..at one point they are really hungry and they break into a hen-house. They get caught, and the cagey old farmer invites them in, and the girl cooks up a big old batch of……

EGGS GOLDENROD

So I looked up a recipe,  Thank you Betty Crocker

and merrily went on with my life. It seemed rather like egg sauce on toast, and I can’t say that I craved it or even thought about it again until I opened up Martha Stuart Living.

So, thank you for a trip back in time. Now I need to make some bread to have the toast to make the eggs….

A version roughly contemporary with my remembered childhood volume:

Goldenrod Eggs

Make a thin white sauce by melting

1 Tbls of butter then adding

1 Tbls flour. Add

1 cup milk

½ tsp salt and

Fg pepper. Stir until thick and smooth. Chop the white of

3 hard cooked eggs and add to white sauce. Cut

4 slices of toast in halves lengthwise.

Arrange on a platter and pour sauce over them. Force yolks through a strainer or potato ricer, letting them fall upon the sauce making a mound of yellow. Garnish with parsley and toast points. This may be served on individual dishes.

Serves four.

Wakefield, Ruth Graves. Ruth Wakefield’s Toll House Tried and True Recipes. M. Barrows and Co.: New York. 1937. p. 61.

Ruth Wakefield Tried and True

Evidently, Fanny Farmer published the first Eggs Goldenrod recipe back in 1896. This is based on other peoples say-so. I’ll be on the look-out.

Eggs à la Goldenrod.

3 hard boiled eggs.

1 tablespoon butter.

1 tablespoon flour.

1 cup milk.

1/2 teaspoon salt.

1/8 teaspoon pepper.

5 slices toast.

Parsley.

Make a thin white sauce with butter, flour, milk, and seasonings. Separate yolks from whites of eggs. Chop whites finely, and add them to the sauce. Cut four slices of toast in halves lengthwise. Arrange on platter, and pour over the sauce. Force the yolks through a potato ricer or strainer, sprinkling over the top. Garnish with parsley and remaining toast, cut in points.

bost127

Boston Cooking School 1896

 

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