Category Archives: Wicked Wayback

Grapenuts Pudding

 

While brewing a little beer at work recently…..

All in the name of research and history….

We had some malted barley and malted wheat brewing and we all noticed how much it smelled like Grape-Nuts.

The healthy, crunchy, good for you cereal.

grapenuts current

And I started to think, ponder, dwell, fantasize, dream  about

GRAPENUTS PUDDING

Not the Puff Pudding, just plain old Grape-nuts custard……

But first to find the Grape-nuts….

Kathy went to the store first and found Grape-nuts Flakes….do they even make grape-nuts any more?????

Another store, with some poking and searching  – Grape-nuts! And a store brand that had much more sugar and salt…..

So the Grape-nuts come home, but the pudding recipe is no longer on the box.

The internet offered several solutions:

grapenut pudding rx

The thin layer of grape-nuts at the bottom is not the layer I’m looking for….keep looking

grape-nut-pudding-Parade mag

This is from Parade Magazine – thicker layer at the bottom, and thinner, crispier layer at top. I hope.

  • INGREDIENTS:

  • 6 large eggs

  • ¾ cup sugar

  • 1 tsp freshly grated nutmeg

  • ½ tsp cinnamon

  • 1 tsp vanilla

  • 4 cups whole milk

  • Grape-Nuts cereal

  • whipped cream

 

  1. Butter a 2-quart baking dish and preheat oven to 400°F.
  2. Whisk eggs, sugar, nutmeg, cinnamon, and vanilla in a large bowl. Whisk in milk.
  3. Pour a thin layer of Grape-Nuts cereal into baking dish, barely covering bottom of dish. Pour in milk mixture.
  4. Bake 30 to 40 minutes, until mostly set but jiggly in center. Serve with whipped cream.

By Sarah DiGregorio  May 10, 2014

https://communitytable.parade.com/288844/sarahdigregorio/grape-nuts-pudding/

 

Still not the thick layer at the bottom I remember, the layer of soggy grape-nuts….

Savour has a version that promises the bottom layer….

December 19, 2007 Saveur

serves 6-8

Ingredients

1 cup Grape-Nuts cereal

1 qt. milk

4 eggs

12 cup sugar

1 tbsp. vanilla extract

14 tsp. fine salt

Grated nutmeg

Instructions

Heat oven to 350°. Grease a 2-quart glass loaf pan with 1 tsp. butter; set aside. Put cereal into a bowl; set aside.

Bring milk just to a boil over medium heat; pour over cereal and set aside to let soak for 5 minutes.

Beat together eggs, sugar, vanilla, and salt in a large bowl. Slowly pour egg mixture into milk mixture while whisking constantly. Transfer to reserved pan; set in a deep roasting pan. Pour enough hot water into roasting pan that it reaches halfway up pudding pan. Bake until just set, about 1 14 hours. Let cool; sprinkle with grated nutmeg.

http://www.saveur.com/article/Recipes/Grape-Nuts-Pudding

 

But now that Spring has finally come, and the weather is in the 70’s, the last thing I want to do is turn on the oven and fuss with a  water bath  – even calling it bain marie doesn’t make it more attractive.

Pea shoots, micro-green salads, pasta with seasonal pestos, eggs with greeny things….It’s still April; there’ll be a day for custard before May.

 

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Filed under New England, Pantry, Recipe, The 1960"s, Wicked Wayback

Goldenrods

Goldenrods

as in Goldenrod Eggs….

Martha Stewart Living April 2017 featured a story about Goldenrods…. not the weeds, the  eggs

msl-April2017cover-225x300

goldenrod eggs Betty Crocker

This is the photo from the Betty Crocker version.

Reading the article I had a Remembrance of Things Past moment, except it was for something that I had never eaten….it was something I’d read about.

It was a book I read when I was nine. Or ten. Definitely before 11.

I think it was called

“Two in Patches”.

Patches was the name of the car. More properly, a roadster. I’m pretty sure it was written in the 1930’s.

roadster

a 1930’s roadster

There was a brother – who was old enough to drive – and a little sister. She was close to my age – 9 or 10 or 11.  They had to drive cross country to get their parents who had been working in the steamy, vine-tangled jungles of Peru. Or hottest Brazil. One of those exotic, faraway places. They had a grown-up, who might have been Grandpa, that they picked up somewhere. They ended up in California, and there was a happily ever after reunion. It would probably be a good companion piece for The Grapes of Wrath.

There were hobos, and not all of them were friendly.

Sometimes they had to beg for work to earn food or gas money. I believe “beg” was their word for it. They gave people rides in exchange for food or gas.

Beret-e1457039149493

This is pretty close to what I remembering  what the girl might have looked like.

It was not a picture book, but there were line drawings.

ANYHOW….

…..at one point they are really hungry and they break into a hen-house. They get caught, and the cagey old farmer invites them in, and the girl cooks up a big old batch of……

EGGS GOLDENROD

So I looked up a recipe,  Thank you Betty Crocker

and merrily went on with my life. It seemed rather like egg sauce on toast, and I can’t say that I craved it or even thought about it again until I opened up Martha Stuart Living.

So, thank you for a trip back in time. Now I need to make some bread to have the toast to make the eggs….

A version roughly contemporary with my remembered childhood volume:

Goldenrod Eggs

Make a thin white sauce by melting

1 Tbls of butter then adding

1 Tbls flour. Add

1 cup milk

½ tsp salt and

Fg pepper. Stir until thick and smooth. Chop the white of

3 hard cooked eggs and add to white sauce. Cut

4 slices of toast in halves lengthwise.

Arrange on a platter and pour sauce over them. Force yolks through a strainer or potato ricer, letting them fall upon the sauce making a mound of yellow. Garnish with parsley and toast points. This may be served on individual dishes.

Serves four.

Wakefield, Ruth Graves. Ruth Wakefield’s Toll House Tried and True Recipes. M. Barrows and Co.: New York. 1937. p. 61.

Ruth Wakefield Tried and True

Evidently, Fanny Farmer published the first Eggs Goldenrod recipe back in 1896. This is based on other peoples say-so. I’ll be on the look-out.

Eggs à la Goldenrod.

3 hard boiled eggs.

1 tablespoon butter.

1 tablespoon flour.

1 cup milk.

1/2 teaspoon salt.

1/8 teaspoon pepper.

5 slices toast.

Parsley.

Make a thin white sauce with butter, flour, milk, and seasonings. Separate yolks from whites of eggs. Chop whites finely, and add them to the sauce. Cut four slices of toast in halves lengthwise. Arrange on platter, and pour over the sauce. Force the yolks through a potato ricer or strainer, sprinkling over the top. Garnish with parsley and remaining toast, cut in points.

bost127

Boston Cooking School 1896

 

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Mrs. Wall’s Favorite ….

Muller’s Macaroni and Ham au Gratin

 

The Mrs. Wall in question is Nana Wall.

This is from a clipping of a vintage paper, with no date, but definitely Wayback….

 

Mrs. Wall’s Favorite Mueller’s Elbow Macaroni & Ham Au Gratin

½ of a 1 pound box of elbows

3 TBL butter

4 TBL chopped onion

2 TBS flour

¼ tsp salt

2 ½ Cups milk

1 C cooked ham, cut into strips

1 C grated American cheese

  1. Cook elbows.
  2. Sauté onion in butter, blend in flour, salt and milk. Stir until thick.
  3. Layer sauce with elbows, ham, and cheese in greased casserole dish.
  4. Bake at 375° for 25 minutes or until brown.

6 servings

From undated Mueller’s advertisement with Nana’s picture, also:

“Save $1.47 over average meal of meat, two vegetables for a family of four”

mueller elbow

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Turkey talk

turkey-lectern-boynton

Turkey lectern at Boynton, St. Andrew’s Church, Yorkshire. William Strickland is said to have brought the first turkeys into England, and donated this lectern to his church.

william-strickland-coat-of-arms

William Strickland’s Coat of Arms.    Yep, that’s a turkey on top.

albert-flamen-gallus-indicus-coq-djnde-the-turkey-cock-from-thirteen-birds

 

  •  Albert Flamens. Gallus indicus, Coq d’jnde (The Turkey-cock), from Thirteen Birds Fine Arts Museum San Francisco
turkey-delft-tile-1620

Delft tile – 1620

 

Twelfth Night:

SIR TOBY BELCH: Here’s an overwheening rogue!
FABIAN: O, peace! Contemplation makes a rare turkey-cock of him; how he jets under his advanced plumes!

turkey-brought-to-jahangir-from-goa-in-1612-ustad-mansur-l-brown

Turkey Brought To Jahangir From Goa In 1612

 

Thomas Tusser   Five Hundred Points of Good Husbandry, 1577.

 Good bread and good drinke, a good fier in the hall,

brawne, pudding and souse, and good mustard withall.

Beefe, mutton, and porke, shred pies of the best,

pig, veale, goose and capon, and turkey well drest ;

Cheese, apples and nuts, joly Carols to heare,

as then in the countrie is counted good cheare.

black_spanish_turkey_tom1

Norfolk or Spanish Black – the turkey Columbus brought back to Europe, probably, more or less….

“The Turkie, which is in New England a very large Bird, they breed twice or thrice in a year, if you would preserve the young chickens alive, you must give them no water, for if they come to have their fill of water they will drop away strangely, and you will never be able to rear any of them: they are excellent meat, especially a Turkey-Capon beyond that, for which eight shillings was given, their eggs are very wholesome and restore decayed nature exceedingly. But the French say they breed the leprosie, the Indesses make Coats of Turkie feathers woven for their children.”

john-josselyn-2-voyages

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Bunny, blushing bunny

2006AR0188-01

Embroidered Rabbit. England, 17th century c. 1625 V&A

This little blush colored  bunny ( a detail from an embroidered jacket) made me think of another sort of Blushing Bunny….

Bunny, Miss and Thumper

Miss Bunny and Thumper…from Bambi – but not this blushing bunny

This Blushing Bunny:

blushing bunny LAtimes

From “Worldly Blushing Bunny”  by Charles Perry Jan. 3. 2007 LA Times

One that is Welsh Rabbit ( or rarebit) with a can of tomato soup added

Campbells_Soup_Cans_MOMA

Campbell’s made soup good food; Andy Warhol made soup cans good art

Rabbits go back to Hannah Glasse

Glasse - First catch

A modern edition of The Art of Cookery is titled ” First Catch Your Hare.” Very appropriate for the first Welsh rabbit recipe to be there, too! Even though we all know that hares and rabbits aren’t the same thing…

and then are one or two more, the way there is never ONE rabbit….

18th century ‘Rabbit’ Recipes

1747

To make a Scotch rabbit,toast the bread very nicely on both sides, butter it, cut a slice of cheese about as big as the bread, toast it on both sides, and lay it on the bread.

-1747. Hannah Glasse. The Art of Cookery Made Plain & Easy. Prospect Books ed. p.95

 To make a Welch rabbit, toast the bread on both sides, then toast the cheese on one side, lay it on the toast, and with a hot iron brown the other side. You may rub it over with mustard.

-1747. Hannah Glasse. The Art of Cookery Made Plain & Easy. Prospect Books ed. p.95

To make an English rabbit,  toast the bread brown on both sides, lay it in a plate before the fire, pour a glass of red wine over it, and let it soak the wine up. Then cut some cheese very thin and lay it very thick over the bread, put it in a tin oven before the fire, and it will be toasted and browned presently. Serve it away hot.

-1747. Hannah Glasse. The Art of Cookery Made Plain & Easy. Prospect Books ed. p.95

Or do it thus. Toast the bread and soak it in the wine, set it before the fire, rub butter over the bottom of a plate, lay the cheese on, pour in two or three spoonfuls of white wine, cover it with another plate, set it over a chafing-dish of hot coals for two or three minutes, then stir it till it is done and well mixed. You may stir in a little mustard; when it is enough lay it on the bread, just brown it with a hot shovel.

-1747. Hannah Glasse. The Art of Cookery Made Plain & Easy. Prospect Books ed. p.95

The 1740’s

Scotch Rabbit

Toast a bit of bread on both sides then lay it on a plate before the fire. Pour a glass of red wine over it, and let it soak the wine up, then cut some cheese very thin and lay it thick over the bread and put it in a tin oven before the fire and it will be toasted and browned presently….You may stir in a little mustard.”

—   Scottish manuscript, cookbook of Moffat family.

  • The Thirteen Colonies Cook Book, p. 238

 1753          

To make a Scotch Rabbit.

Toast a Piece of Bread on both Sides, butter it, cut a Slice of Cheese about as big as the Bread, toast it on both sides, and lay it on the Bread.

-1753. The Lady’s Companion. London. p. 264-5.(foodtimeline)

 

To make a Welch Rabbit.

Toast the Bread on both Sides, then Toast the Cheese on one Side, lay on the Toast, and with a hot iron brown the other Side. You may rub it over with Mustard.

-1753. The Lady’s Companion. London. p. 264-5.

To make a Portugal Rabbit.

Toast a Slice of Bread brown on both Sides, then lay it in a Plate before the Fire, pour a Glass of red Wine over it, and let it soak the Wine up; then cut some Cheese very thin, and lay it very thick over the Bread; put it in a Tin Oven before the Fire, and it will be toasted and brown’d presently. Serve it away hot with Sugar over it, and Wine poured over.

-1753. The Lady’s Companion. London. p. 264-5.

Or do it thus.

Toast the Bread and soak it in the Wine, set it before the Fire, cut your Cheese in very thin Slices, rub Butter over the Bottom of a Plate, lay the Cheese on, pour in two or three Spoonfuls of White Wine, cover it with another Plate, set it over a Chafing-dish of hot Coals for two or three Minutes, then stir it till done, and well mixed. You may stir in a little Mustard; when it is enough lay it on the Bread, just brown with a hot Shovel. Serve it away hot.

– 1753. The Lady’s Companion. London. p. 264-5

An Italian Rabbit.

Toast a Slice of Bread, butter it, put upon it a Slice of Cheese the Length of your Bread, Let that be toasted; then put upon the Cheese some Mustard and Pepper, then Parsley minced, and upon the whole some Anchovies, in Pieces, very thick, to serve away.

-1753. The Lady’s Companion. London. p. 264-5

The Welsh are not alone in this! Scotch, English as well as Italian and Portuguese. This is one well traveled rabbit.

rabbit italian c1460

Italian rabbit 15th century

Sooooo

when do rabbits become rarebits?

1852

No. 164. How to Make a Welsh Rarebit.

First, make a round of hot toast, butter it and cover it with thin slices of cheese; put it before the fire until the cheese is melted, then season with mustard, pepper, and salt, and eat the rarebit while hot.

 

  • Francatelle, Charles. A Plain Cookery Book. p. 78.

But that’s not the end of rabbits – rarebits and rabbits continue together through the centuries

1858

Welsh rabbit.

Welsh rabbit is made by melting cheese and adding wine and other seasonings.

  • Miss Beecher’s Domestic Receipt Book. p. 206.

I haven’t been able to fill in the 100 year gap between The Lady’s Companion and Miss Beecher (who is Catherine Beecher, Harriot Beecher Stowe’s sister), but this already became more obsessive/compulsive then it began.

In the 2oth century, English Monkey, Yorkshire Buck, Scotch Rarebit, Cheese Muff, The Mackie, Oyster Rarebit, Midnight Rabbit and of course, Blushing Bunny.

Welsh Rarebit

6 servings

Melt in the top of a double boiler over simmering water:

1 tablespoon butter

Stir in and heat until warm:

1 cup beer, ale, milk, or cream

Gradually, stir in:

4 cups shredded sharp Cheddar or Colby (1 pound)

Cook, stirring constantly with a fork, until the cheese is melted. Stir in:

1 egg, beaten

    1 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce

    1 teaspoon salt

    ½ teaspoon sweet paprika

    ¼ teaspoon dry mustard

    (¼ teaspoon curry powder)

    Pinch of ground red pepper

Cook, stirring, stirring, until slightly thickened, about 1 minute.

Serve at once on top of

12 slices white, rye, or other bread of your choice, toasted, or 18 crackers

 The Mackie

Prepare Welsh Rarebit, above, topping toasted slices of white bread with sliced tomatoes and crisp bacon before covering with cheese mixture.

Blushing Bunny

Prepare Welsh Rarebit, above, substituting tomato juice or canned condensed cream of tomato soup for the beer or the milk.

  • Rombauer, Irma S., Becker, Marion Rombauer and Ethan Becker. Joy of Cooking. Scribner: NY. p. 112.

 

joy of cooking 75th

and on the Rabbit/Rarebit debate, Joy of Cooking says this:

“Our correspondence is closed on the subject of rarebit versus rabbit. We stick to “rarebit” because “rabbit” already means something else. We can only answer the controversy with a story. A stranger trying to calm a small crying boy: “I wouldn’t cry like that if I were you.” Small boy: “You cry your way and I’ll cry mine.”

 

I realize that the history or recipes and food  isn’t quite the same as MY history with food and recipes, I’ve stared another blog  for the historical things. Foodways Pilgrim will continue as my journey with food. But for the historical inquiry, The Backstory of Welsh Rabbit (or Rarebit, as the case may be) or What Did They Serve at the First Thanksgiving sorts of questions/stories/cool background, that will now be at Plays with Fire.

Caravaggio_-_Cena_in_Emmaus 1601 National galleryLondon

Cena in Emmaus – 1601 –  Caravaggio at National Gallery, London

Caravaggio_supperat Emmaus Milan Brera Fine Arts Academy1606

Caravaggio, Supper at Emmaus (again)  this in 1606 and now in Milan at the Brera Fine Arts Academy .How has the food changed – and why?

   Plays With Fire

Van Goh rabbits in landscape

Vincent Van Gogh Landscape with Rabbits 1889

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To make Chocolate Cream

In 1604 Lady Elynor Fetiplace put together a commonplace book – her receipts for food and medicine.  In 1986 Hilary Spurling published excerpts form this collection, with notes and explanations.

EF pb

This is how I first met Elynor Fetiplace back in the 1980’s.

I was able to borrow this volume, but somehow I never bought a copy for myself.

It wasn’t until this century that I got the transcription from Stuart Press. (The Complete Receipt Book of Ladie Elynor Fetiplace: Late Tudor/early Stuart. Never before published in full this is a 3 volume set transcription of the whole original text. About 90% of the work is household remedies from a country gentlewoman the remainder mainly culinary. Stuart Press    )

ef complete3

In historical documents, nothing beats the real thing. Lacking that, the next best thing is an image of the real thing, a photocopy or an electronic image, some sort of facsimile. But even then there are nuances that can be easily overlooked. Skepticism is an important tool of historical research. Transcript is next best from that, and it’s  only if you assume some  error and omission are present.The question is where and what…..and move forward anyhow.

And in this transcript is a recipe To make Chocolate Cream. It’s on the same page as a Barley Cream.

.

Chocolate Melendez

Luis Melendez – that’s a chocolate pot with the handle from a chocolate mill in the background

 

To make Chocolate Cream

Take a Quart of cream, 3 ounces of Chocolate grated, boyle it well together & let it stand till tis cold, & then put in ye whites of 6 Eggs beaten to a froth & sweeten it to your Taste, and then mill it up.

The Complete Receipt Book of Ladie Elynor Fetiplace. Vol. Three. Transcription. Stuart Press: 1999. p.38.

To Make Chocolate Cream in January 2016:

  • Take a quart of cream – we used heavy whipping cream
  • 3 ounces chocolate – we use a 2.7 ounce disk of Taza
  • TazaClassicCollection_large

    the one that was most chocolate and no added anything

    Grate the chocolate into the cream and heat, while stirring to get the chocolate all melted

  • ChocolatePot 1682

    This is a 17th century chocolate pot. If you look close at the bottom of the pot there’s a chocolate mill there, too.

    The ‘A’ plan for cooling this off was to pour it out of the pot and into a bowl, which we could put in the snow…but no snow this January day, not even very much cold (this is NOT a complaint!) so we had to haul it into a fridge to cool.

  • Because 21st century chicken aren’t raised quite the way they were in the past, and Salmonella is an issue with raw eggs, I had searched , unsuccessfully for pasteurized eggs. I ended up with pasteurized egg whites, so we didn’t actually crack any eggs for this dish.  used a wire whisk for the whipping, lacking a chocolate mill.
  • chocolate mills 1687 French

    1687 French mills – Bleguy

    choc whip frotehr

    sold on Amazon as a Wooden Whisk Stirrer Molinillo Mexican Chocolate Cocoa Stirrer Frother. Yep, that about sums it up.

     

    Sweetened with a little sugar, whipped some more……

     

    chocolate cream 30Jan2016

    This is what our final product looked like – a very light very tasty chocolate mouse sort of dish.

    There was none left.

That good.

Sometimes the past should be repeated.

Again and again.

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11 Pie-ers Pieing

Oh, It’s PIPES?

MagrittePipe

Magritte – This is not a pipe – at least not the sort the song means

Angel_playing_bagpipes,_St._Giles,_Edinburgh

Imagine 10 more piping…

Why aren’t there more PIES in the Twelve Days of Christmas?????

Christmas is not just the retail season leading up to Xmas day…it’s also the twelve days following.Christmas Pies used to reign where there is now Christmas Pudding  and Christmas Cookies…Christmas Pie also went by Shred Pie or Mincemeat Pie…..but now the meat is mostly missing, and sometimes they’re known as Mince Pie.

If you eat a mince pie on each of the 12 days of Christmas, you’ll have good luck in each of the 12 months ahead. It’s even better luck if you eat one mince pie in each of  12 different houses -at least that way you won’t wear out your welcome.

We did not have mince pie at  Christmas this year. But the Christmas season isn’t over YET, so there’s time…..

Sometimes Mincemeat Pies were big, raised pies.

pie spanish pieA Pereda 1678

detail of a raised pie, Antonio de. Pereda, 1678

To make minced Pies or Chewits of a Leg of Veal, Neats-Tongue, Turkey, or Capon.

Take to a good leg of veal six pound of beef-suet, then take the leg of veal, bone it, parboil it, and mince it very fine when it is hot; mince the suet by it self very fine also, then when they are cold mingle them together, then season the meat with a pound of sliced dates, a pound of sugar, an ounce of nutmegs, an ounce of pepper, an ounce of cinamon, half an ounce of ginger, half a pint of verjuyce, a pint of rose-water, a preserved orange, or any peel fine minced, an ounce of caraway-comfits, and six pound of currans; put all these into a large tray with half a handful of salt, stir them up all together, and fill your pies, close them up, bake them, and being baked, ice them with double refined sugar, rose-water, and butter.

Make the paste with a peck of flour, and two pound of butter boil’d in fair water or liquor, make it up boiling hot.

Robert May. The Accomplist Cook. 1674

 

RobertMayTheAccomplishtCookFrontispiece

Somewhere along the way in the 18th century Brandy and Other Spirits found their way into mincemeat. Often, quite a bit of spirits, ostensibly for ‘preservation’. Truth be told, much of the newly Industrialized World was in quite a pickle through the mid-17oo’s and the 1800’s. Prohibition was  not for naught, as it were.

To make mince-pies the best way.

Take three pounds of suet shred very fine, and chopped as small as possible; two pounds of raisins stoned, and chopped as fine as possible; two pounds of currants nicely picked, washed, rubbed, and dried at the fire; half a hundred of fine pipins, pared, cored and chopped small; half a pound of sugar pounded fine; a quarter an ounce, of mace, a quarter of an ounce of cloves, two large nutmegs, all beat fine; put all together into a great pan, and mix it well together with half a pint of brandy, and half a pint of sack ; put it down close in a stone pot, and it will keep good for four months.

1740. Hannah Glasse. The Art of Cookery Made Plain and Easy.

Art_of_Cookery_frontispiece

and one more historic recipe…

MINCEMEAT (Mrs. Brotherton’s Recipe).

INGREDIENTS – 6 lemons, ½ lb. of apples, 1 lb. of raisins, weighed after being stoned,1 lb. of currants, 1 lb. of sugar, ½ lb. of fresh butter, 4 ozs. each of candied orange and citron.

Mode. – Grate the yellow rind, cut the lemons in two, and squeeze out the juice. Boil the rinds in spring water till tender, but not soft, changing the water 4 or 5 times to take out the bitterness, and putting a large tablespoon of salt in the water in which they are boiled. When done, drain the water from them, and take out the seeds and the skins, then chop them with the raisins in a wooden bowl. When finely chopped, add the currants, sugar, the apples, previously prepared as for sauce, the grated rind of the lemons, the juice, ½ a tablespoonful of cayenne pepper, a small teaspoonful of mace, another of powdered cinnamon, 15 drops almond flavor, the candied orange and citron, cut in thin slices, and lastly the butter, melted, and poured in.

This mincemeat may have brandy or other spirits added to it the same as ordinary mincemeat, and it keeps fresh longer; but, as teetotalism and vegetarianism so often go hand in hand, we have not put it amongst the ingredients.*

The pastry recipe may be used for the mince pies or ordinary puff-paste.

Average cost, for this quantity, 3s.

Seasonable at Christmas.

-1903. Mrs. Beeton’s Cookery Book : A Household Guide. J.S. Doige, Blackpool (fasc. Rigby Pub. Ltd, 1981.) p. 185, section: Vegetarianism. * bold mine kmw

Mrs Beetons pb

This is one of the Mrs Beeton’s that I own. I got this on my first trip to London in the early ’80’s on a shop on Charring Cross Road.

Mince_Pie

Modern day Mince Pie are often small pies

Tuesday January 5th is the 11th day of Christmas, so get mincing!

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Quince

Quince are botanically speaking, cousins to apple and pears. And wonderful – once cooked, turning red.

quince paste

16th century quince tree

16th century quince tree

Edward Johnson in The Wonderworking Providence of Sion’s Savior in New England of 1654 says,
“…so that in this poor Wilderness hath not onely equalized England in food, but goes beyond it in some places for the great plenty of wine and sugar, which is ordinarily spent, apples, pears, and quince tarts instead of their former Pumpkin Pies.”
– (p. 210, 1910 ed.)
We’ll get back to the ‘former Pumpkin Pie’ nonsense later….but there were Quince at the Stop & Shop…..
Van Gogh

These were painted by Van Gogh, not Stop & Shop

To make a slic’t Tart of Quinces, Wardens, Pears, Pippins, in slices raw of divers Compounds.
The foresaid fruits being finely pared, and slic’t in very thine slices; season them with beaten cinamon, and candied citron minced, candied orange, or both, or raw orange peel, raw lemon peel, fennil-seed, or caraway-seed or without any of these compounds or spices, but the fruits alone one amongst the other; put to ten pippins six quinces, six wardens, eight pears, and two pound of sugar; close it up, bake it; and ice it as the former tarts.
Thus you may also bake it in patty-pan, or dish, with cold butter paste.
– Robert May. The Accomplist Cook 1660
Quince Fede Galizia MILAN 1578 – 1630

Fede Galizia – Milano 1578-1630

This is what one of my quince tarts looked like

This is what one of my quince tarts looked like

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Are you going to Marlborough Fair?

Not to be confused with Scarborough Fair….or the song of that name.

Marlborough Pie is a rich, enriched sort of custard and apple concoction that is far too easy and good, good, good to have ever fallen out of favor.

And now seems to be having a teeny-tiny rebirth.

First – there are various historic sites that keep it alive, thank you Old Sturbridge Village

Here’s Ryan Beckman on  pie

and then a story on Eater : what-is-marlborough-pie

…which could be why I’ve been fielding Marlborugh Pie questions all week…

Here’s a recipe from OSV

Marlbor pud RX

There;’s a certain (tasty) place where pie and pudding intersect. Pudding Pie is a real (GOOD) thing.

marlbor pud OSV

Tastes like a million bucks! Don’t skimp on the sherry…

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Filed under Autumn, Pie, Thanksgiving, Wicked Wayback

Toast

Toast is sooo underrated……

Toast and Cheese  from food52

toast toaster

Toast Toaster – mosaic of 3,053 pieces of toast

Check out the artist here

Boston Cream Pie French Toast from King Arthur Flour here

As IF - either French Toast OR Boston Cream Pie weren't enough...Thank you, King Arthur Flour for putting them together!

As IF – either French Toast OR Boston Cream Pie weren’t enough…Thank you, King Arthur Flour for putting them together!

Toast

is such a little word that holds so many meanings..

It’s tea and toast,

Toast fork - to make toast old school

Toast fork – to make toast old school

Cinnamon toast, and therefore cinnamon toast crunch

cinnamon toast

SONY DSC

SONY DSC

A toast sandwich is a sandwich made by putting a thin slice of toast between two thin slices of bread with a layer of butter, and adding salt and pepper to taste. Its origins can be traced to the Victorian years. A recipe for making it is included in the 1861 Book of Household Management by Isabella Beeton

Toast sandwich

Toast sandwich

Sweet or savory, breakfast or supper, summer or winter…..toast is a Good Thing.

Toast-3

Toast – ordinary bread improved.

Georg Flegel. Still-Life with Clove Pinks - 1630-1635.

Georg Flegel. Still-Life with Clove Pinks – 1630-1635. Toast soldiers!

Some 17th century toasts……..

Toasts of Divers sorts.

First, in Butter or Oyl.

Take a cast of fine roals or round manchet, chip them, and cut them onto toasts, fry them in clarified butter, frying oil, or sallet oyl, but before you fry them, dip them in fair water, and being fried, serve them in a clean dish piled one upon another, and sugar between.

  1. 175.

Otherways.

Toste them before the fire, and run them over with butter, sugar, or oyl.

  1. 175

Cinamon Toasts.

Cut fine thin toasts, then toast them on a gridiron, and lay them in ranks in a dish, put to them fine beaten cinamon mixed with sugar and some claret, warm them over the fire, and serve them hot.

  1. 176.

French Toasts.

Cut French bread, and toast it in pretty thick toasts on a clean gridiron, and serve them steeped in claret, sack, or any wine, with sugar and juyce of orange.

  1. 176
  2. Robert May. The Accomplist Cook. Prospect Book ed. pp noted.

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