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Rinktum Ditty

Here’s another cheese toast/toasted cheese to add to the mix from Cynthia Clampitt

The World's Fare

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It was the name of this recipe that caught my eye initially, as I was flipping through an old cookbook. Then, looking over the ingredients, I was definitely interested in trying it. Seriously, anything with melted cheese is going to be pretty good. Rinktum Ditty is something of a spin on Welsh rarebit (or do you say “rabbit”–both terms are ancient and correct), but with tomatoes taking the place of beer.

It appears that Rinktum Ditty came to America from England, specifically from Cheshire. It became associated with New England, but it clearly spread nationwide, even appearing in a 1917 collection of recipes in Arizona.

Some versions call for cooked tomatoes, others for tomato sauce, and a few Depression-era versions used canned tomato soup. I decided to update it a bit, using a can of “petite diced” tomatoes. It made it a bit chunkier, but the flavor of the cheese…

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Rabbit or Rarebit?

Now to find Irish Rarebit….

Plays with Fire

First, hitting the books

The recipes, by century

18th century

1747

To make a Scotch rabbit,

toast the bread very nicely on both sides, butter it, cut a slice of cheese about as big as the bread, toast it on both sides, and lay it on the bread.

-1747. Hannah Glasse. The Art of Cookery Made Plain & Easy. Prospect Books ed. p.95

 

To make a Welch rabbit,

toast the bread on both sides, then toast the cheese on one side, lay it on the toast, and with a hot iron brown the other side. You may rub it over with mustard.

-1747. Hannah Glasse. The Art of Cookery Made Plain & Easy. Prospect Books ed. p.95

To make an English rabbit,

toast the bread brown on both sides, lay it in a plate before the fire, pour a glass of red wine…

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Happy Birthday!

 

Happy Birthday, Mother Mine

and his and his

and hers

and his and his

roses bunch

The number of candles above is representative and not actual.

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Rabbit

rabbit

Rabbit by Choi Buk (1712- 1760).

Rabbit by Choi Buk 1712-1760

Rabbit study by Beatrix Potter

Beatrix Potter

Trois_lievres_raisin_Kitao(1)

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rabbit rabbit rabbit etc.

Rabbits (Les lapins)

Lucien Pissarro (1863 – 1944)

wood engraving in black on Japan paper, 16.3 cm x 23.8 cm
Van Gogh Museum, Amsterdam (Vincent van Gogh Foundation)

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Irish Mac and Cheese

Since once again St Patrick’s Day falls on a Friday in Lent….the Cardinal has said it’s alright for Bostonians to eat Corned Beef and green veg/beer of their choice. I will NOT be having Mac and Cheese….read more:

Foodways Pilgrim

Macaroni is not the least bit Irish. Calling it Mac only makes it sound like it is.

But if  you are Irish and Catholic,  St. Patrick’s Day comes smack dab in the middle of Lent and if it’s on a Friday night , no less, even if you are in the Archdioceses of Boston and even if St Patrick is the Patron saint of the Archdiocese  and even if there is dispensation for corned beef and cabbage……you might very well be having macaroni and cheese for supper.

st patrick St Patrick, chasing  snakes and green macaroni and cheese out of Ireland

I don’t remember the details. We had plenty of St Patrick’s Days with Corned Beef and Cabbage but this one was most notably not one of those.  Was my Irish father working late? He loved his corned beef and cabbage, especially if corned beef would lead to corned beef hash….

Was…

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Onions….

van-gogh-still-life-with-a-plate-of-onions-january-1889-oil-on-canvas-50-x-64-cm-kroller-muller-museum-otterlo

Van Gogh, Still Life with a Plate of Onions, January 1889. Oil on canvas, 50 x 64 cm. Kröller-Müller Museum, Otterlo.

 

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Throwback Thursdays

This might very well be the Introduction, or perhaps the Preface to “Do You REALLY Live Here? My Life as a Pilgrim”.

Foodways Pilgrim

I’ve been studying Thanksgiving professionally since 1980.

Semi-professionally since the Kennedy administration. My first area of expertise was the relish tray, specifically black olives,

Your Basic Black - olive, that is. Your Basic Black – olive, that is.

the canned pitted ones that fit over your fingertips so you can wiggle them at your brothers.

This is not me, and yet it was me....olives are very philosophical, as well as tasty This is not me, and yet it was me….olives are very philosophical, as well as tasty

My brothers were never the least bit squeamish, but they’ve always kept a respectable distance from black olives.

That first year of professional study was a fluke – a 10 week position as a Pilgrim at Plimoth Plantation.

I wasn’t going to make a CAREER out of it, and end up in Food Network Magazine’s Odd Job  or anything

How about a throwback to Thanksgiving? I hereby that Throwback Thurdays will be Thanksgiving themed here at Foodways Pilgrim

Here I am on How2heroes about…

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Winter Solstice

header: Adam Elsheimer, The Flight into Egypt c. 1609

When I started this blog – three years ago today – I hadn’t even registered that it was the day after the Winter Solstice  – the day the light GROWS

Each day will be longer, each night shorter – more light, less darkness.

here comes the sun

 het-licht-detail-de-zaaier-vincent-van-gogh

There’s still plenty of food and table talk ahead.

adam_elsheimer_-_die_flucht_nach_agypten_alte_pinakothek_2

This is the rest of the painting in the header

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Jag

Rare Iron Pie Crimper/jag with Whale-Tail Handle and 1794 Large Cent Wheel, American, first half 19th century, with notched border and distinctive semi-circular tail reminiscent of a whale’s tail, the wheel composed of an altered American 1794 large cent with depiction of Lady Liberty. Typical wear. L 5 1/2″.

pie-jag-shelburne-musuem

Maker unknown, Double Eagle scrimshaw pie jag(detail), mid-19th century, carved, incised ivory colored with red wax, brass and silver, H. 7 in., W. 4 in, D. 1 1/2 in. Gift of George G. Frelinghuysen. Shelburne Museum. Image by David Bohl.

Sometimes  I choose what to write. Sometimes it chooses me.I’ve had lots of pie events lately, so pie has been on my brain. Pie, pie accessories, pie recipes….I was going to write about pie jags….or cookies….or some combination thereof….

piecrustmoldwilton

Wilton has a pie crust rim mold, is cutting and pasting is out of your league

BUT

pie jags lead to just plain jag….

A dish of rice and beans.

I didn’t  know about jag until I moved to Plymouth, where it is so common to be customary on any sort of potluck table. Sometimes with beans, sometimes with pease, sometimes with linguica or other tube meat  – always hits the spot.

 

linquica-gaspars

Paula Peters wrote about it years ago in the Cape Cod Times Finding the Recipe for jag and more recently Paula Marcoux wrote about Jagacida for edible South Shore and South Coast Magazine. And here’s a wordpress blogger who writes of three generations of jag

I have rice, and an onion, and beans instead of pease…..and a pot to cook it in and some smoked paprika. Time to put on the rice and beans.

 

 

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