Category Archives: The 1980’s

National Apple Pie Day

was May 13th.

How did I miss this????

Who makes apple pie in MAY??????

There’s rhubarb and blueberries and strawberries…..but apples…

Not still and not yet.

Now, if were

National Mock Apple Pie Day

I could get behind that. A little pastry practice for all the lovely real fruits that are just ahead.

ritz cracker

Ritz Cracker did not invent the mock apple pie….but it certainly popularized it.

When there are no apples people still wanted apple pie. Dried apples were the thing that used to extend the season. After the fresh apples, the dried apple. After the dried apple, the crackers….and then Spring and Summer fruits until the new apples.

Here’s an earlier then Ritz version:

applepiepart1applepie part2

A CALIFORNIA PIONEER APPLEPIE-1852
Mrs. B. C. Whiting.

Break four soda crackers into an earthen bowl. Pour
over them a pint of cold water, made very tart with citric
acid. When soft, but not mashed, removed the soda crackers
to your pie plate, with the under crust already on; then sift
over two tablespoons of light brown sugar, and a little all-

spice and cinnamon to flavor. (The brown sugar and spice
give the requisite color), after which put on a prettily per-
forated top crust, and bake in a very quick oven a few
moments.
The deception was most complete and readily accepted.
Apples at this early date were a dollar a pound, and we
young people all craved a piece of mother’s applepie to
appease our homesick feelings.

applepiesource

Los Angeles, C. Simpson Methodist Episcopal Church (Ladies Social Circle).1894.How We Cook in Los Angeles. A practical cook-book containing six hundred or more recipes….including a French, German and Spanish department with menus, suggestions for artistic table decorations, and souvenirs.pp.240-1.

 

 

Here’s what used to be on the back of the Ritz box:

mockapplepieritz

I have made this pie. More than once. The first time I made it, there was a certain amount of disbelief. So, I made it a second time (in the same 24 hours) –  with witnesses.

Which also happened the second time I made it…..and I have made it since then, too. Because sometimes crackers are better then apples.

.It’s still a little hard to believe how much like apple pie it tastes. And looks. And smells.

Is it the cinnamon?

Or is it just how bland so many of our apples have gotten that they taste like crackers?

Part of the ruse is science.

pie-science2

Newsweek has an article on the appleless apple pie.

Part is that your eyes and nose believe, and then convince your brain.

mock_apple_pie_Savour2008

from Saveour, Feb 2008

And it’s really, really good – if  ironic  – with cheddar cheese

apple pie w cheddar

This is pretty orange cheddar….but for cheese and cracker pie …

Just like Real Apple Pie.

 

 

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Filed under Eating, Pantry, Perception ways, Pie, Spring, The 1980's

Mushroom Mouth

Growing up, a mushroom mouth was not the mouth of a mushroom lover…..

br pizza

Bob Ross and Happy Pizza with Mushrooms Mouth…..

‘Mushroom mouth’ was the English translation of an Italian phrase , ‘mussi di funghi’…. that meant , literally – mushroom mouth. Except, of course, this isn’t how I can find the phrase on the Internet….mouth tranlates to  – apertura, or  bocca, but I can’t find a mussi...but it’s still a thing….even if it’s a dialect thing

Like pursed lips….

J Lo blowing a kiss

Not to be confused with the kiss blowing pursed lips…

JLo pursed lips

This is the very ‘not my happy mouth’ mushroom mouth look. Thank you, J Lo for being so expressive!

and now some mushrooms….

mushroom, white

White mushrooms

mushrooms

Lots of lovely mushrooms

 

and they had already-sliced fresh mushroom on the markdown bin at the store….so I snapped them up. I used to make a really easy, really tasty mushroom sauce for pasta, so easy that if I couldn’t remember which cookbook it was in, I could probably make something close anyhow….

 

My son is not a fan of the mushroom, so most of the last 20 years I haven’t used mushrooms as a main ingredient (although they have played supporting roles in a few things)….

I looked for the cook book with the terrific mushroom sauce recipe  and found the recipe, but not exactly in the book I thought it would be in .It wasn’t quite as I remembered it. The page was too small and there weren’t as many smudges as I remembered, and the type face was off…..but it was here:

NH best of Italian cooking

This book also came out later then I remembered using the recipe  and I remember making the sauce in the early ‘8o’s……mystery..

Mushroom Spaghetti Sauce

Salsa di funghi per spaghetti

6 tablespoons butter, divided

4 medium onions, thinly sliced

2 pounds mushrooms, sliced

Salt

Fresh ground pepper

¼ teaspoon ground nutmeg

1 cup heavy cream

  1. Heat 3 tablespoons butter in a heavy skillet over medium heat. Add onions and sauté until golden brown, 5-7 minutes, stirring frequently.
  2. Cover and turn the heat to low. Cook for 20 minutes, or until the onions are very, meltingly, soft, stirring occasionally.
  3. In another pan, one large enough for the full sauce, melt the other 3 tablespoons butter. Cook the mushrooms until tender. Season with salt and pepper and the nutmeg. Keep hot.
  4. Meanwhile, start cooking 1 pound spaghetti.
  5. Five minutes before serving….add the cream to the mushrooms and onions. Heat, but do not let boil or it will curdle.
  6. Drain the cooked spaghetti, add the sauce, mix and serve with grated Parmesan cheese.
  7. Easy, rich, delicious.

Adapted from Nika Hazelton’s From Nika Hazelton’s Kitchen.Viking, 1985. p.237. and Nika Hazelton The Best of Italian Cooking. Weathervane Books, 1989. p.163-4.

From NH kitchen large

This is the volume with the smudges…she used the same recipe in 2 volumes! Mystery solved.

There was also a time during the ’70’s that I had confused Nika Hazelton with Marcella Hazen, just based on their names and that they were both producing Italian cook books. There was no Internet or social media, so all I had was names on a book cover and my poor memory to depend on.

 

 

Regional It. Kitch

This is the other Nika that I have

Oh, Look!

Chocolate Cake!

Looks like I’ll be spending a little more time with Nika….

Nika Hazelton

Nika Hazelton

 

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Filed under Books, Recipe, The 1980's

Salads, Dressing

Claude Monet Jar of Peaches

Why did the peach blush?

Because it saw the salad dressing!

 There are so many things that can be salad…..really – like

Potato to make Potato Salad

Potato to make Potato Salad

Tuna for Tuna Salad (this tuna is named Charlie)

Tuna for Tuna Salad (this tuna is named Charlie)

Fruit in fruit salad

Fruit in fruit salad

even kale can be a salad

Kale and Chickpea Salad

Kale and Chickpea Salad

But the mostest salad I’ve eaten in my days is a lettucey, leafy greens base with stuff in/on/around and topped with

Dressing

Dressing that increasing came in bottle form…..

Ken's Blue Cheese Salad Dressing is on of my faves...it reminds me of steak and baked potato and a side salad. Now I mostly eat if without the steak and I'm as likely to put it on the potato as the salad. Also good on the sandwich made from the leftover steak - a thing I did not know existed in the world until I moved out and away from 4 brothers - in a sandwich with sliced tomato the next day for lunch

Ken’s Blue Cheese Salad Dressing is one of my faves.

Ken’s  reminds me of steak and baked potato and a side salad. Now I mostly eat it without the steak, and I’m as likely to put it on the potato as the salad. But when there IS steak it is also good on  leftover steak – a thing I did not know existed in the world until I moved out and away from 4 brothers – in a sandwich with sliced tomato the next day for lunch. Excellent good, in fact.

Jars replace bottle in the late '80's and '90's as even better salad dressing.

Jars replace bottles in the late ’80’s and ’90’s as even better salad dressing.

My son is a ranch Dressing lover, so this was on our table for years......

My son is a Ranch Dressing lover, so this was on our table much of the ’90’s

But this is the ranch dressing he really wanted, so these packets were part of our pantry for years...

But this is the Ranch Dressing he really wanted, so these packets were part of our pantry for years…

Newman's Own is my current bottle of choice. Bottle are convenient to carry to work for lunch salad.

Newman’s Own is my current bottle of choice. Bottle are convenient to carry to work for lunch salad.

The supper salad – the home game, versus the away game lunch salad – was increasing dressed in the bowl, like I was taught in ’60’s, but with more variety, like in Red, White and Blue Salad, which I had thought I had already shared, but it’s not showing up here when I searched for it…so here it is, possibly again

RED, WHITE AND BLUE SALAD

2 cups red cherry tomatoes (or grape tomatoes or big ole vine ripened tomatoes, chopped and equal to the grapes)

2 cups white grapes

Optional: ½ cup roasted and chopped nuts

Dressing:

         1 Tablespoon Blue cheese

1 Tablespoon wine vinegar

3 Tablespoons yoghurt

2 Tablespoons oil

1 garlic clove

½ teaspoon smoked paprika

  1. Put all dressing ingredients in blender and blend (use a food processor if you prefer. Creamy, rich, tasty goodness.
  2. Put aside.
  3. Wash and dry the fruits. Cut the cherry tomatoes and grapes in half over the bowl you toss them into.
  4. Top with the dressing and mix.
  5. Top with chopped nuts if you prefer.

Dorry Baird Norris. Sage Cottage Herb Garden Cookbook. The Globe Pequot Press. 1991, 1995. p.267

Sage Cottage Herb Garden Cook Book by Dorrie Norris

Sage Cottage Herb Garden Cook Book by Dorrie Norris

Mason jars are good to mix salad dressing in - NOT the salads, which need bowls or plates.

Mason jars are good to mix salad dressing in – NOT the salads, which need bowls or plates.

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Filed under 1990's, Summer, The 1980's

#NationalBagelfestDay

This is NOT to be confused with National Bagel Day, which was back in February. Excuse me, the mountains of snow had me otherwise occupied then.

Lately there’s been a  little push back to all these daily  ‘holidays’ .Who says it’s a holiday? Why so many?

But Bagelfest Day actually has some juice behind it, although bagels are better with cream cheese and lox then juice:

Murray Lender.

FILE - In this July 24, 1998 photo, Murray Lender kisses the world's largest bagel while baker Larry Wilkerson, left, and Lender's Bagel Bakery manager Jim Cudahy watch after the weight of the bagel was revealed during Bagelfest in Mattoon, Ill.  Murray Lender, who helped turn his father's small Connecticut bakery into a national company that introduced bagels to many Americans for the first time, has died in Florida. He was 81. Lender's wife, Gillie Lender, tells The Associated Press that her husband died Wednesday, March 21, 2012 at a hospital in Miami from complications from a fall he suffered 10 weeks ago. The couple lived in both Aventura, Fla., and Woodbridge, Conn.  (AP Photo/Journal Gazette, Doug Lawhead)

FILE – In this July 24, 1998 photo, Murray Lender kisses the world’s largest bagel while baker Larry Wilkerson, left, and Lender’s Bagel Bakery manager Jim Cudahy watch after the weight of the bagel was revealed during Bagelfest in Mattoon, Ill. Murray Lender, who helped turn his father’s small Connecticut bakery into a national company that introduced bagels to many Americans for the first time, has died in Florida. He was 81. Lender’s wife, Gillie Lender, tells The Associated Press that her husband died Wednesday, March 21, 2012 at a hospital in Miami from complications from a fall he suffered 10 weeks ago. The couple lived in both Aventura, Fla., and Woodbridge, Conn. (AP Photo/Journal Gazette, Doug Lawhead)

Murray Lender began this celebration back in 1986.

Because of Murray Lender many of us have bagel memories…..because he sold them frozen, so a bagel could be in any supermarket freezer, not just at the local bagel shop.

bagels Lenders plain

And of course, once bagels got in the All-American kitchen, the All-American fiddling followed….

Bagel Pizza - the hole in the center is a real design flaw with HOT melted cheese.

Bagel Pizza – the hole in the center is a real design flaw with HOT melted cheese. Stick to English Muffin Pizzas!

And then the bagels themselves were fiddled…..

Fiddlebow Knife and Bagel slicer

Fiddle-bow Knife and Bagel Slicer

and then the bagel types were fiddled….

Once a Blueberry enters, I'm pretty sure it's no longer a bagel.

Once a Blueberry enters, I’m pretty sure it’s no longer a bagel.

To celebrate this holiday I had breakfasted at my fave coffee shop on a pumpernickel bagel with bacon scallion cream cheese, a combination I first tried at the urging of a friend who had steered to really good food in the past. Not traditional, but excellent good.

Murray lender even got bagels on the Tonight Show with Johnny Carson

Murray Lender even got bagels on the Tonight Show with Johnny Carson

Murray Lender didn’t just make the bagels – he made the commercials for them .

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Filed under The 1980's

Biscuits -Buttermilk and Bakewell

Back in the long ago olden days – the ’80’s – I pretty much cooked my through the McCalls Cooking School binders.

Mcalls CS bindersIn 1986 I copied out the recipe for Old Fashioned Buttermilk Biscuits , which on their flip side  went by the alias

“Southern Raised Biscuits”

1 cup buttermilk

4 cups AP flour

2 teaspoons baking powder

1 tsp salt

1 pkg active dry yeast

1/2 cup warm water

2 Tbl sugar

1/3 cup shortening (I now use butter)

2 Tbl butter, melted

  1. Heat the buttermilk in a small pan until bubbles form around the edges – it will curdle. Cool to lukewarm

  2. Grease 2 large cookie sheets

  3. Sift the flour with the baking powder and salt into a large bowl.

  4. Sprinkle the yeast over the warm water in a small bowl. Add he sugar and stir to dissolve completely. Stir this into the lukewarm buttermilk.

  5. Cut the shortening into he flour with a pastry blender or 2 knives until mixture resembles course corn meal.

  6. Make a well in the center and add the buttermilk mixture all at once. Stir in with a fork to mix well.

  7. Dough will be stiff. Turn out to floured board and knead until smooth – about 5 minutes.

  8. Using a rolling pin, roll our from the center to 1/2 thickness.  With floured cutter (or sharp knife) cut into 2″ biscuits (I like square ones).

  9. Place biscuits on prepared cookie sheet 1 inch apart.

  10. Prick the tops with a fork  1,2, 3 .

  11. Cover them with a towel and let them rise about 1/2 an hour., until their about 1 ” high

  12. Preheat the oven to 400°

  13. Before baking brush tops with melted butter

  14. Bake biscuits 10-12 minutes or until golden brown.

  15. Serve warm, with butter and honey…..makes about 30 biscuits.

McCalls Cooking School Old Fashioned Buttermilk Biscuits Breads4.

These are not the only biscuits….my favorite quick and easy biscuit is made with Bakewell Cream.

bakewell cream imageWhat is Bakewell Cream?

Bakewell Cream is a variety of baking powder developed by Bangor, Maine chemist Byron H. Smith in response to a shortage of cream of tartar in the U.S. during World War II. It is sold throughout the U.S., but is most popular in the state of Maine.

It sure does make a nice biscuit. But buying a can is now a commitment to biscuits – I’d hate to have throw any away. It’s available through King Arthur Flour, but I’ve also picked it up in the baking section of my local Stop & Shop.

Bakewell Cream Biscuits

4 c. flour
4 tsp. Bakewell Cream
2 tsp. soda
1 tsp. salt
1/2 c. shortening ( I use butter)
1 1/2 c. milk
  1. Preheat oven to 475°.
  2. Light grease 2 cookie sheets (or use parchment)
  3. Mix together with a whisk the flour, Bakewell Cream, baking soda, and salt.
  4. Cut in with a pastry blender or 2 knives the shortening or butter until it resembles cornmeal
  5. Add in the milk to a well in the center all at once.and mix together with a fork. You really want to combine the ingredients, you don’t want to really mix and create lots of gluten strands. Light biscuits have undeveloped gluten! Mixing makes biscuits tough.
  6. Pat out to a floured board. With a rolling pin, start in the center and roll outward so that it’s 1/2 inch thick.
  7. Cut biscuits with floured cutter or a sharp knife – I like square biscuits, no re-rolling scraps.
  8. Put about 1 inch apart on the cookie sheets.
  9. Put the biscuits in the hot oven and turn the timer on for 5 minutes.
  10. At the 5 minute mark turn off the oven and leave the biscuits in for another 5-10 minutes until golden and lovely.
  11. Serve hot with butter and honey.

ALSO – You can freeze the unbaked biscuits you might not be using right away….mix, shape and freeze. Bake them from the frozen state, 8 minutes instead of 5.

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Filed under Recipe, The 1980's

Marinated Mushrooms

Mushrooms have been marked down and featured right at the front of the store lately, and I don’t I just love a bargain…..

And I love Mushrooms..

fungi,mushroom, white Champignons_Agaricus

con fungi,

Mushroom sauce...great on pasta

Mushroom sauce…great on pasta – I don’t think I’ve shared this yet…coming attraction – or warning!

musi di fungi  – that is more or less ‘mushroom mouth’  – Lois Henrickson pretty much rocks this

Lois Henrickson HBO Big Love

Lois Henrickson HBO Big Love

And I know in the world there are mushroom people and Not mushroom people

OK, I didn’t learn that in the world, I learned it at home. My family is divided between mushroom people and Not mushroom people – just like the olives divide the room to the olives and the pits….

Someone had asked me for a pickled mushroom recipe recently, but I couldn’t find it because it was hiding in plain sight.

Why did I ever think writing things down and then trimming the paper exactly around it was any sort of plan?

Was there a great paper shortage in the ’80’s that has somehow escaped memory?

The paper it was on

  1. Had been trimmed exactly around all the writing, back and front
  2. Was 2 inches by 4 inches
  3. Had another recipe written on the back (labeled ‘SW/SU Meatballs‘, it’s a variation of the famous jar of grape jelly/bottle of chili/cocktail sauce that also includes a can of cranberry jelly…..and calls for 3 pounds of meat, so this is a a party dish)
  4. Had the name ‘Marinated Mushrooms’  on the bottom and not on the top, making it hard to find.
  5. AND  – The directions were so  – where is the place that’s before vague that is even further from clear? That is the place where this recipe is standing.  So I had to check out other marinated mushrooms/pickled mushrooms.It actually made more sense after that; it still had some ‘splaining to do.

And what else did I find in my studies?

There are more Nonna Marinated mushrooms stories out there then you could shake a stick at.

And they vary – from pouring a vinaigrette over the mushrooms, to cooking the mushrooms in lots of vinegar or wine . This recipe has you cook the mushrooms first and then pickle them. All good.

Marinated Mushrooms

2 # mushrooms – we always used the little button ‘shrooms from the grocery story , because back in the day there wasn’t a variety option – anything sturdy. And no collecting your own unless you really know from mushrooms!

1 cup water

1/2 cup vinegar

2 tsp lemon juice

dash of pepper

1/4 teaspoon salt

1 bay leaf

3 TBL oil

  1. Wash and trim  mushrooms.
  2. Put them in a pan, cover with water. Bring to a boil and boil for 10 minutes.
  3. Drain and cool. Keep them in a colander so they can keep draining.
  4. Boil together 1 cup water, the vinegar, lemon juice,pepper and salt and the bay leaf.
  5. Add the cooked mushrooms to the hot mixture.
  6. When it cools, strain it and add the oil.
  7. They will be ready after 24 hours.
  8. Will keep for 2 weeks in a covered jar…so they say, they never last that long. Marinated Mushrooms are A wholly approved and suitable use for a Mason Jar.

mason jarsThis recipe is just a written down version of how I remember doing this. I don’t even remember who told me how . It was always good to have some for the holidays. Or parties. Or any other time that called for nibbles or antipasto. Or because mushrooms were on sale. And because it’s Spring – at 33 degrees and it snowed yesterday.

We used to reuse just any old jar that had a lid...we all survived, but I buy Mason jars and new lids for them now, for the the things that aren't just leftovers,,

We used to reuse just any old jar that had a lid…we all survived, but I buy Mason jars and new lids for them now, for the the things that aren’t just leftovers.

Speaking of Mushroom People..

The full movie is on YouTube

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Filed under Italian, Recipe, The 1980's

Oatmeal Raisin Cookies

And sometimes, especially with 4 brothers, you just need quick and easy cheap eats from what you have on hand. Hence, the traditional inclusion of Oatmeal Raisin Cookies.  I’m pretty sure that this recipe came from the box…if not the oatmeal box, then the raisin box.

By the way, why are oatmeal boxes ROUND???Quaker oats boxalthough the round box is good for crafts….

an organizer....if I used this for my loose recipes...first, eat lots of oatmeal

an organizer….if I used this for my loose recipes…first, eat lots of oatmeal

oatmeal box drum

The ever popular drum – for a little drummer boy, no doubt

Oatmeal Raisin Cookies

3 C flour

1 C gran sugar

2 C brown sugar

2 C butter

2 tsp vanilla

6 C old-fashioned rolled oats (not quick, not instant, not steel cut or Irish)

2 tsp baking soda

2 C raisins

4 eggs

Have been using this since sometime in the ‘80’s – that’s the whole thing. I’m pretty sure that this is a double batch, at least. It make a TON of cookies. You know what to do from here. 350 or 375 for 7-12 minutes. Less time for a softer cookies, a little longer for a crisper cookie.

Did they put recipes on the back of the oatmeal box? We didn’t search for it, was out there.

oatmeal raisin' cookies Scott Metzger

 

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Filed under Christmas, The 1980's

Advent is today

Advent marks the beginning of the Christmas Season.

Let the cookie baking begin!

First up is a cookie, so easy….it began with the McCalls Cooking School.McCalls Cooking schoolWe got this recipe in 1985, and immediately began tinkering with it.  Chocolate coconut macaroons are just TOO close to an Almond Joy to not keep going. almond joy barWe tried putting whole and halved almonds on top, but they baked off or got too hard.

Then we put the almond bits in.. and a little almond extract. Make them now, and then buy more sweetened flaked coconut and sweetened condensed milk and then you can make more later. Oh, Joy!

Oh, Joy! Chocolate Coconut Macaroons with Almonds

1 can (14 oz) sweetened, condensed milk (not evaporated milk)

3 squares (1 oz each) unsweetened chocolate

Dash of salt

2 cans (3 ½ oz size) or 1 package (7 oz) sweetened flaked coconut (do not use shredded coconut)

¼ cup slivered almonds

1 teaspoon almond extract

 

  1. Preheat oven to 350°
  2. Cover a baking sheet pan with foil and grease generously OR cover a baking sheet with no stick foil OR line a baking sheet with a silpat
  3. Put condensed milk, chocolate and salt in the top of a double boiler.
  4. Put over boiling water until chocolate melts and the mixture is thick and smooth
  5. Remove from the from over the boiling water and add coconut, almonds and almond extract and mi well with a wooden spoon.
  6. Drop mixture by rounded tablespoonfuls on the prepared sheet, 1 inch apart.
  7. Bake for 8-10 minutes or until cookies are set.
  8. Remove from baking sheet with a metal spatula and cool on a wire rack.

Yield: about 2 dozen macaroons.

Adapted from McCall’s Cooking School. Cakes,Cookies #40. 1985.

choccoconut macaroon

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Filed under Christmas, Holiday, Recipe, The 1980's

Throwback Thursday

me 1981 Joe Carlin

This was when I was a new Pilgrim…..shades of 1981. This was the second oven that we had built at Plimoth Plantation.

 

 

 

15th century mobile oven...great looking pies there, too.

15th century mobile oven…great looking pies there, too.

Millet TIme - Woman Baking Bread, 1854 - not much changes....

Millet TIme – Woman Baking Bread, 1854 – not much changes….

A newer oven at Plimoth - a clome or cloam oven

A newer old type oven at Plimoth – a clome or cloam oven in  2012

 

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Filed under Bread, The 17th century, The 1980's

STOP – Drop, don’t roll

Biscuits, that is.

Stop Drop and Roll is still great advice near a FIRE, but biscuits are less intimidating and are quicker and easier if you make drop biscuits instead of cut kind.

pillsbury biscuit

Easy. Quick. Smell great in the oven. Eaten so fast, often with butter or honey, that you don’t notice the taste is lacking. It’s the chemical aftertaste that reminds you you have other options.

Drop biscuits move you past the biscuit perfection issues  and into the wide world of biscuit much more gently.  Instead of rolling the biscuits, which then need to be cut , you make the dough  a little more like batter and drop it by spoonfuls – or scoopfuls – onto the baking sheet and just pop it into a preheated oven. Having the oven good and hot is one way to make a better biscuit.

Parmesan Drop Biscuits

2 cups AP flour

Grated Parmesan cheese

bakewell cream

It really does make the biscuits higher and lighter – heavenly

1 Tablespoon double acting baking powder (or Bakewell Cream, my fave)

½ teaspoon salt

½ stick butter (1/4 cup)

1 cup of milk

  1. Sift the flour into a mixing bowl with the baking powder and salt.
  2. Mix in the grated cheese
  3. Using your finger OR 2 knives OR a heavy fork OR a biscuit mixer (ill)blend the flour and butter together into fine particles
  4. Add the milk and stir the dough just enough to gather it all together. Don’t over mix at this point or you’ll get tough, rugged, more like hockey pucks than biscuits, biscuits.
  5. Drop by spoonfuls on an ungreased cookie sheet.
  6. Bake in a preheated 450° oven for 12-15 minutes
  7. Serve hot
  8. Makes about 12 biscuits.

 

James Beard. Beard On Bread. p. 160-1.beard on bread

 

Easy-peasy.

stop sign drop

for when it’s not about biscuits

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Filed under Autumn, Bread, Recipe, The 1980's