Category Archives: Summer

Salad Daze

It’s August.

Too hot even for toast.

Salad.

Easy salad.

Take a bunch of fresh things, of the leafy/ veggie/ fruit sort.

Spinach_leaves

Wash.

Pick. Peel. Seeding optional.

Add a Protein:

  • hard boiled egg
  • cheese
  • bacon
  • sliced meat
  • nuts

Greens – pick, wash, chop or otherwise make small enough to fit on a fork and into your mouth. WHY are so many salads with leaves bigger then the bowl?

Fresh herbs – easy flavor add.

Dress. From a bottle or olive oil and vinegar, salt and pepper . A little mustard makes it nice.

Maybe a carb layer – croutons/a little cold macaronis/leftover rice.

Meal in a bowl.

SdeWarburgSalad

The moshav (agricultural village) of Sde Warburg, Israel, holds the Guinness World Record for the largest lettuce salad, weighing 10,260 kg (11.3 short tons). The event, held on 10 November 2007.

There is a song or two titled Salad Days….

BUT

This is way cool

 

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Filed under Eating, Recipe, Summer

Lammas or Loaf Mass

Van Gogh, Haystacks in Provence, June 1888. Oil on canvas, 73 x 92.5 cm. Kröller-Müller Museum, Otterlo.

Harvest time!

The First of August is also known as Lammas or Loaf Mass, to celebrate the harvest.

Van Gogh, Haystacks in Provence, June 1888. Oil on canvas, 73 x 92.5 cm. Kröller-Müller Museum, Otterlo.

Haystacks

1/2 cup chips – butterscotch or peanut butter have the most haystack look – white white chocolate or regular ole chocolate chips are fine, too

1/4 cup peanut butter (creamy)

1 cup chow mein noodles

  1. Melt the chips.
  2. Mix in the peanut butter
  3. Mix in the chow mein noodles – a silicone spatula is great here
  4. Drop by stack looking spoonfuls into stacks on wax paper.
  5. Let cool and then eat (bonus points for pretending to be a cow….)
  6. Store in the fridge.
  • from assorted backs of bags and boxes, trial and error, and mostly indecipherable scribbles on little bits of paper

 

chow mein noodlecan

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Filed under Bread, Summer

Summer in the Seaside

A breath of salt air.

The windows are open to catch the morning breeze….

Ah, the Sounds of a peaceful seaside town!

In the distance, mallards quack on the brook.

Mallard_speculum

 

A gull caws overhead, then another

Why are seagulls at the sea?

 Because if they were at they at the bay, they’d be

BAYGULLS

Yet another gull, answers these two, laughing…….

Laughing_gull_-_natures_pics

Laughing Gull Leucophaeus atricilla

 

 

A garbage truck. Backing up. Beeping for Safety’s Sake.

And then……

The Lawn Mower

The Hedge Trimmer

The Weed Wacker

The Leaf Blower

The sound of an aluminum extension ladder going up, up, up.

A Nail Gun

Buzz Saw.

Motorcycles

2-4-6-78!

Many Harleys, a handful of three-wheelers.

2015-harley-davidson-freewheeler-trike-makes-appearance-photo-gallery_3

A car goes by, top down, music UP.

 

Sleeping in is futile……

 

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Filed under New England, Summer

Van Gogh – The End

 

Wheat-Field-with-Crows Vincent van Gogh July 1890 last

A painting from the last days of Vincent’s life

This is the day, in 1890, that Vincent Van Gogh died. His cause of death is often stated as a suicide, but the evidence is/was far from conclusive.

Van Gogh The Life

According to Steven Naifeh and Gregory White Smith, the authors of

Van Gogh: The Life  

Vincent  very well have been murdered. Naifeh and Smith make a very compelling case and their book is meticulously, thoroughly and lovingly researched. A long read but never a slog.

Tree-Roots-and-Trunks Vincent van GoghJuly 1890

Tree Roots and Trunks
Vincent van Gogh
Painting, Oil on Canvas
Auvers-sur-Oise: July, 1890
Van Gogh Museum
             another painting from Vincent’s last days

 

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Filed under Books, Perception ways, Summer

Flipping, Flapping, Frapping

Flip-flops.

The Sound of summer includes the sound of flip flops.

Flip-flop. Flip-flop. Flip-flop.

Even in places where flip flops aren’t the best choice. Like anyplace that isn’t a beach.

You can hear them coming. And going. Without looking at feet, you know what’s on them.

Flip-flop.

Havaianas_Tradicional

 

So while the girl was asking, “Have you ever heard of a drink called…..a flap?” I was hearing flip-flops.

I asked her if she meant

“Frappe”

And she smiled real big and said, Yes, THAT’S it!” and her sister got closer, and her Mom and there were others and it was hard to tell who was together-together and who was just together as in there in the moment together.

frappe Photograph by Kang Kim, Prop Styling by Lauren Evans, Styling by Karen EvansApostrophe

FRAPPES    photograph by Kang Kim, Prop Styling by Lauren Evans, Styling by Karen Evans/Apostrophe

So I describe how a frappe was a milkshake with ice cream, and if they ordered a milkshake ‘round these parts, they were likely to get shook milk, no ice cream.

Her sister asked, “But where’s the

RUM?”

Flip-flop. Flip-flop. Flip-flop.

The_Pirates_carrying_rum_on_shore_to_purchase_slaves

Yo

 

Both girls were under the age of 12 so rum drinks weren’t what I first thought of when this line of questioning began, and then I remembered….

FLIP?

Are you asking about Flip?

Now everyone was smiling and nodding….

Now, thanks to Paula Marcoux I know from flip.

flip_Paula_01

Beer, rum, molasses, hot poker, done.

 

 

I know oodles of other things from her, too, but flip and rum had come up recently, and put her in my thoughts, and memories of flips past…. in the way rum drinks do here in New England. It’s not exactly flip season here, with temperatures and humidity both in the high ‘80’s, but no season is truly far from another here in New England, so soon enough it will be flip appropriate time.

rum5FlipTools

illustration fro Rum: A Global History

I had recently been flipping through Mrs. Child’s (Lydia Maria, not Julia) “American Frugal Housewife”, the way one does in the food history biz.

Frugal hs 2nd ed cover

I was (and still am) wrestling with the differences/different-name-for-the-same-thing conundrum between flapjacks, slapjacks and flatjacks. In short, sorting out the Jack branch of the fritter family.

Which started with Johnnycake and Hoe Cake, and is detouring through Pancake, with short stops in Griddle Cake, Mush Cake and Corn Cake……

While looking at pancakes, and I saw this:

Pancakes

“…A spoonful or two of N.E. rum makes pancakes light. Flip makes very nice pancakes. In this case, nothing is done but to sweeten your mug of beer with molasses; put in one glass of N.E. rum; heat it till it foams, by putting in a hot poker; and stir it up with flour as thick as other pancakes.”

  • Child, Mrs. The American Frugal Housewife, 12th Boston: Carter, Hendee and Co. 1832. Reprinted 1980. p. 74.

Paula’s has directions for flip (with a photo step by step) in Cooking With Fire. And she has notes on these pancakes in the appendix, where she recommends adding a pinch of salt and an egg. And cook them in bacon grease. All good.

Cooking with fire

I’m still thinking about rum in pancakes……with blueberry pancakes and cinnamon? With rum butter? Are these supper pancakes rather than breakfast pancakes?

So I told the girls about flip pancakes, too.

And then I wondered – what sort of New England Colonial Educational Experience was this family on that involved Flip? Cause that’s the field trip that I want to go on.

 

RumGlobal History

I have more RUM books then I thought – all that Living Proof at Plimoth Plantation

 

 

 

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Filed under Books, New England, Perception ways, Summer

National Corn Fritter Day

Everything has a day…..even

 Corn Fritters

Today!

Corn Fritters

1 can corn 2 teaspoons salt
1 cup flour 1/4 teaspoon paprika
1 teaspoon baking powder 2 eggs

Chop corn, drain, and add dry ingredients mixed and sifted, then add yolks of eggs, beaten until thick, and fold in whites of eggs beaten stiff. Cook in a frying-pan in fresh hot lard. Drain on paper.

Farmer, Fannie Merritt. The Boston Cooking-School Cook Book. Boston: Little, Brown, 1918; Bartleby.com, 2000. www.bartleby.com/87/.

Fannie Farmer 1918 11thed

And Corn Fritters have

aliases.

Why??? Why, are they ashamed of being corn? Or is the fritter part too frivolous? Do they just want to be taken more seriously?  Or is it role-playing, cos-play for fritters??

They are also known as….

Corn Oysters

CORN OYSTERS

        Mix well together one quart grated sweet corn, two tea-cups sweet milk, one tea-cup flour, one tea-spoon butter, two eggs well beaten; season with pepper and salt, and fry in butter like griddlecakes. – Mrs. H. B. S.

-1877. Buckeye Cookery and Practical Housekeeping. p.35.

Buckeye 1877

OysterBed(1)

Eastern Oysters

They do not taste particularly oystery, these fritters of CORN. They taste fried, like the fried part of a fried oyster, but only someone who has never had an oyster, or never been near an oyster or had ever spent any amount of time imagining oysters would be fooled.

And why fool them? Why the charade? Why the name change? Why Mock Oysters?

Crassostrea_gigas_p1040847

Pacific Oyster

Mock Oysters

MOCK OYSTERS OF CORN.

Take a dozen and a half ears of large young corn, and grate all the grains off the cob as fine as possible. Mix with the grated corn three large table-spoonfuls of sifted flour, the yolks of six eggs well beaten. Let all be well incorporated by hard beating.

Have ready in a frying-pan an equal proportion of lard and fresh butter. Hold it over the fire till it is boiling hot, and then put in a portion of the mixture as nearly as possible in shape and size like fried oysters. Fry them brown, and send them to the table hot. They should be near an inch thick.

This is an excellent relish at breakfast, and may be introduced as a side dish at dinner. In taste it has a singular resemblance to fried oysters. The corn must be young.

  • Miss Leslie’s Directions for Cookery. p. 193.

Leslie cookery 1851

They can try hard, but they ain’t no oyster.

And what’s so wrong with being the corn fritter?

Corn fritters are pretty awesome.

Corn

Batter

Butter

Fried

A little salt

All Good.

 

 

 

 

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Filed under Eating, Fish, New England, Recipe, Summer

Fourth of July Menu, Early 20th Century

The 45 star flag of 1901.(banner)

WhiteHouseCookBook001

The White House Cook Book was first released in 1894, and was updated regularly.

TO THE

WIVES OF OUR PRESIDENTS,

THOSE NOBLE WOMEN WHO HAVE GRACED THE

WHITE HOUSE

DEAR TO ALL AMERICANS,

THIS VOLUME

IS AFFECTIONATELY DEDICATED

BY THE AUTHOR.

In between the recipes and household hints there are portraits of the first ladies…..all of them up to 1900 in this 1901 edition.

There are also menus for the whole  year, of breakfast, dinner, and supper suggestions for each day of a week for each month of the year, as well as special whole day holiday menus.

New Year’s Day has a menu, as does Washington’s Birthday (which includes Washington Pie for dinner, but also English Pound Cake for supper…)

July begins with a

TR flag 1901

FOURTH OF JULY.

BREAKFAST.

Red Raspberries and Cream

Fried Chicken 86.   Scrambled Tomatoes 196.

Warmed Potatoes 186.     Tennessee Muffins 245.

Toast 268.

Coffee 487.

DINNER.

Clam Soup 46.

Boiled Cod 68., with Lobster Sauce 150.

Roast Lamb 136. With Mint Sauce 152.

New Potatoes Boiled 183.

Green Peas 201.    Spinach with Eggs 202.

Cucumbers Sliced 167

Chicken Patties 85

Naple Biscuits 343.  Vanilla Ice-cream 357.

Chocolate Macaroons 358.   Strawberries.

Coffee 437.

 

SUPPER.

Cold Sliced Lamb 134.

Crab Pie 69. Water-cress Salad 168. Cheese Toast 264.

Graham Bread 234.  Sponge Cake 277.

Blackberries. Tea 439.

 

p. 468 White House CB

I was interested to see Green Peas and New Potatoes for the Fourth, as well as Boiled Cod with Lobster Sauce, even though it’s not quite Poached Salmon and Egg Sauce…..

But wait –

are those

MACAROONS

for dessert at dinner?????

Macaroons again? You spend some time with a recipes, and it turns up EVERYWHERE

Although this time in chocolate….

Chocolate Macaroons

PUT three ounces of plain chocolate in a pan and melt on a slow fire; then work it to a thick paste with one pound of powdered sugar and the whites of three eggs; roll the mixture down to the thickness of about one-quarter of an inch; cut it in small, round pieces with a paste-cutter, either plain or scalloped; butter a pan slightly, and dust it with flour and sugar in equal quantities; place in it the pieces of paste or mixture, and bake in a hot but not too quick oven.

  1. Ziemann, Hugo and Mrs. F. L. Gillette. The White House Cook Book. The Saalfield Publishing Co.: New York-Akron-Chicago. p. 353.

45starflag

Can you name the five states that joined the Union in the 20th century?

Talk amongst yourselves…..

Happy Fourth!

 

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Filed under Holiday, New England, Recipe, Summer, Wicked Wayback

Lapin lapin lapin

Flemish Giant rabbits

Sandy_flemish_with_boy

French Lop rabbits

Loprabbit

Rabbit Champagne d’argente

Lapin_argenté

 

 

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When Corn Salad is not Corn Salad

Valerianella locusta illustration by Thomé (1885) showing the plant, flower, and seed.

There is plant called

corn salad

Ackersalat02

Which is not the same thing as a

corn salad

Corn_&_Beans_(15392776377).jpg

See?

Not the same thing at all.

Corn Salad also goes by Mache, Doucette and Raiponce …yes, that translates to Rapunzel!

Fairy_Tales_From_The_Brothers_Grimm_Rapunzel_3_By_Walter_Crane

Walter Crane illustration of the Brothers Grimm fairy tale. Was she so named because her hair grew like a weed?

Evidently, it’s called corn salad because it’s a weed in the corn – which is any grain back in England. People use to gather it in from the fields,  and not actually grow it in their gardens. Ordinary people, that is.

Thomas Jefferson grew it in his gardens at Monticello.

Official_Presidential_portrait_of_Thomas_Jefferson_(by_Rembrandt_Peale,_1800)

Thomas Jefferson – not ordinary

Louis XIV also grew it in his garden

Louis_XIV_of_France

Louis XIV – the Sun King – very NOT ordinary!

I’m really tired of KALE

kale

So perhaps Corn Salad – or Mache or Doucette or rapunzel  could be next Arugula…

rocket

 

 

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Filed under Summer

Just fine

Van Gogh, Seascape near Les Saintes-Maries-de-la-Mer, June 1888. Oil on canvas, 50.5 x 64.3 cm. Van Gogh Museum, Amsterdam

Van Gogh, Seascape near Les Saintes-Maries-de-la-Mer, June 1888. Oil on canvas, 50.5 x 64.3 cm. Van Gogh Museum, Amsterdam

First day of Summer.

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Filed under Summer