Category Archives: Soup

Soup kitchen

detail from Johann Georg Sturm’s 1796 Deutschlands Flora in Abbildungen

Soooooo….

When you realize that you have six pounds of parsnips, and the odd roast turkey carcass and the freezer needs defrosting (because the freezer is old enough to be NOT frost-free) and the weather is also not frost-free….time to make some soup.

You work in a kitchen, sometimes you make soup.

Soup Kitchen.

I’ve had some great soup gurus – early on Anna Thomas…

anna-thomas-2016

Anna Thomas

love-soup

I started with the soup basics in Vegetarian Epicure…This is only soups.

There are also the ethnic soups that are shades of my childhood, what we ate and what we talked about…

soups-of-italy

I’ve mentioned this before..still a page turner

Barbara Kafka has a soup book called, “Soup : A Way of Life”.

soup-babara-kafta

Not to be confused with

kafkas-soup

But I digress….

 

But most of the time I make soup by assembling the likely ingredients – in some cases the Most Likely ingredients – and then think about how they go together, and what needs to be added to make them one soup and not a bunch of leftovers.The soupness helps to bring things together, but the right accent can make things great.

There’s also the internet …..

Most of the parsnip soup recipes called for milk or cream, and there are allergy issues with dairy AND it would mean a trip to the store….and  wants to go to the store for ONE THING? And who comes back from the store with one thing?????.

But the internet had quite a few vegan veggie soups, many of which included cashews, which bring up nut issues   ….but also, I had NO cashews and then I would have to go to the store for one thing….back to that.

Then there were a raft  of soup recipes where the roots were roasted and pureed.

Roasting, easy-peasy.

Pureeing….there’s no blender in the kitchen, but boiling the roasted roots in broth makes mashing a really possibility.

Parsnips are peeled and cut. The better part of a head of garlic, peeled. All the veggies tossed with some olive oil, salt and pepper. Put in a hot oven til fork tender, 350° oven about an hour, fork very tender.

Cool and save.

Soup Day morning, add 5 quarts broth made from the turkey carcass and a big sprig of rosemary. Bring to a boil.

Simmer for an hour, mash the parsnips to thicken it up. Taste and adjust seasonings.  Bring to a bowl.

Makes 15 servings.

parsnips-1

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Filed under Eating, Influencers, Soup, winter

Bright Lights/Big City

I had a dinner adventure set for the City. (By ‘the City’ I mean Boston).

One friend I knew, two new friends to meet.

It came together surprisingly easy – a couple of e-mails and we had a day, a time and a place.

Too easy.

Sooooo

I google a map, get on a bus and go.

Which is about when the plans started to unravel.

But I won’t know this for a while.

Not everyone has my cell phone number – and I have an old fashioned NOT-smart phone.

flip phone

flip, not smart….

No Facebook,

facebook

no Twitter

twitterimage

no e-mail….

email

Just phone…..

I got to the restaurant early….natch

They let me sit at the Lounge and served me water.

When I asked about the reservation for four at seven, they said:

We have no such reservation

Hmmmmmmm……..

Just then, my phone rings.

It’s the friend of my friend and I can’t hear a word she’s saying because  a police motorcycle goes by, sirens and lights. Then a police cruiser, also all sirens and lights. Followed by a fire truck and and then an ambulance…..

fire truck lights

Sooo – friend of friend will be right there – there’s been a last minute change of plans…..

As I wait I realize I don’t know exactly what she looks like….did I mention I’m in

THE CITY?!?!

I’m in the City, waiting for someone I don’t actually know. I’m getting really hungry now, too. Should I go  back to the South Station, grab a bite and get on the next bus out of town?

But who’s that? Friendly, quizzical…..could this be friendly friend of friend?

Two minutes later I have a new friend.

We walk down the street, stop at a place with tables on the sidewalk, talk and talk,  order:

Chicken Meatballs with tomato vinaigrette, garlic cream and pine nuts; Artichoke and Bacon flatbread with lemon-thyme ricotta and parmesan; Fried Soft Shell Crab with lemon-herb fromage blanc and frisee ; Falafel Pancakes with tzatziki, serrano and scallion  (falafel AND a pancake – Yes, please!),

eat, talk, laugh, talk, talk, talk, laugh……and in the end she offered me all the leftovers.

Yes, please and Thank-you!

Especially the  Roasted Cauliflower with beet hummus, pine nuts and golden raisins.

Time out for teachable moment:

 

  1.  Why are some golden raisins called sultanas?
    1. Golden raisins are made from WHITE GRAPES (DUH). Kishmish is another name for them made from  a  variety of large white grape.  We almost definitely had Kishmish because they were HUGE. Sultanas may be so named because they were originally from the Ottoman Empire.
Thompson_seedless_grapes

White grapes make lighter raisins.

And now on to Cauliflower.

Cauliflower

The first time that I roasted cauliflower, oh so many years ago,  it was for a soup. I had roasted the cauliflower  and as it cooled my son and I ate almost all of it. I wrote a note on the recipe to roast 2 cauliflower when making the soup…because we’d eat one before  soup. This winter, cauliflower has been so trendy that I never made snag of one at the mark-down bin.

caulifower who;le roast NYT

The New York Times had a Whole Roasted Cauliflower story and suddenly cauliflower is trendy.

At one point this winter, between the roasting trend and the drought in Cali,  cauliflower  were very pricey, indeed. The whole point of the cauliflower is it’s very not pricey-ness. Like it’s cousins, cabbages and collards, it’s meant to feed the masses. The hungry masses.People like ME!

When Cauliflower was common,. we ate a lot of it.

Botanical-Cauliflower-Italian-780x990

I had not one, but TWO ulterior motives for the leftovers.

Motive the first – find the roasted cauliflower soup recipe and make a single serve batch…

Motive the second – bring in the rest and create a little Lunch Envy.

Come lunch, I unpack ,

why THIS? Falafel pancakes???? mmmmmnom, and oh, yes, soft shell crab.……nomnomnommmmmm…

Then I am undone by homemade sauce and homemade meatballs and homemade garlic buns, which made the room smell divine as they re-heated in the toaster oven.

Karma got me good.

When I got home I couldn’t find the soup recipe, so I ate the leftover cauliflower pretty much as it was. Which was pretty darn good.

So there are days when plans can be made and plans can be undone and it’s still all good.

And there are plans for another night in the City.

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#FathersDay

Twitter_bird_logo_2012.svg

Guess what’s trending on Twitter today?

#FathersDay

That’s the Twitter world way of saying Father’s Day.

Who saw THAT coming?

One of the other trends is #dadswhocook.

I can not write that story. Mine was not a cooking Dad.

Mine was Campbell’s Chicken Noodle Soup straight from the can to the pan Dad.

Campbells ChicNoodle

That little golden seal mentions a Paris Exhibition – Campbell’s was gourmet? Soup IS good food – for thought.

The CONDENSED soup straight from the can to the pan without the water. Which he served to us without malice or understanding why we thought we were being poisoned.

And yet he knew from food.

He missed a calling as a critic.

Not critical, like,

“You call THESE mashed potatoes? Not lumps of library paste?”

But critical like Pete Wells of the New York Times critic of food

pete-wells-qsHe could analyze taste and texture and technique and make suggestions about how to change things around for next time, how to think with the end in mind, how to have opinions.

A trait that we his children all share. (Best Meal EVAH : October 19, 1986)

A trait that has been my bread and butter in more ways then one, and like blue eyes and curly hair, another way that this apple hasn’t fallen far from that tree.

Happy#FathersDay

apple tree with apples underneath

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Filed under Holiday, Influencers, Irish, Soup

Chicken Once, Chicken Twice

Chicken Soup is Nice!

chickensoupsendakJan

Thank you, Maurice Sendak!

Chicken soup is also an easy (and cheap….I mean economical and low waste) way to have the same chicken twice. Feel free to eat as much of the meat as you’d like.

First – you need chicken with bones in it. Don’t eat the bones – they’re the part that’s needed for making the broth.

Easiest Chicken Broth EVAH

1 roasted chicken (it could even been the Friday special rotisserie chicken form the grocery store.)

some/all or none of the following:

a sad little carrot or 2

an onion – left whole, with maybe a clove or two in it. This could be a sad little excuse of an onion….

leafy tops from some celery or a limp (more sadness) stalk or two

parsley stems that you’ve carefully saved in the freezer from previous parsley events

a lemon ….in short, look in the corners of the fridge and find the sad, the limp, the forlorn, the orphaned and rinse them and toss them in the slowcooker.

water

salt and pepper

maybe a tablespoon or so of wine or vinegar if there is no lemon

  1. Rinse off the vegetative matter and put in the bottom of the slow cooker.
  2. Pick the meat off the bone of the chicken and put aside. Don’t worry – you don’t have to be too careful about this.
  3. Put the bones, the leftover skin, any of the jelly in the pan on top of the vegetable bits.
  4. Add 3-4 Quarts water, until the slow cooker is full and everything is under water.
  5. Add the vinegar or wine – this helps get all the goodness out of the bones. Depending on how the chicken was cooked originally add some salt and or pepper now.
  6. Cover and let cook 6-8 hours.
  7. Uncover, cool, strain and voila! Broth.
  8. Makes about 2 Quarts broth.

partly adapted from Italian Slow Cooker ….Italian slow cooker book

and years of lazy experience.

Now, if you don’t have a slow cooker, you can use a heavy bottom soup pot, bring it to a boil and keep it at a low simmer again, 6, 7, 8 hours and then strain, season, use.

And if you want to start with your own chicken, here’s Grandma B’s Chicken Soup with Dumplings

CHICKEN SOUP & DUMPLINGS

1 stewing hen & water to cover

1 large onion (whole)

Several outside stalks of celery-Tied

Salt and Pepper- (I use pepper corns 6 or 8)

  1. Cut up chicken place in soup POT – or leave whole
  2. Fill POT WITH WATER
  3. ADD whole onion & celery stalks
  4. Add 1 tsp salt for each 3# of chicken
  5. Add pepper corn
  6. Cook – until chicken is tender.

Take chicken out & debone – if desired

  1. You can add cut up carrots & celery.
  2. Add dumplings to boiling STOCK by teaspoon into soup.
  3. While dumplings cook – debone chicken to be returned to POT.

DUMPLINGS – Mother called them sinkers they are hard

5 eggs

½ C cream

1 tsp salt

Flour – stir in enough to make the dough really thick. Then add a couple Tbs of Top broth (2 or 3)

Drop into soup by a teaspoon – cook until they are cooked through.

  • from A Grandma B Recipe Card

    chick rubber

    A rubber chicken just won’t do – but any combination of bony chicken parts will.

 Bone Broth has been in the news lately – even the New York Times has had this  story. One of the people they quote  is Sally Fallon, who was advocating Bone Broth (and real fats!) years ago. I met  her at a conference/meeting of the Weston A. Price Society. I got a copy of Nourishing Traditions, which is a great primer for all sorts of truly natural and traditional foods. I had hoped to finally conquer yoghurt……

Nourishing Traditions Sally Fallon

This book was published in 2003, and I think it was fairly newly out when I was at the conference – which means it was over 10 years ago. How does time fly by like that? Still can’t make yoghurt.

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Making Sunday Soupier

Because I work in a place with a garden, I sometimes score some lovely produce…..like beets.

Great, big, red, big, really large beets.I know that beets aren’t for everyone, and that means…more beets for me!

Beets will keep for quite a while, especially the big ones, especially in the back of the fridge. Although, being these were very large big beets – I’m talking nothing smaller then a pound, most around 2 – pounds, that is – and several checking in at 3 – they were hard to forget and get lost in the back of the dark cold place. I’ve been pulling out the smaller ones, one by one throughout December, but a nice beet soup was defiantly in my future. I’ve long been intrigued by borscht and other sorts of beety soups, maybe since Moosewood Cookbook, which has a vegetarian borscht, variation of which I’ve made in the past.

moosewoodBUT

new year, new recipes and when Bon Appetit had not only a Get Healthy headline and a recipe for Beet Caraway Soup,

Bon Appetit January 2015 New Years Cleanse and Big Batch cooking

Bon Appetit January 2015
New Year Healthy and Big Batch cooking – of BEETS

I had to think, Why don’t I pick up Bon Appetit more often? and Beets AND Big Batch Cooking, I’m soooo in !

Detroit Red  beet from Burpee Seed catalog

Detroit Red beet from Burpee Seed catalog – these are probably fist sized or slightly larger – maybe 1/2 pound a piece. A three pound beet – bigger – cradle in your arm big.

To get to the  Get Healthy  part of the story (with the menus and the shopping list and the pantry list), you have to go to the Bon Appetit website, which 1) isn’t the magazine and 2) has lots of moving parts and is an exercise in (I accidentally wrote ‘stupidity’ instead of ‘futility’, but stupidity isn’t completely wrong) exasperation , because there are links within links and for heaven’s sake, YOU ARE A MAGAZINE, PUT IT ON PAPER. LAYOUT IS IMPORTANT AND POPUPS ARE THE WORK OF THE DEVIL.

I went back more then once, on different days and I may never go back there again, which is a pity because beneath the flash and dazzle jumpiness, which may pass as edgy, but comes off as far to much caffeine, there a a really good recipe data base. Just not for me.

And the Big Batch stuff serves four. FOUR. That’s right, 4. I may not be good with numbers, but 4 is a batch, no big. For Big it should be 6-8 ; a Crowd should serve 8-12, all of which are smaller numbers then what show in my mother’s church cookbook from 1968.

Now I’m remembering why I don’t pick up BA as often as I used to……because we live in very different worlds.

BUT…. to steam-roast a big batch of beets…first, I made the batch bigger.

BIG BATCH STEAM ROASTED BEETS

4-6  pounds beets

2 Tbl olive oil

1 sprig rosemary or several sprigs fresh thyme or 2 bay leaves

1/4 cup water

  1. If the beets are very large (over 1 #) or uneven sizes, peel and cut to make them the same size.If you have a bunch and they’re pretty uniform, wash and trim the tops and tails and you can peel them after. If you have large ones, peel them now. The red will wash off your hands, I promise.
  2. Put them in a large heavy bottom pot/Dutch oven.
  3. Add the oil and toss all around.
  4. Salt and pepper.
  5. Put in the herbs and the water.
  6. Cover tightly.
  7. At this point you can put it in a 425° oven OR
  8. Put it on the stove top on high.
  9. Stir every now and again.You want the roasty/searing thing, not burning – adjust accordingly.
  10. Beets are done when a knife pierces easily – 30-60 minutes depending on the size of the beets and their age (and whether or not it was a dry or wet season when they were growing).
  11. Cool. They’ll keep at least 3 days in a covered container in the fridge. They can be used as is in salads, or in smoothies or soups.

adapted from Bon Appetit January 2015

Now for the soup.

BEET  SOUP with caraway

1 tablespoon olive oil

2 tablespoon caraway seeds

1 medium onion

1 leek

Salt and freshly ground black pepper

2 # cooked beets

2 cups buttermilk, more for serving

cracked pepper (for serving)

  1. Chop the onion and slice the leek.
  2. Heat oil in a large saucepan over medium heat.
  3. Add caraway seeds and cook, stirring, until they start to pop and dance around in the pan, about 1 minute.
  4. Add onion, leek, and a little water to keep seeds from burning; season with salt and pepper.
  5. Cook, stirring occasionally, until onion is soft, 5–7 minutes.
  6. Add beets and 4 cups water to pan.
  7. Bring to a boil, reduce heat, and cook, stirring occasionally, 15–20 minutes.everything should be pretty soft.
  8. Let mixture cool slightly, then purée in a blender in 2 batches, adding 1 cup buttermilk to each batch. Gently heat soup, adding water to adjust consistency if needed. Taste and adjust salt and pepper.
  9. Serve drizzled with buttermilk  and more cracked pepper.

adapted from Bon Appetit Jan 2015

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Another Souper Sunday

It started with a leek….

Well, there’s almost never just one of them….

Leeks in the garden - some are flowering and forming seed heads - this is not the optimal time to harvest them. Looks like August to me. If you plant them in September, you can eat them all winter, you just have to wait for the ground to thaw to harvest them. Or plant them in a hoop house. They grow in the cold, just slowly.

Leeks in the garden – some are flowering and forming seed heads – this is not the optimal time to harvest them. Looks like August to me. If you plant them in September, you can eat them all winter, you just have to wait for the ground to thaw to harvest them. Or plant them in a hoop house. They grow in the cold, just slowly.

except sometimes in a painting

Still Life with Copper Pan - and one leek - Jean-Simeon Chardin - 18th century

Still Life with Copper Pan – and one leek – Jean-Simeon Chardin – 18th century

I had thought to make the bright green leek soup that had been in the New York Times last Wednesday.

leek soup NYT Jan 2015 07KITCH-articleLarge

This just looks so fresh and GREEN…so I went looking for leeks a the Farmer’s Market

I found leeks at the Farmer’s Farmer’s Market, and of course, couldn’t remember anything else that was in the soup…it was fresh spinach, but I’m pretty sure that I didn’t see any of that. Fresh pea shoots, yes, and fresh other greens, but not spinach.

Since the Soups of Italy was still out on the table…and the Ancient Romans ate leeks  or porri I was sure there’d be at least one recipe.

I was surprised that there was this one, that judging from the smudges I have made at least once, that I had no memory of making at all.   And if you can see something in your mind’s eye, can you taste something in your mind’s eye, can you taste something in your mind’s mouth? Anyhow, it looked like it would taste good.

AND

I already had everything on hand – no need to go out in the cold for a grocery run!

This week’s soup:

Minestra di Patate e Porri

Potato and Leek Soup

Ingredienti:


Potatoes – 1-1 ½ #

Leeks – 2 #

Broth – 5-6 cups (or water)

Fettucinne – 6 oz dried/12 oz fresh

Bacon (2 strips smoky), water, butter, oil, celery rib, onion, garlic, sage leaves, freshly grated Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese


Elementi:

Sapori

2 strips smoky bacon

1 # potatoes

1 # leeks

Salt

  1. In large heavy bottom pan, cook the bacon over medium high heat.
  2. Wash, peel and dice the potatoes. (Save the peels for broth making)
  3. Rinse and thinly slice the white and light green parts of the leeks.
  4. When the bacon strips are crispy, remove from the pot and put aside. Add the potato and leeks to the bacon grease and sprinkle with salt.
  5. Mix everything well and then add enough water to cover.
  6. Bring to a simmer, then cover the pot, keeping to a simmer, for 30 minutes. A hard boil is going to make the potatoes pasty, as in wall-paper paste pasty, so keep the heat gentle throughout.
  7. When they are cooled somewhat, puree them before adding them to the soup pot, although I often forget this step and have never regretted it. The potatoes are pretty cooked down and the leeks soft and lovely, and the back of a wooden spoon breaks things down and keeps things interesting at the same time.

Battuto

1 # leeks

1 medium onion

1 celery rib

1 garlic clove

2-4 sage leaves

1 Tbl butter

2 Tbl oil

  1. Rinse well and thinly slice the 2nd pound of leeks, white and light green parts.
  2. Finely dice together the onion, the celery rib, the garlic clove and the sage leaves.
  3. Heat the oil and butter together in a heavy bottom soup pot. Add the leeks and the diced onion, celery, garlic and sage. Give them about 5 minute a few quick stirs until things softens and get fragrant.

Brodo

5-6 cups broth

  1. Add the broth to the pot. Add the cooked potato and leeks to the pot. Stir everything well. Bring to a gentle simmer, and keep partially covered at a simmer for 30 minutes.

Condimenti

6 oz dried fettuccine or 12 oz fresh, cut into 2” pieces

¼ C grated Parmigiano-Reggiano

Cooked bacon, crumbled

  1. Put on a pot of salted water to cook the pasta – OK – reality check –IF you are going to serve and gobble down every last drop of this soup in the next hour or so, by all means, drop your store-boughten boxed dried little noodles bits into the soup and serve away….but IF you went to the bother of making noodles or the expense of buying fresh, take the time and trouble to boil them separately, and IF you’re looking at more soup then will be eaten at one meal and will have a leftover plan, then boil them separately. The combination of long cooked potatoes and cooled down pasta leads to a fairly nasty blob of starchy food-like-stuff by the time it cools down. If on the other hand, you have no interest in flavor or texture, just calories when you eat, I can’t imagine why you’re reading recipes in the first place and there are plenty of cans and containers of things on the grocery store shelves that you can heat in the microwave and eat directly from in less time than it took you to read this far. But it takes all kinds, and there’s room for everyone at the table who will please observe the Clean Hands/Clean Behavior Rule.
  2. Back to the recipe- put a pot of water on to boil, cook the fettuccine al dente, drain well.
  3. Add the fettuccine to the soup.
  4. Serve the soup with the grated cheese and crumbled bacon.

4-6 servings.

Adapted from Minestra di Lasagnette e Porri in Soups of Italy, pp. 170-1.

Soups of Italy

Soups of Italy

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Filed under Italian, Recipe, Soup

Souper Sundays

Since Winter is once more upon us, and Since that means colddddddd weather, and Since Soup is Good Food….

And a pot of soup made on Sunday is lunch and quick supper through the week. Or freezer fodder, to be mined and microwaved at nearly a moment’s notice.

Soups of Italy

Norma Wasserman-Miller Soups of Italy. William Morrow and Co 1998. I’ve had my copy since 2000.

130 soup recipes, each with a story…and sooo many happy endings

Soup for the year round, but I spend the most time with this book in the Winter

Norma writes:

Above all else, soup remains una cucina di casa, “a cuisine of the home.” Indeed, it was the homes and kitchens of so many gracious Italian friends and professional cooks that inspired the recipes and techniques for this book. The numerous recipes I came across had a notable lack of measurements and a heavy reliance on the words in stagione, “in season.” Perhaps this is what I love most about Italian soup cookery – a reliance on simple, good ingredients along with the inventiveness to effortlessly turn them into flavorful soups with character and individuality.

Itroduzione, p. 3.

Norma Wasserman-Miller

Norma Wasserman- Miller . She paints in London now.

Here are the component parts of the soup story:

Battuto – often soffritto – that is the aromatic/ soffritto just means ‘fried’. There are 3 universal solvents – one of them is oil – onions, garlic, celery, fennel, carrots, peppers, even parsley heated in some oil, smells good, tastes, good, this is the base

Sapori – the main ingredients, the big taste.

Brodo – the liquid – don’t overlook water as a broth ; broth, meat or veg  -Water is the second universal solvent…alcohol is the third, so a little wine can boost everything else up

Condimenti – the things added at the end, but also the garnishes and accompaniments – fresh herbs, slices of bread, freshly grated cheese; a dash of vinegar, balsamic or otherwise, or a squeeze of citrus liven things up nicely … also, the things you often add to the bowl and not the pot.

But the lentil soup I made on this first weekend of the New Year, was from somewhere else, but follows the Soups of Italy game plan.

Lentil Soup with Sausage and Tomato

3 Tbl olive oil

1# fresh Italian sausage, either sweet or hot

1 onion

2 carrots

2 celery ribs

2 bay leaves

Salt and pepper

4 garlic cloves

2 Quarts low sodium broth (I used 2 boxes of the chicken broth with wine and herbs. You can also use homemade broth, just add a slug of wine (say 4-8 ounces)

1 28 oz can diced plum tomatoes (or whole, and then break them up)

2 C lentils – pick through them and rinse them

1 Tbl Dijon mustard

½ C chopped fresh parsley (the bunches in the grocery store have been all over the place this winter – I’ve had some bunches that were big enough to be a bride’s bouquet and others closer to boutonnière size – flat or curly, cook’s choice, and save the stems for soup stock)

  1. Heat 1 Tbl of the oil in a large Dutch oven over medium high heat. When it shimmers, add the sausages and cook them until they are brown all over, 7-10 minutes.
  2. Mince the onion; peel and chop the carrots and chop the celery – you can include the leaves.
  3. Remove sausages to a paper towel lined plate to drain.
  4. Add the remaining 2 Tbl of oil to the pot and then the chopped onion, carrot, celery. Add the bay leaves and ½ tsp salt.
  5. Stir frequently, until it is all light golden and fragrant.
  6. Mince the garlic (I confess, I use a press) and add to the pot, stirring for about 30 seconds.
  7. Add the broth (wine if you’re using), the canned tomatoes (squeeze the whole ones through your fingers so they don’t turn into little red rubber balls bobbing along in the soup, and the juice of the tomatoes), and the rinsed lentils to the pot.
  8. Add 1 tsp salt and pepper (this salt is to season the lentils – if you are not using a low sodium broth you can skip this step)
  9. Increase heat and bring to a boil. When boiling, cover and reduce heat for a simmer.
  10. Simmer for 45 minutes or until the lentils are tender.
  11. Meanwhile, cut the sausages into ½ inch thick slices.
  12. When the lentils are tender, remove and discard the bay leaves.
  13. Stir in the Dijon mustard, add the sausage slices and cook until the sausage is heated thoroughly, about 5 minutes.
  14. Add the chopped parsley, adjust seasoning, and serve.

Adapted from Stand-Up Soups, Adam Reid in the Boston Globe Magazine, 2-2-2014, p. 22, which was adapted from New England Soup Factory Cookbook by Marjorie Drucker and Clara Silverstein.

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