Category Archives: Recipe

#GlimpseoftheOrdinary

Team photo: Boston Americans 1901 – proto-Sox

Wednesday, September 6, 2017 8:20 pm

Wednesday is Food Section Day. I pick up both the Boston Globe and the New York Times.

Manage a fairly “on time”  home arrival and even the signs put up by the Gas Company that the places where I usually park will be a Tow Zone  starting tomorrow at 7 AM doesn’t prove to be much of a hindrance – I get a place even closer to my house than usual.

tow_away_no_parking__10374.1426344590.500.659

They’ve closed off three blocks of a five block street. And then there was Harvey in Texas, so did all the Utility trucks go there? They haven’t seemed to have started digging and the pile of pipes is as tall as it’s been…

Not sure what to have for supper. Had a big salad for lunch, so maybe some toast, or there’s more of the bread and cheese not Baked French Toast. (The real problem with eating food that has no name is the effort to have to describe it every time.)

In the Globe (I start with the food sections, headlines can wait – what is this about Red Sox stealing signs???? Applegate? No, Boys of Summer – steal BASES, not signs  …)

There’s a  “Sicilian pasta  with Ricotta” and I remember that I bought some ricotta at the Farmer’s Market – last week, the week before??  Better check the expiration date.

All good – AND there’s the box of tri-colored rigatoni that I got on sale…

Tricolor-RotiniR

Put the water on, salt it like the sea.

Re-read the recipe to make sure there is no hidden ingredient or technique that will trip me up …so far so good.

SICILAN PASTA WITH RICOTTA

16 oz. short pasta shape (cavatappi, radiatore, mezzi rigatoni) I had tricolor penne. Prince. It had been on sale. It was also 12 oz. so I adjusted accordingly.

16 oz. whole milk ricotta – 2 cups. I scooped out half and then half of what was left.

¾ cup pasta water – I used 4 oz.

1 cup freshly grated pecorino Romano for serving

Olive oil, salt and pepper for serving.

 

  1. Bring salt water to a boil. Add pasta, in this case 6 minutes (more or less. I stand over it, spoon in hand, scooping up single pieces, “Are you DONE? Are you Tender? Are you Ready YET??” I look and taste to al dente.
  2. I have a measuring cup that fits under my colander, so when I drain I can have all the pasta water I want. If the water from a can of chick pease is acqua faba, shouldn’t past water be acqua pasta? Or acqua basta, as enough already!
  3. Pour ½ cup of the pasta water back into the pan, toss in the ricotta, and stir it all around. Add the hot penne and stir some more.
  4. Decide it needs more contrast, more bite, more zing than more cheese, so fish out a jar of Kalamata olives – just the thing.
  5. On the plate – a soup plate, because – I put the pasta, top it with some olives and a nice twist of black pepper.

Claudia Catalano Boston Globe Wednesday September 6, 2017, p. G4

I eat at kitchen table.

The downstairs people get a Peapod delivery while I sit down.

peapodstopshop

Leftovers will be for lunch OR a supper frittata later this week.

Time to put on the kettle for a cup of tea. And to read the rest of the papers.

Red Sox…..

RedSoxPrimary_HangingSocks.svg

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#GlimpseoftheOrdinary

Dear Laura Shapiro,

Re: Instagram Your Leftovers

I read your essay in the New York Times , but I don’t have a phone with a camera in it, so please accept this blog post v. an Instagram of my home cooking.

This is not a recipe. Not really. Not in the written down sense, even when I’m done here writing it down.

Last week, I got a bag of too-crusty sourdough rolls at a deep discount from a bakery. I tossed them in the freezer. Saturday, while I was poking through, seeing what I had on hand before planning my midweek trip to the grocery store, Hmmm – I thought – better use those before I forget…..I took the bag out to defrost.

Sunday morning, I actually read the Baked French Toast recipe I was given as a way to use them up. The recipe was from the Pioneer Woman, Ree Drummand.

Although I had the bread, and the eggs on hand (really nice eggs from a friend who raises chickens….Really nice eggs), some other the other ingredients I did NOT have on hand.

One was milk – I’m lactose intolerant, so I don’t keep milk on hand. And then there was the heavy cream…..I keep a little half and half for my coffee….And blueberry season is really over, but pears and apples, with a little prep, could work. That’s when the sugar amounts hit me – ½ cup of sugar, plus ½ cup of brown sugar plus another ½ cup of brown sugar…and then syrup on top?????? That’s a lotta sweet to start the day. Or end it.  And at this point I was planning for something suppery.

I did have some buttermilk on hand (Kate’s – real buttermilk, not cultured)

Kates ButtermilkKates buttermilkk

because I was going to make a Chilaquile Casserole variation from Still Life with Menu (p. 177)

Still life with Menu

with leftover tortillas that I had planned to use in my lunchtime salads until I set one on fire in the toaster oven at work, deciding then never to bring them to work again, at least in living memory of anyone who was there that day. And some shredded taco cheese.

Yes, I had shredded Taco cheese on hand because that’s what they sell at the 7-11 down the street and I wasn’t going to drive over to the grocery just for cheese. No judgement.

So I cubed the bread into bite sized bits, covering the bottom of a non-stick 9×13 pan. I beat my six beautiful and darkly yellowed yolked eggs and added 2 cups of buttermilk, and some salt and pepper. I opened a can of Rotelle tomatoes with mild chiles and added that. Then 1 cup of the shredded taco cheese. Poured it over the bread bits in the pan. Most of the cheese and the diced tomatoes stayed on the top, so I re-arranged them to cover evenly. Put the lid on the pan and popped it into the fridge, went about my day.

At 6 pm I was back, took the pan out of the fridge, preheated the oven to 350° and popped the (plastic) cover off. There are several warnings embossed into the cover reminding you that it is plastic and it should not go into a hot oven. The contents seemed a little dry, so I poured another cup or so of buttermilk on top.

Oven ready, lid off, pan in, timer on for 45 minutes.

Mozart_Kitchen_Timer_WB_1024x1024

This is my timer. Awesomeness.

 

Looking good, smelling like eggs and chiles and tomatoes and a little bit of cheese good, tasting just fine. Something greens, something fruity – supper or lunch for several days/nights.

It took me more time to write this down then to make and eat it.

And thus goes another ordinary day.

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Salad Daze

It’s August.

Too hot even for toast.

Salad.

Easy salad.

Take a bunch of fresh things, of the leafy/ veggie/ fruit sort.

Spinach_leaves

Wash.

Pick. Peel. Seeding optional.

Add a Protein:

  • hard boiled egg
  • cheese
  • bacon
  • sliced meat
  • nuts

Greens – pick, wash, chop or otherwise make small enough to fit on a fork and into your mouth. WHY are so many salads with leaves bigger then the bowl?

Fresh herbs – easy flavor add.

Dress. From a bottle or olive oil and vinegar, salt and pepper . A little mustard makes it nice.

Maybe a carb layer – croutons/a little cold macaronis/leftover rice.

Meal in a bowl.

SdeWarburgSalad

The moshav (agricultural village) of Sde Warburg, Israel, holds the Guinness World Record for the largest lettuce salad, weighing 10,260 kg (11.3 short tons). The event, held on 10 November 2007.

There is a song or two titled Salad Days….

BUT

This is way cool

 

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Possets, Fools & Trifles

OR

How to eat Cream and Sugar before Ice Cream was part of  Summer  – or any other Season

Possets:

Using lemon or lime to curdle cream, which is like custard without the fuss – or egg.

Bon Apetit July 2017  which is “Posset” in the magazine – BUT

“Egg-less custard” on the web site.

They’ve been around since the 16th and 17th century, and are cousins of  syllabubs. Some are made with wine, which make them milkshakes for grown-ups.

posset cup silver

Darling little two handled posset cup. The heading image is a posset cup with a spout.

But here’s the link: http://www.bonappetit.com/recipe/eggless-lime-custards-with-lychees

And some 17th century recipes….

To make a Compound Posset of Sack, Claret, White-Wine, Ale, Beer, or Juyce of Oranges, &c.

Take twenty yolks of eggs with a little cream, strain them, and set them by; then have a clean scowred skillet, and put into it a pottle of good sweet cream, and a good quantity of whole cinamon, set it a boiling on a soft charcoal fire, and stir it continually; the cream having a good taste of the cinamon, put in the strained eggs and cream into your skillet, stir them together, and give them a warm, then have some sack in a deep bason or posset-pot, good store of fine sugar, and some sliced 425 nutmeg; the sack and sugar being warm, take out the cinamon, and pour your eggs and cream very high in to the bason, that it may spatter in it, then strow on loaf sugar.

To make a Posset simple.

Boil your milk in a clean scowred skillet, and when it boils take it off, and warm in the pot, bowl, or bason some sack, claret, beer, ale, or juyce of orange; pour it into the drink, but let not your milk be too hot, for it will make the curd hard, then sugar it.

Otherways.

Beat a good quantity of sorrel, and strain it with any of the foresaid liquors, or simply of it self, then boil some milk in a clean scowred skillet, being boil’d, take it off and let it cool, then put it to your drink, but not too hot, for it will make the curd tuff.

Possets of Herbs otherways.

Take a fair scowred skillet, put in some milk into it, and some rosemary, the rosemary being well boil’d in it, take it out and have some ale or beer in a pot, put to it the milk and sugar, (or none.)

Robert May. The Accomplist Cook. Accomplist Cook

No need for specialty serving ware.

But seriously – if you have an Iced Tea Spoon, why Not a Posset Pot?

As for Fools:

 

 

AN ORANGE FOOL

Take the juice of six Oranges and six Eggs well beaten, a Pint of Cream, a quarter of a Pound of Sugar, a little Cinnamon and Nutmeg; mix all together, and keep stirring over a slow Fire, till it is thick, then put in a little Piece of Butter, and keep stirring till cold, then dish it up.

  • Glasse, Hannah. The Art of Cookery, made Plain and Easy. 1747. Prospect Books ed. 1995, p. 79.

Glasse - First catch

But since

Orange Fool

aired on the Fourth of July, some thought it was…

political, not food at all.

SO this:

There are other fools….

Robert May again:

To make a Norfolk Fool.
Take a quart of good thick sweet cream, and set it a boiling in a clean scoured skillet, with some large mace and whole cinamon; then having boil’d a warm or two take the yolks of five or six eggs dissolved and put to it, being taken from the fire, then take out the cinamon and mace; the cream being pretty thick, slice a fine manchet into thin slices, as much as will cover the bottom of the dish, pour on the cream on them, and more bread, some two or three times till the dish be full, then trim the dish side with fine carved sippets, and stick it with slic’t dates, scrape on sugar, and cast on red and white biskets.

Which leaves

TRIFLES

To make a Trifle.
Take a pinte of thicke Creame, and season it with Suger and Ginger, and
Rosewater, so stirre it as you would then haue it, and make it luke warme in a dish
on a Chafingdishe and coales, and after put it into a siluer peece or a bowle, and so serue it to the boorde.

The_Good_Huswifes_Jewell_Frontispiece_1610(1)

 

Section XII.

To make all manner of Creams, Sack-Possets, Sillabubs, Blamangers, White-Pots, Fools, Wassels, &c.

To make a Triffel.

Take a quart of the best and thickest cream, set it on the fire in a clean skillet, and put to it whole mace, cinamon, and sugar, boil it well in the cream before you put in the sugar; then your cream being well boiled, pour it into a fine silver piece or dish, and take out the spices, let it cool till it be no more than blood-warm, then put in a spoonful of good runnet, and set it well together being cold scrape sugar on it, and trim the dish sides finely.

RobertMayTheAccomplishtCookFrontispiece

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National Corn Fritter Day

Everything has a day…..even

 Corn Fritters

Today!

Corn Fritters

1 can corn 2 teaspoons salt
1 cup flour 1/4 teaspoon paprika
1 teaspoon baking powder 2 eggs

Chop corn, drain, and add dry ingredients mixed and sifted, then add yolks of eggs, beaten until thick, and fold in whites of eggs beaten stiff. Cook in a frying-pan in fresh hot lard. Drain on paper.

Farmer, Fannie Merritt. The Boston Cooking-School Cook Book. Boston: Little, Brown, 1918; Bartleby.com, 2000. www.bartleby.com/87/.

Fannie Farmer 1918 11thed

And Corn Fritters have

aliases.

Why??? Why, are they ashamed of being corn? Or is the fritter part too frivolous? Do they just want to be taken more seriously?  Or is it role-playing, cos-play for fritters??

They are also known as….

Corn Oysters

CORN OYSTERS

        Mix well together one quart grated sweet corn, two tea-cups sweet milk, one tea-cup flour, one tea-spoon butter, two eggs well beaten; season with pepper and salt, and fry in butter like griddlecakes. – Mrs. H. B. S.

-1877. Buckeye Cookery and Practical Housekeeping. p.35.

Buckeye 1877

OysterBed(1)

Eastern Oysters

They do not taste particularly oystery, these fritters of CORN. They taste fried, like the fried part of a fried oyster, but only someone who has never had an oyster, or never been near an oyster or had ever spent any amount of time imagining oysters would be fooled.

And why fool them? Why the charade? Why the name change? Why Mock Oysters?

Crassostrea_gigas_p1040847

Pacific Oyster

Mock Oysters

MOCK OYSTERS OF CORN.

Take a dozen and a half ears of large young corn, and grate all the grains off the cob as fine as possible. Mix with the grated corn three large table-spoonfuls of sifted flour, the yolks of six eggs well beaten. Let all be well incorporated by hard beating.

Have ready in a frying-pan an equal proportion of lard and fresh butter. Hold it over the fire till it is boiling hot, and then put in a portion of the mixture as nearly as possible in shape and size like fried oysters. Fry them brown, and send them to the table hot. They should be near an inch thick.

This is an excellent relish at breakfast, and may be introduced as a side dish at dinner. In taste it has a singular resemblance to fried oysters. The corn must be young.

  • Miss Leslie’s Directions for Cookery. p. 193.

Leslie cookery 1851

They can try hard, but they ain’t no oyster.

And what’s so wrong with being the corn fritter?

Corn fritters are pretty awesome.

Corn

Batter

Butter

Fried

A little salt

All Good.

 

 

 

 

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Slump

Grunt, Buckler, Crisp and Crumble. Add some Cobblers and Pan-dowdies. Betties. We mustn’t leave out the Betties. These are the Goldie-Oldies of the fruit and butter and flour, baked in a dish but not quite a pie, classic New England treats.

These ‘Olde-Thymie’ treats just aren’t as oldie as they like to pass themselves off as. But, since they’re now nearing their centennial….well, I guess they’re old at last!

Welcome to the Colonial Revival! When the New Fashion was to be old-fashioned even though you’re new…..Old Days Old Ways the way they never were…rather like the Bi-Centennial…..we just never stop reinventing the past.

Orchard_House_1941_-_HABS_-_cropped

Orchard House circa 1940.  Home of Louisa  May Alcott in Concord MA – this is where she wrote Little Women. She nicknamed the house “Apple Slump”.

I can’t remember not knowing cobblers, and crisps and crumbles…..and knowing there was some extensional difference between them even if I couldn’t articulate it.But I remember quite clearly when I first heard about  Apple Slump – The summer between third and fourth grade.

The Christmas before Aunt Eileen (Grampy’s only  sister) had given me several brown paper bags FULL of books. She felt it was important to have books on hand, before you thought you could be ready for them, lined up and ready for you when you were ready for them. Chapter books. Book with more words then picture books. And one of them was :

LW

And – I’d seen the movie! Twice!

Little_Women_1933_lobby_card

The Katherine Hepburn one….

and

 

LW1949

the 1949 version with June Allyson

I’ve since seen the 1994 – of course!

Little_women_poster

Hello Winona and Susan Sarandon

Anyhow, I must have looked Louisa May Alcott up in the encyclopedia…that’s a big set of books we used to go to to find stuff out before the internet…..and found out that she called her house Apple Slump.Actually, the house was named Orchard House – Apple Slump was it’s nickname. A house with a pet name!

The first food  Apple Slump reference is in a Salem MA newspaper 2 years before Louisa’s birth

20 November 1830, Salem (MA) Observer, pg. 2, col. 3:
The pumpkin pies and apple slump, bacon and plum-pudding, were smoking on the table, when the old gentleman, gathering round him his smiling guests, said grace in the following manner: “May God bless us, and what is provided for us.”

The Big Apple

Louisa_May_Alcott_headshot

Louisa May Alcott

And LMA left a recipe for Apple Slump –

Slump
Pare, core and slice 6 apples and combine with one c(up). sugar, 1 t(easpoon) cinnamon, and 1/2 c. water in a saucepan. Cover and beat to boiling point. Meanwhile sift together 1 1/2 c. flour, t t/4 t. salt and 1 1/2 t. baking powder and add 1/2 cup milk to make a soft dough. Drop pieces of the dough from a tablespoon onto apple mixture, cover, and cook over low heat for 30 min. Serve with cream.”
John F. Mariani. Encyclopedia of American Food and Drink, (p. 297)

http://www.foodtimeline.org/foodpies.html#slump

 

And then there’s pandowdies….

 

 

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Fourth of July Menu, Early 20th Century

The 45 star flag of 1901.(banner)

WhiteHouseCookBook001

The White House Cook Book was first released in 1894, and was updated regularly.

TO THE

WIVES OF OUR PRESIDENTS,

THOSE NOBLE WOMEN WHO HAVE GRACED THE

WHITE HOUSE

DEAR TO ALL AMERICANS,

THIS VOLUME

IS AFFECTIONATELY DEDICATED

BY THE AUTHOR.

In between the recipes and household hints there are portraits of the first ladies…..all of them up to 1900 in this 1901 edition.

There are also menus for the whole  year, of breakfast, dinner, and supper suggestions for each day of a week for each month of the year, as well as special whole day holiday menus.

New Year’s Day has a menu, as does Washington’s Birthday (which includes Washington Pie for dinner, but also English Pound Cake for supper…)

July begins with a

TR flag 1901

FOURTH OF JULY.

BREAKFAST.

Red Raspberries and Cream

Fried Chicken 86.   Scrambled Tomatoes 196.

Warmed Potatoes 186.     Tennessee Muffins 245.

Toast 268.

Coffee 487.

DINNER.

Clam Soup 46.

Boiled Cod 68., with Lobster Sauce 150.

Roast Lamb 136. With Mint Sauce 152.

New Potatoes Boiled 183.

Green Peas 201.    Spinach with Eggs 202.

Cucumbers Sliced 167

Chicken Patties 85

Naple Biscuits 343.  Vanilla Ice-cream 357.

Chocolate Macaroons 358.   Strawberries.

Coffee 437.

 

SUPPER.

Cold Sliced Lamb 134.

Crab Pie 69. Water-cress Salad 168. Cheese Toast 264.

Graham Bread 234.  Sponge Cake 277.

Blackberries. Tea 439.

 

p. 468 White House CB

I was interested to see Green Peas and New Potatoes for the Fourth, as well as Boiled Cod with Lobster Sauce, even though it’s not quite Poached Salmon and Egg Sauce…..

But wait –

are those

MACAROONS

for dessert at dinner?????

Macaroons again? You spend some time with a recipes, and it turns up EVERYWHERE

Although this time in chocolate….

Chocolate Macaroons

PUT three ounces of plain chocolate in a pan and melt on a slow fire; then work it to a thick paste with one pound of powdered sugar and the whites of three eggs; roll the mixture down to the thickness of about one-quarter of an inch; cut it in small, round pieces with a paste-cutter, either plain or scalloped; butter a pan slightly, and dust it with flour and sugar in equal quantities; place in it the pieces of paste or mixture, and bake in a hot but not too quick oven.

  1. Ziemann, Hugo and Mrs. F. L. Gillette. The White House Cook Book. The Saalfield Publishing Co.: New York-Akron-Chicago. p. 353.

45starflag

Can you name the five states that joined the Union in the 20th century?

Talk amongst yourselves…..

Happy Fourth!

 

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Macaroons and Popcorn

I’m just back from Rochester New York, where ALHFAM was this year.

ALHFAM is Association of Living History Farms and Museums so this was a professional development trip .

There was a whole lot of foods of the past in the program.

macaroons 2017

A Short, Sweet History of Macaroons  presented by Mya Sangster was very sweet indeed.

Mya made samples …A little bag with labeled cookies  so you could eat along with the recipes….

And then another lot up front, all the variations from a single recipe that called for

Almond, walnut, ground nut (peanut) cob nut (hazel or filbert) and coconut

Peanut macaroons are a marvelous and wonderful thing.

Somewhere I have the handout that has the recipes.

May 31st is National Macaroon Day, so I have time to get my act together before the next big celebration.

But I keep finding miscellaneous macaroons in my ordinary reading …like this:

The Sunflower:

I once made macaroons with the ripe blanch’d seeds, but the turpentine did so domineer over all, that it did not answer expectations.”

               Evelyn, John. A Discourse of Sallets. (1699)Prospect Books. 2005. p. 45.

So, Sunflower Macaroons – right out!

and then this:

Popcorn Macaroons

1 cup freshly popped corn

1 cup walnuts or butternuts

3 egg whites

1 cup powdered sugar

Pinch of salt

  1. Heat oven to 350°F. Butter a cooky* sheet.

  2. Chop the popcorn and the nutmeats or put them through the food chopper.

  3. Beat the egg whites stiff and combine with the sugar. Mix with the popcorn and nuts, add salt.

  4. Drop by the spoonful on a buttered cooky sheet.

  5. Bake fifteen minutes in a moderate oven, 350°.

  6. Makes one and half dozen.

 

  • Bowles, Ella Shannon and Dorothy S. Towle. Secrets of New England Cooking. Dover: 2000. First published M. Barrows and Co.: NY. 1947. p. 217.

 

Secrets NE cooking

and then there were other popped corn macaroons.

Popped Corn Macaroons

3/4 cup finely chopped popped corn

3/4 tablespoon melted butter

White 1 egg

5 1/2 tablespoons sugar

1/4 teaspoon salt

1/2 teaspoon vanilla

Blanched and finely chopped almonds

Candied cherries

Process

Add butter to corn; beat white of egg until stiff; add sugar gradually; continue beating. Add to first mixture; add salt and vanilla. Drop from tip of teaspoon on a well buttered baking sheet one and one-half inches apart. With the spoon shape in circles and flatten with a knife, first dipped in cold water. Sprinkle with chopped nut meats and press a shred of candied cherry in top of each macaroon. Bake in a slow oven until daintily browned.

  • The Corn Cook Book. Hiller, Elizabeth O., comp.Chicago, New York [etc.] P.F. Volland company [c1918]

corn cook book vintage

Popcorn macaroons as part of the War effort – the First World War.

Popcorn good. Cookies good. Popcorn cookies….I just have to make enough popcorn to not eat it all before it’s time to make the cookies.

And since it’s hot, it’s only right that there be ice cream to go with the cookies – or is it cookies to go with the ice cream? It seems Mrs. Lincoln (of Boston Cooking School fame) was way ahead of the Ben and Jerry’s curve.

 

 

choc-chip-cookie-dough-detail

Cookie dough great add in – cookies – also great ice cream add in

Macaroon Ice-cream

Dry one dozen stale macaroons, roll or pound them fine and sift through a fine gravy strainer. Add them to ice-cream after either receipt* and flavored with extract of almond or sherry wine. Stir them in when the cream is partly frozen.

               Scald the cream if you wish a firm, solid cream.

               –Mrs. Lincoln. Frozen Dainties.White Mountain Freezer Co., NH. 1889. p. 13. Applewood Books.

  • The two previous receipts are Hollipin Ice-cream and Maraschino Ice-cream, which are both based on the Neapolitan Ice-cream, which has 1 qt. cream, 4 eggs,1 cup sugar and flavoring.

Mrs Lincoln frozen dainties

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New England Style Poutine

I’m talking about chowder fries.

Why have I never heard of these before?

darling-oyster-bar-1_2000x1500

Chowder over French Fries – New England Poutine

Saveur had a story….just last March.

Thick chowder is key – as are hot and crisp Fries. Frozen will not do. This might be my Summer go out for dish.

The spud on spud left my Irish heart happy.

Here’s what may be the first chowder recipe in print.

Boston Evening Post on September 23,1751.

First lay some Onions to keep the Pork from burning
Because in Chouder there can be not turning;
Then lay some Pork in slices very thing,
Thus you in Chouder always must begin.
Next lay some Fish cut crossways very nice
Then season well with Pepper, Salt, and Spice;
Parsley, Sweet-Marjoram, Savory, and Thyme,
Then Biscuit next which must be soak’d some Time.
Thus your Foundation laid, you will be able
To raise a Chouder, high as Tower of Babel;
For by repeating o’er the Same again,
You may make a Chouder for a thousand men.
Last a Bottle of Claret, with Water eno; to smother ’em,
You’ll have a Mess which some call Omnium gather ’em.

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Three Layer Corn Bread

Not so Wicked Wayback….

Talking about 17th century cornbreads, some one recalled a 3 layer cornbread that her mother  used to make….and I recalled this one from Tassajara Bread Book

Tassajara Bread Book

 

  1. Three Layer Corn Bread

Easy, glorious and amazing!

1 cup cornmeal (fresh stone ground from your favorite local mill is best – natch!)

½ c. whole wheat flour

½ cup white flour

¼ cup wheat germ (not in the 1970 version)

2 t. baking powder

1 t salt

2 egg

¼ – ½ honey or molasses

¼ c oil or melted butter

3 cup milk or buttermilk (my fave)

  1. Combine dry ingredients
  2. Combine wet ingredients
  3. Mix together. Mixture will be quite liquidy.
  4. Pour into greased 9×9 pan
  5. Bake at 350° for 50 minutes or until top is springy when gently touched.
  6. As a variation, add a cup of grated cheese – Jack, provolone or parmesan.

Tassajara Bread Book 25th Anniversary Edition (1995)

Tassajara Bread Book (1970) p. 107 (#58)

Oh, the ’70’s…..

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