Category Archives: Pizza

National Cheese Pizza Day

…was September 5th – I can’t believe I missed it!

But wordpress was too busy publishing what I was trying to schedule, so the docket was pretty full that day, anyhow.

 

FNM_100116-Sicilian-Pizza-Cake_s4x3.jpg.rend.sni18col

Sicilian Pizza Cake FoodNetwork Magazine October 2016

A CAKE that looks like a pizza…and pretty convincing, too

Might I make a few changes….

  1. Pizza is a PIE, not a cake

so – change out the cake mix for Pasta Frollo (sweet, short crust)

2.  then – instead of strawberry preserves, why not some sweet tomato jam – here’s a recipe – I’d leave out the hot pepper – or not….

Tomato Jam

The top with Marscapone cheese

marscopone NEC

New England Cheesemaking Supply Company if you want to make your own

and then white chocolate shavings as the grated cheese…

white-chocolate-curls2

FoodNetwork Magazine adds fruit leather pepperoni….but pepperoni has never been my number one pizza, and it IS

National Cheese Pizza Day.

National Pepperoni Pizza Day is February 9th.

 

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Postmortem

patrica cornwell Postmortem

is the name of a book by Patrica Cornwell and there was a copy in the coffee shop last week, so I took it home for a weekend read.

kisskadee interior

The coach is now in another nook, but around that corner is a bookcase for take one or leave one library. And, yes, MOM, I’ve left plenty.Like I’ll leave this little murder mystery. Eventually.

I’ve read it before, but a good mystery can be read more then once. Patrica Cornwell also has Dr. Kay Scarpetta  (the focus character) be a good enough that she is mentioned on the cover of  a cookbook….

Food to Die For

I’ve mentioned this cookbook before – in

Wednesdays Were Chili Nights and

Fresh Garlic Soup

A little quote from Postmortem:

When all else fails, I cook.

Some people go out after a god-awful day and slam a tennis ball around or jog their joints to pieces on a fitness course. I had a friend in Coral Gables who would escape to the beach with her folding chair and burn off her stress with sun and a slightly pornographic romance she wouldn’t have been caught dead reading in her professional world—she was a district court judge. Many of the cops I know wash away their miseries with beer at the FOP lounge.

I’ve never been particularly athletic, and there wasn’t a decent beach within reasonable driving distance. Getting drunk never solved anything. Cooking was an indulgence I didn’t have time for most days, and though Italian cuisine isn’t my only love, it has always been what I do best.

– Cornwell, Patricia. Postmortem. Impress. 1990. p. 128

This is the other reason I keep going back to Kat Scarpetta. I, too, don’t play tennis or swim or get drunk and I don’t have time for cooking – really cooking , not just throwing something together   –  most days. But if I can knead dough or roll out a pastry or chop some onions and add tomatoes……order returns to the world.

Anyhow, Kay goes on to make a pizza with more topping then I would put on a pie, but that’s just me.I’ve got a few mushrooms, and of course, onions and garlic, and there’s a sausage or two lurking in the freezer….I may have to go to the corner store for mozzarella, in which case it will probably be the pre-shredded stuff…..easy-easy

 

Pizza

Dough:
3 1/2 to 3 3/4 cup  bread flour (Of course, I do not make a trip to the store just for this. I’ve used white, wheat and a combination of all three. Bread flour with the higher gluten takes more abuse and makes a very nice crust)
1 packet yeast (I buy in bulk and I have a special yeast measuring spoon, so I have to look up how much that is every-time I write a recipe out. It’s 2 1/4 teaspoons)
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 1/2 cup very warm water
1 tablespoon honey (this actually helps with the browning and moisture content of the finished crust – if you don’t have honey, just leave it out. Sugar will make it a weensy bit sweeter but won’t work like honey.But the little dab of honey is really a secret ingredient and makes this dough different then other doughs)
2 tablespoon olive oil (+ more for the pan)

1) In a medium bowl, combine 3 cups of flour, yeast and salt. Stir in warm water, honey and oil, stirring until mixture begins to leave the sides of the bowl.

2) Turn the dough onto a lightly floured surface and gather into a ball. Knead for about 10 minutes or until it is soft, smooth and elastic, adding enough of the remaining flour to keep the dough from sticking.

3) Place the dough in a large greased bowl and turn to coat. Cover with plastic wrap or a damp kitchen towel  Let the dough rise for 30 to 40 minutes, or until doubled.

5) Punch down dough. On a lightly floured surface knead to release the air bubbles. Cut the dough in half and shape each into a ball. Cover and let rest while preparing your toppings.

Toppings:

3/4 pound whole milk fresh mozzarella or 3 cups pre-shredded (if you’re not gonna get the fresh stuff – which is just about everywhere these days, unlike in 1990…just get the pre-shredded stuff. If you have fresh, cut it up and place on paper towels to drain. If you use your salad spinner as a colander, you can even give it a spin or two to shake off the excess moisture)

Any or all of the following:

2 Tbls olive oil

4 cloves (or more) of garlic, sliced or diced

2 sausages, whichever you like

2 bell peppers, any color or combination of colors, cut into strips

2 slice onions ( I’ve used red, yellow, white, Vidalia – no bad choices here) slice thin (or chopped if you’d prefer)

1 large Portabello mushroom or other ‘shrooms to equal 1 1/2 cups cut up

a little more olive oil

basil, oregano

salt and black pepper

2 cups red gravy

1/2 cup grated (freshly – use the fine side of the grater!) Parmigiano-Reggiano

  1. Is the mozzarella draining? Start draining.
  2.  Put the olive oil in a pan (big enough to hold your topping) Put in the slice sausage, then onion, then peppers, then mushrooms, then garlic…stir it all around. You want to shake all the raw out, and start the carmelization.
  3. Drain on a paper towel
  4. Preheat oven to 450°.
  5. You can make 2 -12 inch pizzas, or one big pan pizza (10 x 15) or make one pizza and freeze the other half of the dough for later.
  6. Oil you pan, roll, stretch or pat your dough into place
  7. spread dough with sauce (1 cup for each 12 inch pizza – adjust accordingly)
  8. Add toppings
  9. Put mozzarella on top and sprinkle lightly with Parmigiano-Reggiano
  10. Bake for 10-14 minutes or until crust is golden and cheese is beginning to brown.
  11. Cut into pieces and mangia tutti!

 

 

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Not a Pizza

I know, you can have an

English Muffin Pizza

Thomas_recipe_PizzaMuffinEM

Thomas’s English Muffins Pizza-ed

But what if you took a tortilla instead of an English Muffin???

tortillas - flour

Flour tortillas

And What IF you happened to have hummus instead of sauce?

hummus container.png

and then you added just a little cheese….and popped it into a hot oven…It WAS a cold night….and when you took it out you folded it in half to eat it…

Besides Supper  – what would you call it?

It’s Pizza-ish, but not pizza.

The best I could come up with is Quesa-rizza – the place in between the quesadilla and the pizza. Or not.The ‘R’ in the middle is a Massachusetts thing.

My son would combine a burrito inside a little pizza and called it a burr-izza.

♦◊♦

And then the 17th century calls….Spring Training  is not just for the Red Sox.

Time to get ready to get back to 1624….

NEHome

and one of my faves slides…

goatmilking

and then there’s the rest of the PowerPoint, but I don’t know how to link. The Pilgrim ate more meals then just “The First Thanksgiving” is the point of the PowerPoint.

 

 

AND…..

Vinca_minor_Nashville

Vinca – also know as creeping myrtle and periwinkle is creeping everywhere. Did I miss the crocuses and snowdrops?

St Patrick

saint patrick

Snakes be gone!

his day is approaching ….all the green around here isn’t just Spring springing.

Time to make the soda bread. Paula Marcoux has a great recipe at this edible South Shore and South Coast link:

One Loaf of Soda Bread – HOLD THE BLARNEY

 

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Piece of Pie

Pizza Pie, that is.

Is there a point where pizza and pie are redundant?

Maybe the point would be at the point of the wedge…..

pizza slice

Piece of pizza – New York style slices

But then there is Pie Pie….

Pumpkin_Pie

Pumpkin Pie

SOOOOOOO,

When you have cooked squash/pumpkin and pizza dough both in your freezer at the same time and it’s also time to think of what’s for supper…….Time for Pumpkin Pizza Pie

Two Great Tastes that Taste Great Together!

 

PUMPKIN PIZZA PIE

2 rounds of pizza dough, rolled out to 10″

1/2  pound cooked squash

1 can Ro-Tell – drain it and drink the juice or save it for soup…

rotel

They were on sale last week – I was thinking of adding them into chili or soup

olive oil

grated  mozzarella or cheddar

grated Romano or Parmesan

  1. Put some oil in a pan. Add the drained Rotel, the squash and a clove or 2 (or 4) of garlic. Any finely diced veg or 2 would do well here now – pepper, onion, celery even a carrot. I had a roasted beet I didn’t think of til it was out of the oven…what a color THAT would have been!

  2. Cook to color, soften. Mash it down,nothing too big, too hard, too lumpy.

  3. Let the mixture cool a bit.

  4. Turn up the oven to 450-500°. Let it be hot.

  5. If you have a lump of cheese, shred it now. Shredded cheese was also on sale, and a name brand, not the store brand stuff. I bought it in spite of the chatter lately about wood pulp et al.in assorted cheese product. This one had potato starch, visible, all over the place potato starch, and plenty of it.  Next time I shred my own.  

  6. Sprinkle some grated Romano or Parmesan in a little circle in the middle. This is a trick I learned from Ian C. at a wood-fired oven workshop years ago.  It makes your first bite extra savory.This doesn’t work on pizzas that aren’t circles to be cut in wedges, although a little extra flavorful cheese underneath almost always works.  

  7. Divide the vegetable sauce between the 2 pizzas and spread across the dough.

  8. Sprinkle any fresh seasoning herbs may want now : fresh basil or fresh thyme. Sage, in very small amounts works with the squash. I had some fresh rosemary, and it only took a couple of pinches, minced fine.

  9. Top  with the shredded cheese. The cheese should not out weigh the rest of the topping….

  10. Put in a hot oven for 10 minutes and then check. It should be golden brown on top and bottom. If not, put it back in for a couple of more minutes – your oven will not be the same as mine! My oven took about 6 minutes more. If I wanted well-done pizza (don’t laugh, I know people who like things COOKED) keep  in in even a few minutes more. Don’t keep it in so long the Fire Department comes over to see what’s in the oven.

  11. Take out of the oven, cool for a minute or two (It helps the cheese set and keeps you from burning yourself). Cut in slices and serve. I froze my leftovers for another day (which was more then one other day, the last one of which was today).

  12. Glorious colors, tomato and pumpkin, two New World vine fruits together!

 

 

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Filed under Eating, Italian, Pantry, Pizza, Recipe, squash

Beer Pizza, Honey

 

More hunny, Rabbit?

More hunny, Rabbit?

Another beer pizza, one that also has honey it. I’ve only recently started putting sugar 0r in this case, honey, in my pizza doughs. Not enough to alter the flavor so much, but to encourage better browning, which also makes it a little crisper.

Beer Pizza Dough with Honey

1 (¼-oz.) package active dry yeast
¾ cup warm beer with 1/4 cup water (the liquid should equal a cup – depending on your beer it could be 1/2 and 1/2 or even all beer)

1 tsp. honey

2 tbsp. extra-virgin olive oil plus more for the bowl

1 tsp.  salt

3 cups bread flour, plus more as needed

12 minutes at 500

  1. Mix the yeast with the beer in a small bowl. Let get all good and frothy – 5-15 minutes.
  2. Add the honey, the olive oil and the salt.
  3. Put the flour in a large bowl. Add the liquid mixture. Mix it all together until it’s dough.
  4. Turn onto a floured surface and knead until it’s tight and as as smooth as a baby’s bottom.
  5. Wash out and oil the bowl, put the dough back in and turn so all sides are slick and less likely to get crusty (crusty – good in pizza, bad in dough).
  6. Let rise 1-2 hours  OR
  7. Put in the fridge overnight and up to 2 days. Bring to room temp (1 -2 hours depending on your room) before continuing. Whatever works for your schedule.
  8. Preheat the oven to 500° F.
  9. Divide the dough into 4 parts for 4 12″ pizzas ( or more or fewer, depending on your final product. I’ve been making fewer, smaller pizzas and keeping the ‘leftover’ dough in the freezer for the next pizza meal.)
  10. Roll the dough or stretch or pat it – you should be developing a technique all your own by now….
  11. Top and bake Here’s the link to the Six Onion Pizza from Saveur that the dough came from.

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Filed under Influencers, Pizza, Recipe

Beer Pizza Pronto

Pizza and Beer are a pretty good combination.

Grolsch Beer  - Dutch beer from a brewery founded in 1615 - a little history in a little bottle

Grolsch Beer – Dutch beer from a brewery founded in 1615 – a little bottle of history.

Pizza without sauce...sometimes known as white pizza or pizza bianca

Pizza without sauce…sometimes known as white pizza or pizza bianc0

So beer IN the pizza….pure genius!

This is a dough that can be made in a hurry, mostly with pantry/fridge ingredients, so also easy to do on the spur of the moment.

BEER PIZZA PRONTO

3 cups AP flour, plus more for the board
1 tablespoon baking powder
½ teaspoon salt
1 12 oz beer, bottle or can, light or dark, whatever your purse and palate allow in the house
Olive oil
3 cups grated mozzarella cheese (not the fresh; the supermarket kind. Even the pre-grated packaged stuff would work here; depending on your topping, the pre-grated ‘cheddar’ stuff could also be good – let your taste buds decide)
Assorted toppings – you know what you like – or what you have…
1. Pre heat oven to 450°
2. Lightly grease 2 baking sheets with olive oil; put aside.
3. Spread flour on your work surface – give yourself enough swing room if you’re using a rolling pin.
4. Open the beer (If it’s been a rough day, open 2 – one for the pizza and one for the cook. Put the Cook beer out of swing range of the pizza dough prep – if you spill it, angels will weep. They just don’t like messy kitchens)
5. In a large bowl, combine flour, salt, baking powder. I use a whisk.
6. Pour in the beer, mix well. This will form a sticky lump.
7. Dump it out on the floured work surface. Roll it in the flour until it’s not so sticky and knead it a time or two to form a ball. A Bench knife is your friend. Divide to make 2 balls.
8. Place one ball on each greased baking sheet and pat, pull and otherwise coax with your impeccably clean hands the dough into a 11-12” circle (oil your hands if the dough gets sticky ) OR
9. Roll each ball to an 11-12” circle and place on the greased baking sheet.
10. Sprinkle 1 ½ cups of the grated cheese on top of each, and top with topping – remember, this is quick and easy, so don’t over load. Make a salad or an antipasto to serve WITH the pizza with all the cool stuff you’ve found kicking around your fridge and pantry instead of piling it all on this pizza. This is a quick dough, not a sturdy one. Cheese, one topping. IF you need some tomato sauce, very little, merest, tiniest  smidge – or use the sauce to dip……you are eating outside the box, after all!
11. Bake 12-15 minutes until golden brown top and bottom.

Adapted from Jeanne Lemlin. Simple Vegetarian Pleasures. Quill. 1998. p. 137.

Simple Veg Pleasures

Jeanne Lemlin

Jeanne Lemlin

 

 

 

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Pizza measures up

I decide a few weeks ago to write more on pizza, because there’s more then one good pizza, and pizza just needs more attention.  Because it’s so common and easy to come by, I think that pizza gets overlooked.

Unless it’s being made far too much of by certain foodie sorts, who want it to ‘authentic in every detail.’ Usually meaning tricky, difficult, expensive, exclusive. All the things that pizza is not.

Plymouth has several places that offer really good – and really varied pizzas. There is Italian pizza and southern Italian pizza  and  Greek pizza and even Brazilian pizza as well as not one, but 2, chain  pizza places all in the general downtown area.

And there’s still more pizza to make at home.

Last week the New York Times jumped my pizza story by 2 days because the food pages come out on Wednesdays, with Sam Sifton’s  story “A Little Homework” which is about – you guessed it – making pizza at home.

Here’s the link: A Little pizza Homework   on the website they added pizza to the article title.The video about making the dough is very good. Notice that Falco uses only his hands to mix the flour and water to make up the dough – no spoons to wash up!

Sifton’s right – making pizza dough is easy peasy. And it can keep in the fridge for days, so you can find the time. It’s the special flour that I have a problem with. If you don’t have any 00 Italian flour on hand – make the dough anyhow. If you’re hot to try it, you can order it on line. King Arthur Flour has an Italian Pizza blend that’s like 00 flour, if Italian Pizza blend flour isn’t on your grocery store shelves.kaf Italina flourThere’s another video on pizza at How2heroes which calls for bread flour instead of 00…

What I like about all this is that the sauce is simplicity itself – canned tomatoes, olive oil and a little salt, blenderized.

waring blender

Time to pull out the blender…sometimes I just use crushed tomatoes on pizza.

The other thing I like is that he weighs out the ingredients, which with flour ESPECIALLY makes a world of difference, although with this small amount and for this particular items, eyeballing it will work. But if you don’t have a kitchen scale…here’s the one I’m lusting after now, and if I remember – someday will be the replacement for the perfectly fine but takes up too much room scale that I have now.

foldingscale

The Tri fold Folding Scale

Another version - the scale folds up

Another version – the scale folds up

 

This is the scale I have now - it has plenty of measuring left in it

This is the scale I have now – it has plenty of measuring left in it

The other, other thing I like in the paper was a sidebar on what to drink with pizza. The answer is – Drumroll, please –

Just about everything!

To quote Eric Asimov:

One thing never worth fretting about is what to drink with pizza. What could be bad? Nothing. (Please pause and reflect here. Talk among yourselves) The Italians seem to prefer beer or cola (Note: in my family, orange soda) I think anything with bubbles is delicious. Dry Lambrusco is great. So is Champagne, believe it or not, especially with the Green and White Pies. …..and there are more and more recommendations and the last line is 

What to drink with pizza? Whatever you like.

 

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Homemade Pizza

In order to create order, there was a time when different days of the week had a different food…like Chili Wednesdays or Meatless Mondays, there were also Pizza Fridays.

Pizza also was a food I associated with being easy to make (and fun) because when we went to my Aunt’s there was almost always pizza, in a big baking sheet, on standby, should somehow we prove too famished to be able to wait for the incredible and enormous meal that was waiting for us. It was, after all, as much as an hour from our house to hers.

If you don’t happen to have dough on hand, pizza could take a while to have ready. Yeast takes a certain amount of time to grow and prosper; if you make it a head and freeze it, a frozen lump of dough needs to thaw before you can make a pizza from it, and if you forget to take it out of the freezer in the morning before you go to work, all you’ve got is a frozen lump of dough and not an actual pizza. And a hungry boy.

Don’t ask me how I know this.

Nika Hazelton to the rescue. I started reading Italian cookbooks in the ’70’s so I could learn to spell the names of the foods that I had been eating all my life.

I discovered that Italy had many of dialects, not just of accents, but also words and foods. Nika was one of the first authors I found. She also wrote VOLUMES. This will not be the last visit to Nika.

Nika Hazelton

Nika Hazelton

BAKING POWDER PIZZA
(Pizza Fatto in Casa)

Dough:
1 cup flour
½ teaspoon salt
1 Tablespoon baking powder
3 Tablespoons olive oil
1/3 cup water
Olive oil
Toppings of your choice – you know what you want – don’t nibble it all before you make up the dough.
1. Preheat the oven at 450°.
2. Whisk or sift the flour, salt and baking powder together.
3. Combine the 3 tablespoons olive oil with the water and stir into the dry mixture until well mixed – this should take about a minute.
4. Turn out on a lightly floured surface and knead for another minute, until it is a ball.
5. Place the ball of dough in the middle of a greased baking sheet (or use a silpat) Pat the dough flat into a circle, starting in the center and working out. It should end up between about 1/8 inch thick in the middle and closer to ½ inch at the outer edges.
6. If the dough tears, just push more dough over it to close them up.
7. Brush olive oil at the edges of the circle.
8. Top with toppings
9. Put in the HOT oven for 10 – 15 minutes until the dough is browned and the toppings are melted and bubbly.
Makes 1 11-inch pizza.
Adapted from Nika Hazelton. The Regional Italian Kitchen. M. Evans and Company, Inc. New York: 1978. p. 162.

Regional Italian Kitchen

Regional Italian Kitchen

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Margherita and Pizza

The reign of Umberto I and Margherita of the Kingdom of Italy  began on this day 136 years ago, the 9 January in  1878. They ruled until 29 July 1900. Margherita Maria Teresa Giovanna of Savoy (etc, etc) dies on the 4th of January in 1926.

Queen Margherita

Queen Margherita

Considering the politics she was born into, and married into and the time and place of history that she was a part of, how is it that  because of pizza that she is most often remembered today?

Pizza al taglio - pizza WITH CORNERS in Rome

Pizza al taglio – pizza WITH CORNERS in Rome

A Philosophy of Pizza Napoletanismo is a  Great Pizza History website 

Flag of Italy - so have a pizza with red, white and green in honor of Queen Margherita

Flag of Italy – so have a pizza with red, white and green in honor of Queen Margherita

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Pizza on a Roll

not exactly – WAY too many carbs…but since the pizza topic is far from exhausted, another pizza from my past.

But first – when is a pizza not a pizza? What is the essential pizzaness of the pizza?

What about this pizza from Papa Gino’s menu :

  • Buffalo Chicken Mac & Cheese Buffalo Chicken Mac & Cheese Spicy buffalo chicken and macaroni in a creamy cheese sauce with a blend of American, asiago, and sharp cheddar cheese, topped with crispy breadcrumbs.

Is the combination of buffalo chicken AND mac AND cheese take it beyond pizza, or is it defined by the crust and the pan? I just heard about this for the very first time this month, and I just don’t know.

What about this pizza from Brazil ? :

Chocolate Pizza from Brazil

Chocolate Pizza from Brazil

Continue pondering…….

There is another reason I connect pizza and Christmas. According to Wikipedia (I know, keep reading):

The term ‘pizza’ first appeared “in a Latin text from the southern Italian town of Gaeta in 997 AD, which claims that a tenant of certain property is to give the bishop of Gaeta ‘duodecim pizze’ [‘twelve pizzas’] every Christmas Day, and another twelve every Easter Sunday”

(Salvatore Riciniello (1987) Codice Diplomatico Gaetano, Vol. I, La Poligrafica)

And where was my mother born? Gaeta.

I should definitely revive the 12  pizza thing. Next year. Someone remind me. BTW, there are both Pizza and History of Pizza entries in Wiki and they should probably spend a little more time together.

A little more general history , on pizza and Pizza Margharita, the pizza that carries the colors of the Italian flag in the red tomato, the white mozzarella and the green basil. On second thought, since this leads right into the story of the pizza napoletana, the European Union and legislation (Hooper, John (9 December 2009). “Pizza napoletana awarded special status by EU”. The Guardian. Retrieved 9 December 2009.) this is proabably a story for another day.

Pizza Margherita

Pizza Margherita

So if the Pasta di Pizza (that would be the dough that makes the crust) has no yeast in it, but is leavened with baking powder, is it still a pizza? asks the girl who has made (and eaten) English muffin pizza, toaster pizza, pizza roll-ups (at least I think that’s what they were called – or were they pizza bites?) Here they are…..

Cresent rollup - 1982 Pillsbury Bake Off winner

Crescent Pizza  roll-ups – 1982 Pillsbury Bake Off winner!

So here’s a recipe for Quick Pizza – and it is made in a jiffy, with ingredients that I generally had on hand.

Quick pizza

2 C flour + ½ cup ww (although I generally use half and half flour)

1 ½ teaspoons Baking Power – not be confused with baking soda, which is for Irish bread and not Italian Pizza

½ teaspoon salt

4 TBL butter

1 cup milk

toppings

  1. Heat the oven to 450. Prepare 2 cookie sheets – parchment paper, silpat or well greased.
  2. Mix the flours together with the baking powder and the salt.
  3. Cut in (or rub in – it’s rather like biscuit here) the butter.
  4. Add the milk and form into a dough ball.
  5. Cut the dough into 4 equal parts and shape into 8″ rounds (or other shapes to fit your  sheets or your plates or your moods)
  6. Put on your toppings.
  7. Bake for 12-15 minutes or until golden on the bottom and melty to brown on top.

from Jeanne Lemlin. Main Course Vegetation Pleasure . HarperPerennial. 1995 (June 1995). P. 134. She also wrote  Quick Vegetarian Pleasures and Simple Vegetarian Pleasures.

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Filed under Christmas, Pizza, Recipe