Category Archives: Pantry

Grapenuts Pudding

 

While brewing a little beer at work recently…..

All in the name of research and history….

We had some malted barley and malted wheat brewing and we all noticed how much it smelled like Grape-Nuts.

The healthy, crunchy, good for you cereal.

grapenuts current

And I started to think, ponder, dwell, fantasize, dream  about

GRAPENUTS PUDDING

Not the Puff Pudding, just plain old Grape-nuts custard……

But first to find the Grape-nuts….

Kathy went to the store first and found Grape-nuts Flakes….do they even make grape-nuts any more?????

Another store, with some poking and searching  – Grape-nuts! And a store brand that had much more sugar and salt…..

So the Grape-nuts come home, but the pudding recipe is no longer on the box.

The internet offered several solutions:

grapenut pudding rx

The thin layer of grape-nuts at the bottom is not the layer I’m looking for….keep looking

grape-nut-pudding-Parade mag

This is from Parade Magazine – thicker layer at the bottom, and thinner, crispier layer at top. I hope.

  • INGREDIENTS:

  • 6 large eggs

  • ¾ cup sugar

  • 1 tsp freshly grated nutmeg

  • ½ tsp cinnamon

  • 1 tsp vanilla

  • 4 cups whole milk

  • Grape-Nuts cereal

  • whipped cream

 

  1. Butter a 2-quart baking dish and preheat oven to 400°F.
  2. Whisk eggs, sugar, nutmeg, cinnamon, and vanilla in a large bowl. Whisk in milk.
  3. Pour a thin layer of Grape-Nuts cereal into baking dish, barely covering bottom of dish. Pour in milk mixture.
  4. Bake 30 to 40 minutes, until mostly set but jiggly in center. Serve with whipped cream.

By Sarah DiGregorio  May 10, 2014

https://communitytable.parade.com/288844/sarahdigregorio/grape-nuts-pudding/

 

Still not the thick layer at the bottom I remember, the layer of soggy grape-nuts….

Savour has a version that promises the bottom layer….

December 19, 2007 Saveur

serves 6-8

Ingredients

1 cup Grape-Nuts cereal

1 qt. milk

4 eggs

12 cup sugar

1 tbsp. vanilla extract

14 tsp. fine salt

Grated nutmeg

Instructions

Heat oven to 350°. Grease a 2-quart glass loaf pan with 1 tsp. butter; set aside. Put cereal into a bowl; set aside.

Bring milk just to a boil over medium heat; pour over cereal and set aside to let soak for 5 minutes.

Beat together eggs, sugar, vanilla, and salt in a large bowl. Slowly pour egg mixture into milk mixture while whisking constantly. Transfer to reserved pan; set in a deep roasting pan. Pour enough hot water into roasting pan that it reaches halfway up pudding pan. Bake until just set, about 1 14 hours. Let cool; sprinkle with grated nutmeg.

http://www.saveur.com/article/Recipes/Grape-Nuts-Pudding

 

But now that Spring has finally come, and the weather is in the 70’s, the last thing I want to do is turn on the oven and fuss with a  water bath  – even calling it bain marie doesn’t make it more attractive.

Pea shoots, micro-green salads, pasta with seasonal pestos, eggs with greeny things….It’s still April; there’ll be a day for custard before May.

 

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Filed under New England, Pantry, Recipe, The 1960"s, Wicked Wayback

Boston Brown Bread – Slow and Easy

What’s so Boston about it? Probably the molasses…No one says….

Recipes for steam brown bread go back to the 1830’s…..and they mention lots of different containers. I think there’s a  timeline….

Pudding basins :

pudding basin

Pudding basins look like bowls and sometimes are – but that lip is to tie a top down so you could steam

Pudding molds:

steamed pudding mold

This is a steamed pudding mold – pour the batter in, snap on the lid and put it in boiling water

Baking powder tins

Clabber_Girl

Baking powder tins seem to be the first substitute from pudding molds

Coffee cans

coffee-cans

They need to be METAL coffee cans and not the plastic ones.

Then there was a more recent suggestion to save  cans that had safe seams….but I don’t buy that much food in cans, so I was perfectly contented to buy Boston Brown Bread in cans.

bbrown bread

But then I saw a recipe for

MASON JARS BROWN BREAD MADE IN THE SLOW COOKER

GENIUS

The recipe is pretty much the same though the decades…

Good Housekeeping cb

Good Housekeeping (1960’s)

beard on bread

Beard On Bread (1970’s)

KAF 200th anniversary

And King Arthur Flour (1990’s)

and the KAF website – all the same ingredients, different containers and method of cooking

BOSTON BROWN BREAD

SLOW AND EASY

1 cup cornmeal

1 cup rye flour

1 cup wheat flour

1 tsp baking soda

2 cups buttermilk

¾ cup dark, unsulphured molasses

(up to 1 cup of raisins is optional. I usually opt in)

 

  1. Mix the flours with the baking soda. Put aside.
  2. Mix the buttermilk and molasses. Add the wets to the drys.
  3. Grease 4  1 pint WIDE MOUTHED mason jars. (see the illustrations below)
  4. Grease the lids, too.
  5. Divide the batter between the four jars – I used a canning funnel.
  6. Wide them off.
  7. Put the greased lids on.
  8. Put the jars in a slow cooker. Fill the cooker halfway up the sides f the jar.
  9. Put on the lid and turn up the heat.
  10. Cook on high 2-3 hours until a toothpick comes out clean.
  11. Us potholders (mine are silicon) and take the jars out of the water.
  12. When they’re cool enough, shake the bread out of the jars and cool on a rack.
  13. Slice and serve. Eat with butter or cream cheese.
  14. Wrap in aluminum foil and store in the fridge. It’s usually magically gone so very soon…..

 

BLUE_WM_PINT_JAR_1

This is the wide-mouth jar. Notice the straight side up to the opening. If you steam bread in here, the bread will come out when it’s done. This is an important detail. Should you use the wrong jar, serve it with a spoon……..like you meant to do it the whole time.

ball-blue-heritage-regular-mouth-pint-16oz-mason-jar

This is the regular jar – notice that while you could fish a pickle out, a bread would have a hard time slipping out. Hence the serve with a spoon option…..

canning funnel

I love my canning funnel. I use it all the time, wets and drys. Sometimes I can, too.

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Filed under Bread, New England, Pantry

Oatober

Make that #Oatober….someone at Quaker Oats is pretty genius.

Could it be this guy??

quaker-1877

This is the first Quaker for Oats – trademarked in 1877. They’ve been working the genius marketing for a while.

And in 1891, Quaker put the first recipe on the back of the box – for Oatmeal Bread…A few years later Fannie Farmer had a Quaker Oats Bread in the Boston Cooking School Cookbook. Coincidence? I think not!

QUAKER OATS BREAD (1896)

Ingredients
2 cups boiling water.
1/2 cup molasses.
1/2 tablespoon salt.
1/2 yeast cake dissolved in
1/2 cup lukewarm water.
1 cup Quaker Rolled Oats.
4 3/4 cups flour.

Directions
Add boiling water to oats and let stand one hour; add molasses, salt, dissolved yeast cake, and flour; let rise, beat thoroughly, turn into buttered bread pans, let rise again, and bake.

By using one-half cup less flour, the dough is better suited for biscuits, but, being soft, is difficult to handle.

To make shaping of biscuits easy, take up mixture by spoonfuls, drop into plate of flour, and have palms of hands well covered with flour before attempting to shape.

The Boston Cooking School Cookbook
By Fannie Merritt Farmer (1896)pp.59-60.

This makes a pretty dense loaf…and pretty is the wrong word, too. But it makes great toast. Maryetta’s Oatmeal Bread is a lighter brighter oatmeal bread option.

My other oat adventure today was thanks to Martha Stewart.

martha_stewart_2011_shankbone

Martha Stewart, probably kicking herself for not coming up with Oatober.

In the September issue of Martha Stewart Living she had a tip and recipe for quick cooking steel cut oats.

mslsept2016

I eat oatmeal for breakfast pretty much every morning and have for years. I believe that oats truly brought my cholesterol levels down, down and fast, and frankly eating breakfast is pretty easy, pretty inexpensive and has far fewer side effects then most of those little pills…. not to mention more pleasant and easier to remember in the fog of morning. Oats are the base, the only choices I have to make are what to put in them. That choice I usually make at the market, and do the same breakie all week. Ah, blueberries and cinnamon! Oh, Parmesan and pepper!  Dropt egg and rooster sauce; cranberries and honey….The Gracious Pantry has some pretty inspired oatmeal toppings. Back to oats –

Steel cut out are nubbly and more textured then rolled outs.

rolled_oats

Extreme closeup of rolled oats – the roller goes over them and they get very very thin

 

bowl_of_dry_steel-cut_oats_with_full_spoon

Steel cut oats – are chopped – chunky – chewy

Steel cut oats take longer to cook and are not zippy quick or mindless in the morning. I do not want to spend my dawn’s early light time at the stove stirring porridge.There’s always a slow cooker option, but then I’d be making lots, and have to repack to re-heat…not easier.

BUT

soak them the night before, and then 5-10 minutes in the pan – easy peasy! I made enough for one – so 1/4 cup of steel cut oats, 1 cup water and a pinch of salt in my littlest sauce pan and pop the lid on. It sat on the stove overnight, so was there to greet me when I put the coffee on, and after the first cup I remembered why it was there….

lecreuset-pot

This look very much like my little yellow pot, which pretty much lives on top of my stove.It’s that kind of workhorse.

After the second cup, awake and ready to rejoin the world, I brought the oats and water and the pinch of salt to a boil. I then lowered the heat to a fairly active simmer and stirred it from time to time until the water was gone and it was just oaty goodness and no longer liquid. A tooth test – firm, some give, but not hard, not little pebbles. Done. Under 10 minutes, maybe 7 or 8.

Rolled oats take 5 minutes at 50% power in the microwave. The new directions on the box say 3 minutes at 100%, but this just make them pasty. Take the 2 extra minutes!

Martha eats her oatmeal with golden raisins and currants and a slash of low fat milk. Sweet and milky are not my cup of tea. I had some butter and a little cheddar cheese.

There is a really great oatmeal muffin recipe lurking in one of my cookbooks…apples or was it apple sauce? Fortunately, I have all of Oatober ahead of me to find it.

bowl_of_oatmeal_cover_art

My Bowl of Oatmeal was not a movie…and I not on speaking terms with my breakie.

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Filed under Autumn, Breakfast/Brunch, Pantry, Recipe

National Apple Pie Day

was May 13th.

How did I miss this????

Who makes apple pie in MAY??????

There’s rhubarb and blueberries and strawberries…..but apples…

Not still and not yet.

Now, if were

National Mock Apple Pie Day

I could get behind that. A little pastry practice for all the lovely real fruits that are just ahead.

ritz cracker

Ritz Cracker did not invent the mock apple pie….but it certainly popularized it.

When there are no apples people still wanted apple pie. Dried apples were the thing that used to extend the season. After the fresh apples, the dried apple. After the dried apple, the crackers….and then Spring and Summer fruits until the new apples.

Here’s an earlier then Ritz version:

applepiepart1applepie part2

A CALIFORNIA PIONEER APPLEPIE-1852
Mrs. B. C. Whiting.

Break four soda crackers into an earthen bowl. Pour
over them a pint of cold water, made very tart with citric
acid. When soft, but not mashed, removed the soda crackers
to your pie plate, with the under crust already on; then sift
over two tablespoons of light brown sugar, and a little all-

spice and cinnamon to flavor. (The brown sugar and spice
give the requisite color), after which put on a prettily per-
forated top crust, and bake in a very quick oven a few
moments.
The deception was most complete and readily accepted.
Apples at this early date were a dollar a pound, and we
young people all craved a piece of mother’s applepie to
appease our homesick feelings.

applepiesource

Los Angeles, C. Simpson Methodist Episcopal Church (Ladies Social Circle).1894.How We Cook in Los Angeles. A practical cook-book containing six hundred or more recipes….including a French, German and Spanish department with menus, suggestions for artistic table decorations, and souvenirs.pp.240-1.

 

 

Here’s what used to be on the back of the Ritz box:

mockapplepieritz

I have made this pie. More than once. The first time I made it, there was a certain amount of disbelief. So, I made it a second time (in the same 24 hours) –  with witnesses.

Which also happened the second time I made it…..and I have made it since then, too. Because sometimes crackers are better then apples.

.It’s still a little hard to believe how much like apple pie it tastes. And looks. And smells.

Is it the cinnamon?

Or is it just how bland so many of our apples have gotten that they taste like crackers?

Part of the ruse is science.

pie-science2

Newsweek has an article on the appleless apple pie.

Part is that your eyes and nose believe, and then convince your brain.

mock_apple_pie_Savour2008

from Saveour, Feb 2008

And it’s really, really good – if  ironic  – with cheddar cheese

apple pie w cheddar

This is pretty orange cheddar….but for cheese and cracker pie …

Just like Real Apple Pie.

 

 

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Filed under Eating, Pantry, Perception ways, Pie, Spring, The 1980's

Piece of Pie

Pizza Pie, that is.

Is there a point where pizza and pie are redundant?

Maybe the point would be at the point of the wedge…..

pizza slice

Piece of pizza – New York style slices

But then there is Pie Pie….

Pumpkin_Pie

Pumpkin Pie

SOOOOOOO,

When you have cooked squash/pumpkin and pizza dough both in your freezer at the same time and it’s also time to think of what’s for supper…….Time for Pumpkin Pizza Pie

Two Great Tastes that Taste Great Together!

 

PUMPKIN PIZZA PIE

2 rounds of pizza dough, rolled out to 10″

1/2  pound cooked squash

1 can Ro-Tell – drain it and drink the juice or save it for soup…

rotel

They were on sale last week – I was thinking of adding them into chili or soup

olive oil

grated  mozzarella or cheddar

grated Romano or Parmesan

  1. Put some oil in a pan. Add the drained Rotel, the squash and a clove or 2 (or 4) of garlic. Any finely diced veg or 2 would do well here now – pepper, onion, celery even a carrot. I had a roasted beet I didn’t think of til it was out of the oven…what a color THAT would have been!

  2. Cook to color, soften. Mash it down,nothing too big, too hard, too lumpy.

  3. Let the mixture cool a bit.

  4. Turn up the oven to 450-500°. Let it be hot.

  5. If you have a lump of cheese, shred it now. Shredded cheese was also on sale, and a name brand, not the store brand stuff. I bought it in spite of the chatter lately about wood pulp et al.in assorted cheese product. This one had potato starch, visible, all over the place potato starch, and plenty of it.  Next time I shred my own.  

  6. Sprinkle some grated Romano or Parmesan in a little circle in the middle. This is a trick I learned from Ian C. at a wood-fired oven workshop years ago.  It makes your first bite extra savory.This doesn’t work on pizzas that aren’t circles to be cut in wedges, although a little extra flavorful cheese underneath almost always works.  

  7. Divide the vegetable sauce between the 2 pizzas and spread across the dough.

  8. Sprinkle any fresh seasoning herbs may want now : fresh basil or fresh thyme. Sage, in very small amounts works with the squash. I had some fresh rosemary, and it only took a couple of pinches, minced fine.

  9. Top  with the shredded cheese. The cheese should not out weigh the rest of the topping….

  10. Put in a hot oven for 10 minutes and then check. It should be golden brown on top and bottom. If not, put it back in for a couple of more minutes – your oven will not be the same as mine! My oven took about 6 minutes more. If I wanted well-done pizza (don’t laugh, I know people who like things COOKED) keep  in in even a few minutes more. Don’t keep it in so long the Fire Department comes over to see what’s in the oven.

  11. Take out of the oven, cool for a minute or two (It helps the cheese set and keeps you from burning yourself). Cut in slices and serve. I froze my leftovers for another day (which was more then one other day, the last one of which was today).

  12. Glorious colors, tomato and pumpkin, two New World vine fruits together!

 

 

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Filed under Eating, Italian, Pantry, Pizza, Recipe, squash

Darling Clementine

and other sunshine substitutes to warm up the winter…

I haven’t found that many Darling Clementines this winter…until this week!

clementines

The grocers shelves have been full of Halo Mandarins ( a New York Times story on Mandarin growing in California)

and of course, grapefruit

Grapefruit-Whole-&-Split

 

and mangoes – Van Gogh mangoes, no less

van Gogh mango

Van Gogh painted lots of fruit and veg, but no mangoes…although in the Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam there is a painting by Paul Gauguin of Mango Trees

Mango trees Gaugin VanGogh musuem

 

I bought some beets last week…..

Beets-Bundle.jpg

I once had a bunch of beets on the checkout counter. The cashier held them up and asked,”Bunch of radishes?” I shook my head, and he asked,”But they are a BUNCH???” Evidently ‘bunch’ is a category he could look things up by….we finally got to BEET.

With the bunch of beets you get the bonus greens, good by themselves, good for soup. I roasted the beets for salad, and ate them peeled, diced  with some blue cheese dressing. I was going to mix them with orange, but I just kept eating them (beet and orange) separately.

Lemons were in the markdown bin….

lemons

I’ll juice them and put the juice in an ice cube tray in the freezer. When frozen, I’ll pop them into a baggie (I get the freezer bags because they have a place to write what’s inside) and be able to have a little juice whenever…..

ice cube trays

I love the new ice cube trays! I don’t often use ice cubes, but I like to freeze bits of things to use them later.

I’ve had plenty of roasted pumpkin to keep me warm….I used some to make a pasta sauce. Or I could have used dome to top a pizza…..

roasted squash

.

I had some red and yellow peppers, and inspired by a recent New York Times story,as well as any excuse to use the oven because it’s SOOOOO cold outside,  I made a red and yellow pepper pizza…EXCEPT (you knew that this part was coming…..)

I didn’t have the sausage or the mozzarella cheese…..actually, I HAD the sausage, it was just in the freezer and a little hard to use at the time, so I left it out. Then I realized that I had no mozzarella or ricotta or cheddar… heavy dairy products were put on the shopping list, and I punted along with what I had.

I had some Parmesan.Actual cheese and not wood pulp.

.I froze half of the dough, because 4 pizzas are more then I can manage for myself.

I topped the piece I used with the peppers, and a little hot red pepper and olive oil and grated cheese.A little onion and garlic chopped very fine to mix it all up.  Peppers really need to be cooked a little ahead and/or cut very very small….So a B minus sort of pizza.

As I was washing up, I remembered that there was a little bacon in the fridge. THAT would have made the pizza into B plus/A minus grade.

I ended my meal with some dried apricots….

apricots Sunsweet

and some Jammin’ Lemon Ginger…..because this cold snap is going to break soon, right?:

Jammin Lemon Ginger

As for soups…..I want to cook beans and lentils and other sorts of pulses …with greens. I feel a soup week coming on.

 

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Filed under Pantry, winter