Category Archives: Thanksgiving

Turkey talk

turkey-lectern-boynton

Turkey lectern at Boynton, St. Andrew’s Church, Yorkshire. William Strickland is said to have brought the first turkeys into England, and donated this lectern to his church.

william-strickland-coat-of-arms

William Strickland’s Coat of Arms.    Yep, that’s a turkey on top.

albert-flamen-gallus-indicus-coq-djnde-the-turkey-cock-from-thirteen-birds

 

  •  Albert Flamens. Gallus indicus, Coq d’jnde (The Turkey-cock), from Thirteen Birds Fine Arts Museum San Francisco
turkey-delft-tile-1620

Delft tile – 1620

 

Twelfth Night:

SIR TOBY BELCH: Here’s an overwheening rogue!
FABIAN: O, peace! Contemplation makes a rare turkey-cock of him; how he jets under his advanced plumes!

turkey-brought-to-jahangir-from-goa-in-1612-ustad-mansur-l-brown

Turkey Brought To Jahangir From Goa In 1612

 

Thomas Tusser   Five Hundred Points of Good Husbandry, 1577.

 Good bread and good drinke, a good fier in the hall,

brawne, pudding and souse, and good mustard withall.

Beefe, mutton, and porke, shred pies of the best,

pig, veale, goose and capon, and turkey well drest ;

Cheese, apples and nuts, joly Carols to heare,

as then in the countrie is counted good cheare.

black_spanish_turkey_tom1

Norfolk or Spanish Black – the turkey Columbus brought back to Europe, probably, more or less….

“The Turkie, which is in New England a very large Bird, they breed twice or thrice in a year, if you would preserve the young chickens alive, you must give them no water, for if they come to have their fill of water they will drop away strangely, and you will never be able to rear any of them: they are excellent meat, especially a Turkey-Capon beyond that, for which eight shillings was given, their eggs are very wholesome and restore decayed nature exceedingly. But the French say they breed the leprosie, the Indesses make Coats of Turkie feathers woven for their children.”

john-josselyn-2-voyages

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While I’ve been away  from here – it wasn’t far, I promise – WordPress changed things around so now I’m thoroughly confused.

So, while I have another cup of coffee at my favorite coffee place….

kisskadee interior

I’m at the counter – the seat at the end

a few food type things –

  • pickled cranberries are AMAZING – more about them later
  • last Wednesday I was with 44 other people who made 65 apple pies for the local food pantry to distribute for Thanksgiving
  • and the usual Thanksgiving Spokemodel things, like this Wednesday at 6:30 AM on FUN 107
  • Yes, that’s right,  6:30 AM  in the morning….I not only play a Pilgrim Wife, I keep Pilgrim hours. Hence the need for coffee.
  • And the day after Thanksgiving isn’t really  ‘Black Friday’ – that’s a marketing gimmick. It REALLY is

EAT PIE FOR BREAKFAST DAY

 

pie-slices

pumpkin pie

 

pie chart

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Filed under Autumn, Pie, Thanksgiving, Uncategorized

Happy Thanksgiving

Tacchino-720x1024

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November 27, 2014 · 4:25 am

November 13 is National Indian Pudding Day!

 What is Indian Pudding?

Delicious!

 Corn meal (that’s the Indian, as in Indian corn, part)

Corn meal

Corn meal

and milk

This is one of my favorite milkmaid images - Gerard 1652 - or you can buy some milk at the store...

This is one of my favorite milkmaid images – Gerard ter Borch 1652 – or you can buy some milk already strained and bottled at the store…

and molasses,grandmas_molasses all cooked and cooked and cooked until just right.

You can buy it in a canip Kenyon MillsOr you can watch me in this How2Heroes Video and learn to make it, easy peasy.

A special shout out to Megan Stanley who shopped and cooked and packed and schlepped and packed again and schlepped more and cleaned like the super duper trooper  she is.

National-Indian-Pudding-Day-Pictures

Ice cream definitely gilds this lily – and leftovers are GREAT for breakfast. It’s also traditional to serve at Thanksgiving.

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Remember, Remember the Fifth of November

fawkes cartoon

Gunpowder, Treason and Plot….GunpowderPlot

300px-The_Gunpowder_Plot_Conspirators,_1605_from_NPG

That’s Guy, right in the center of things

In 1605, Guy Fawkes (the one who’s name became attached to the event) and others were found with gunpowder in the House of Parliament and seemed to be trying to blow up King and Parliament. This lead to

The Observance of 5th November Act 1605 (3 Ja. I, c. 1,) also known as the “Thanksgiving Act

The Bill was drafted and introduced on 23 January 1605/06 by Edward Montagu. It called for a public, annual thanksgiving for the failure of the Plot.

That ‘s right – November 5th was a Thanksgiving Day in 1606, which is years before 1621…. 1621 isn’t quite as First as it sometimes thinks it is. Just sayin’.

Guy Fawkes got a whole new life in the movies.

V_for_Vendetta_movie_poster

and thus begins a new life for the Guy – as the Mask

The Guy Fawkes Mask  - this one as origami

The Guy Fawkes Mask – this one as origami

Since bonfires are the constant celebration of this day of Thanksgiving

Bonfire in England for 5th of November

Bonfire in England for 5th of November

the foods most associated with this holiday are bonfire toffee plot toffeeand jacket potatoes.

Jacket potatoes?

Mr Potato Head as Indiana Jones with a JACKET

Mr Potato Head as Indiana Jones with a JACKET

But really, Jacket Potatoes are baked (the bonfire connection) with the skins still on….

These three lovely meals in a spud were feature in the New York Times recently

These three lovely meals in a spud were feature in the New York Times recently

The link to the story and the recipes are here: Jacket potatoes 

Don’t forget!

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O Canada! Happy First Thanksgiving

CTday columbus

Today is Canada’s Thanksgiving Day.

Not only are they first in our current calendar, what with October being before November, but they are also first in when they trace their holiday roots.

Yes, they harken their first Thanksgiving back to 1576 ( Martin Frobisher at Baffin Island) and/ or 1606 (Samuel Champlain and the Order of Good Cheer). Sorry, Berkeley Plantation – both of these dates are before 1619. Still not the first.

A rendition of the Order of Good Cheer

A rendition of the Order of Good Cheer

And the Canadians also invented American football…

CTday cfootball

The double double is a Tim Horton’s reference. Tim Horton’s who will now be coming to the US.

Double double the coffee, Double Double the book.

Double double the coffee, Double Double the book.

 

CTday keep calm

and what’s a holiday without a little music?

 

“Thanksgiving National Anthem (O Thanksgiving),” a parody of “Canadian National Anthem (O Canada)” by National Anthems

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Filed under Holiday, Thanksgiving, Thanksgiving, Uncategorized

Craft Corn

I admit, when I saw the headline in the Dining Section of last Wednesday’s New York Times, I thought it was about playing with your food….christmas-crafts-garland_612

but not quite. Sometimes, you have to read the whole headline.

The actual headline: The Rise of Craft Popcorn. And it’s a very interesting story, about small farmers bringing back specialty popcorns, which now must be craft, no doubt because the term artisan has been so overused as to be meaningless.

For one thing, I learned that popcorn

Popcorn kernels

Popcorn kernels -Zea mays everta

is more closely related to flint corn then I thought before…

flint corn

Flint corn or Zea mays indurata – popcorn may actually be a variety of flint corn

 

Which is just in time for Pilgrim and popcorn stories. And Thanksgiving and Turkey stories.

They’re just not true – whether or not flint corn can beget popcorn or not – because no one in the 17th (or 18th) century mentions them. Most of them began in the 19th century which is 200 years too late to be timely, but they’re interesting.

John Howland pondering popcorn at the first Thanksgiving - from a scene from a 19th century novel

John Howland pondering popcorn at the first Thanksgiving – from a scene from a 19th century novel Standish of Standish

Jane Goodwin Austin’s Standish of Standish has this scenes – in 1889.

Jane Goodwin Austin, not to be confused with Jane Austen, the Pride and Prejudice author. Please.

Jane Goodwin Austin, not to be confused with Jane Austen, the Pride and Prejudice author. Please.

Turkey, popcorn and Thanksgiving. They way it never happened.

PaperBagTurkey3

Paperbag turkey with popcorn

directions to paperbag turkey here

The Turkey Shot Out of the Oven 

by Jack Prelutsky

The turkey shot out of the oven

and rocketed into the air,

it knocked every plate off the table

and partly demolished a chair.

It ricocheted into a corner

and burst with a deafening boom,

then splattered all over the kitchen,

completely obscuring the room.

It stuck to the walls and the windows,

it totally coated the floor,

there was turkey attached to the ceiling,

where there’d never been turkey before.

It blanketed every appliance,

it smeared every saucer and bowl,

there wasn’t a way i could stop it,

that turkey was out of control.

I scraped and I scrubbed with displeasure,

and though with chagrin as I mopped,

that I’d never again stuff a turkey

with popcorn that hadn’t been popped.

 

Something BIG Has Been Here written by Jack Prelutsky and illus. by James Stevenson, 1990.

You can’t pop popcorn inside a turkey. Use a covered pan for the best results.

and that doesn’t even begin to cover johnnycakes…..

Johnnycakes from the Kenyon Mills Facebook page - they way they like 'em in Rhode Island

Johnnycakes from the Kenyon Mills Facebook page – they way they like ’em in Rhode Island

and then there’s Indian Pudding, and Brown Bread and sampe and corn bread and …….it’s all grist for the mill…2014_SampeFest_Flyer

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Filed under Autumn, Perception ways, Thanksgiving, The 17th century

Recipes, now and then

Andrew Zimmern

The recipe, which came in a Twitter update from the chef and television personality Andrew Zimmern, was succinct, as the form requires: “Brown 8 thighs, 3 C shallots. Add wine, tarragon, Dijon, sim 30 min covered. Remove lid, reduce. Add 2 C cut cherry toms.”

There was no photograph attached, but he was clearly writing about chicken. An image of the dish was instantly in my mind: the burnished brown of the skin peeking out of a sauce the color of goldenrod, with flecks of green from the tarragon and bright red from the wilted tomatoes. Such is the power of a great recipe in whatever form. The dish seemed obviously cookable. Better yet, it was deeply appetizing. I made it for the family right away.”

Sam Sifton, New York Times Magazine Chicken with Shallots, Chef Style March 19, 2014.

Sam Shifton also wrote a book on Thanksgiving

Sam Sifton also wrote a book on Thanksgiving, a great primer for the day’s cooking

Sifton goes on to say how he knows it’s chicken and how he cooks it and cooks it again, and that the twitter has the essence of the recipe.

Chicken, shallots,

Shallots

Shallots

tarragon

tarragon

tarragon

and cherry tomatoes

Cherry Tomatoes

Cherry Tomatoes

 

The photo to the NY Times

The photo to the NY Times article

Now, if Sifton didn’t know from chicken or tarragon or cherry tomatoes….this might not have been the image he  would have conjured up. But since he had an image and an impression of the dish, he knew how to cook it. So much of cooking is memory.

So much the same for cooks of the past. Just a few words could conjure up an image, and then they’d know what to do, if they even want to do this at all.

In the 17th century they didn’t have Twitter, but some of their recipes  are succinct enough for the form.  And the spelling is totally creative.

Parboyl them with beaten Parsley and Butter in their Bellies, then put them into your Boyler with strong Broth, add a blade of Mace, and some gross pepper, with half a pint of white-wine, grate a little bread into the broth to whitten the Fowl; and so serve them up with the Gravy and a dissolved Anchovy, Garnish’d with Parsly and Violets, or their leaves.

The Whole Duty of a Woman: Or a Guide to the Female Sex, 1696

This is a recipe for………

Pigeons or any small Fowl to Boyl.

It would work equally well with chicken.  Not too far from the the first recipe either – bird, wine, herb.

Violets are edible, as are their heart shaped leaves

Violets are edible, as are their heart shaped leaves

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Filed under Eating, Perception ways, Thanksgiving

T Day

Throwback Thursdays…..

Sarah Jospha Hale as a Bobblehead

Sarah Josepha Hale as a Bobblehead

Why, pray tell is there a Victorian Bobble-head here? What has THIS got to do with Thanksgiving?

This is Sarah Josepha Hale, the godmother of the American holiday of Thanksgiving, so honored and remembered in Bobble form.

Sarah in portrait, decades before The Bobble was even a thought

Sarah in portrait, decades before The Bobble was even a thought

2013 was the 150 anniversary of the holiday, and this woman had worked tirelessly for decades to have the day made into a National Holiday.

A Letter (one of many) that she wrote to Abraham Lincoln to have Thanksgiving, a New England tradition, made into a a National Holiday

A Letter (one of many) that she wrote to Abraham Lincoln to have Thanksgiving, a New England tradition, made into a a National Holiday

So when we gather together in November, we should add Sarah to the things we are thankful that day. And olives. We must be thankful for olives that can be carried to our mouths on the tips of our fingers, and perhaps use them as bobblehead finger puppets. And playing with our food, we should always be thankful for food to play with.

Thank You Sarah: The Woman Who Saved Thanksgiving  by by Laurie Halse Anderson

Thank You Sarah: The Woman Who Saved Thanksgiving by by Laurie Halse Anderson

 

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